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What is the correct way of removing a file (that may or may not exist) in Cocoa?

If I attempt to remove a file that doesn't exist I get an error. Yet, asking if a file exists appears to be discouraged:

Attempting to predicate behavior based on the current state of the file system or a particular file on the file system is not recommended. Doing so can cause odd behavior or race conditions. It's far better to attempt an operation (such as loading a file or creating a directory), check for errors, and handle those errors gracefully than it is to try to figure out ahead of time whether the operation will succeed.

I'm currently doing the following:

[[NSFileManager defaultManager] removeItemAtPath:filePath error:&error];
if (error.code != NSFileNoSuchFileError) {
    NSLog(@"%@", error);
}

Are there any other border cases I should be aware of?

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1  
Your error-handling is incorrect. You should check whether removeItemAtPath:error: has failed before inspecting the error, and you should compare both its domain and its code, as any particular code is likely to mean different things in different error domains. –  Peter Hosey Sep 26 '12 at 17:37

2 Answers 2

up vote 9 down vote accepted

What is the correct way of removing a file (that may or may not exist) in Cocoa?

If I attempt to remove a file that doesn't exist I get an error. Yet, asking if a file exists appears to be discouraged:

Attempting to predicate behavior based on the current state of the file system or a particular file on the file system is not recommended. Doing so can cause odd behavior or race conditions. It's far better to attempt an operation (such as loading a file or creating a directory), check for errors, and handle those errors gracefully than it is to try to figure out ahead of time whether the operation will succeed.

The correct way is what it says there: Try it and see if you get an error.

Some errors, particularly no-such-file, you can ignore. Others, you may want to try to recover from—for example, if the error relates to permissions, you might try to ask for admin powers. Anything fatal, you should present to the user.

I'm currently doing the following:

[[NSFileManager defaultManager] removeItemAtPath:filePath error:&error];
if (error.code != NSFileNoSuchFileError) {
    NSLog(@"%@", error);
}

Are there any other border cases I should be aware of?

Yes:

  • error is not guaranteed to be set to nil (or at all) when the method succeeds. You should check whether the method has failed first, and only attempt to use error if the method did indeed return failure.
  • An NSError has both a domain and a code. You're only checking one of these. The meaning of the code is determined by the domain; for example, 4 means “no such file” in the Cocoa error domain, but “interrupted system call” in the POSIX error domain and “divided by zero” in the OSStatus error domain. That's why you need to compare both the domain and the code for the error you're testing for.
  • If this code runs on any thread but the main thread, using defaultManager is wrong. Create your own NSFileManager object and use that one.
  • Logging to the Console is sufficient for debugging during development, but you should change this to a presentError: message (on the main thread, if you aren't already) to report it to the user in an alert box.
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+1 Awesome answer. Thanks! –  hpique Sep 26 '12 at 22:09

Think you're on the mark. The only thing I also do is use NSFileManagerDelegate to decide what to do before/after removing files (on error).

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