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I want to print a string in front of each element of a list which in turn is printed in a new row:

Example:

    test = ["aaa", "bee", "cee"]
    print("hello, %s" % "\n".join(storageVolume))

What I get from this is:

    hello, aaa
    bee
    cee

What I want is:

    hello, aaa
    hello, bee
    hello, cee

Any help is appreciated.

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3  
and storageVolume comes from... ? –  Pierre GM Sep 26 '12 at 11:53

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted
for x in test:
    print "Hello, {0}".format(x) 
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2  
This has a SyntaxError... –  mgilson Sep 26 '12 at 12:06
    
My bad, it's corrected now. one-liners with print don't play nice in python. –  Amelia Sep 26 '12 at 12:15
1  
Yay this worked for me. Thank you :) –  Adilicious Sep 26 '12 at 12:50
In [10]: test = ["aaa", "bee", "cee"]

In [11]: print "\n".join("hello, "+x for x in test)
hello, aaa
hello, bee
hello, cee

or:

In [13]: print "\n".join("hello,  {0}".format(x) for x in test)
hello,  aaa
hello,  bee
hello,  cee
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In [51]: test = ["aaa", "bee", "cee"]

In [52]: for elem in test:
   ....:     print "hello,", elem
   ....:
hello, aaa
hello, bee
hello, cee
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     for i in range(len(test)):
        print "Hello, "+(test[i]);
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3  
for i in range(len(test)) is definitely preferred to for i in range(test.__len__()). Although here, it's much better to just iterate over test directly. for elem in test: print "Hello,"+elem –  mgilson Sep 26 '12 at 12:07
    
test can be directly iterated over, without needing to specify a range. (test.__iter__() is available) –  Amelia Sep 26 '12 at 12:19

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