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I found only algorithms and implementations for "hit test" in triangle, like this: http://www.emanueleferonato.com/2012/06/18/algorithm-to-determine-if-a-point-is-inside-a-triangle-with-mathematics-no-hit-test-involved/, and this: http://www.blackpawn.com/texts/pointinpoly/default.html

But in the project I work I've found this code:

public static function pointInTriangle($x, $y, $x1, $y1, $x2, $y2, $x3, $y3)
{   
    return self::side($x, $y, $x1, $y1, $x2, $y2, $x3, $y3) &&
           self::side($x, $y, $x1, $y1, $x3, $y3, $x2, $y2) &&
           self::side($x, $y, $x3, $y3, $x2, $y2, $x1, $y1);
}

private static function side($x, $y, $x1, $y1, $x2, $y2, $x3, $y3)
{
    if ($x1 - $x2 != 0) {
        $k    = ($y1 - $y2) / ($x1 - $x2);
        $s1   = $y3 - $y1 - $k * ($x3 - $x1);
        $s2   = $y - $y1 - $k * ($x - $x1);
    }
    else {
        $s1   = $x3 - $x1;
        $s2   = $x - $x1;
    }
    return ($s1 * $s2) >= 0;
}

Can you explain to me how this works? Why do we need to calculate $k (which is slope between x1, y1 and x2, y2 points, isn't it?)?

I have problems to understand first clause. Why do we need to subtract, for example, y1 from y3 and multiple k to subtraction result of x3 and x1? What will do this operation? And what is $k * ($x3 - $x1)? $k is slope between points $x1,$y1 and $x2,$y2, not between $x1,$y1 and $x3,$y3.

I have some knowledge of algebraic geometry. In other words, if main formula (equation of straight line) is y = kx + b, we have 0 = y - y1 - (y2 - y1) / (x2 - x1) * (x - x1) for points (x1, y1) and (x2, y2), and then f(x3, y3) = y3 - y1 - (y2 - y1) / (x2 - x1) * (x3 - x1)?

Am I right?

share|improve this question
    
$k * ($x3 - $x1) is how much the line rises, going from $x1 to $x3. There's no way to understand this without learning the basics of algebraic geometry. – Beta Sep 26 '12 at 13:14
    
Your first equation (0=...) describes the line; I can't make much sense of the second ("f"?). – Beta Sep 26 '12 at 17:08
1  
I know this doesn't help analyze the current code, but the side() function shouldn't need to test if $x1 - $x2 != 0. It is not hard to do this operation without divisions; and the exact equality test is a red flag for numerical instability. – comingstorm Sep 26 '12 at 18:51
    
Beta, how to deriver a formula for $s1 and $s2? Please describe it in your answer. f(x3, y3) = 0 in my second formula, because f(x3, y3) = y3 = y1 + k * (x3 - x1), and then i push y3 to other side of equation within swapping 'plus' to 'minus' and 'minus' to 'plus' – Guy Fawkes Sep 27 '12 at 4:04
up vote 5 down vote accepted

The function side answers the question "Are the points x and x3 on the same side of the line formed by the points x1 and x2". If the answer is "yes" for all three choices of x3, then the point x is inside the triangle.

The implementation of side is kind of clumsy. Look at the first clause:

if ($x1 - $x2 != 0) {
    $k    = ($y1 - $y2) / ($x1 - $x2);
    $s1   = $y3 - $y1 - $k * ($x3 - $x1);
    $s2   = $y - $y1 - $k * ($x - $x1);
}

Yes, $k is the slope of the line from x1 to x2; $s1 and $s2 are the altitudes of the points x3 and x above this line, respectively.

Look at the second clause:

else {
    $s1   = $x3 - $x1;
    $s2   = $x - $x1;
}

Here, $s1 and $s2 have a different meaning. They're how far the two points are to the right of the vertical line.

Either way, this:

return ($s1 * $s2) >= 0;

gives the correct answer. (You'll get into trouble with a line that is almost vertical-- there is a cleaner, safer way, if you're comfortable with vector algebra).

EDIT:

Let's rewrite a line from the first clause:

$s1 = $y3 - $y1 - $k * ($x3 - $x1);
$s1 = $y3 - $k * ($x3 - $x1) - $y1;
$s1 = $y3 - ($k * ($x3 - $x1) + $y1);

The part in bold is the y-coordinate of the point on the line directly below (or above) the point x3. So $s1 is the height of x3 above (or below) that point.

share|improve this answer
    
Execuse me... I re-read your answer after a lot of time - and I don't know which formula do you use to call $s1 altitude to line (x1,y1-x2,y2) from (x3,y3) point. Can you show this formula? – Guy Fawkes Feb 5 '15 at 22:58
    
@GuyFawkes: $s1 = $y3 - $y1 - $k * ($x3 - $x1); – Beta Feb 6 '15 at 1:05
    
:) i asked about common formula name. In all line and altitude equations I seen slope is not using in this way. – Guy Fawkes Feb 6 '15 at 6:02
    
I think it's not real altitude of triangle. It can't be calculated in this way. – Guy Fawkes Feb 6 '15 at 20:50
    
I uderstood. $s1 is not altitude, it's just DISTANCE in Y-coordinates between point (x3,y3) and point on line above or below it with SAME x coordinate. So, if we have y = y1 + slope * (x - x1), where y is Y-coordinate of point below or above (x3, y3), we can to get Y distance as y3 - y = y3 - y1 - slope * (x - x1), because x === x3, we can rewrite it as y3 - y1 - slope * (x3 - x1). Am I right? – Guy Fawkes Feb 6 '15 at 22:00

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