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#include <stdlib.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <math.h>
#include <string.h>

extern char **environ;

int global_x = 10;                  // initialised global variable
int global_y;                       // un-initialised global variable
char global_array1[] = "Hello, world!";     // initialised global array and a string literal
char global_array2[10];             // un-initialised global array
char *global_pointer1 = "bye!";         // global pointer to a string literal 
char *global_pointer2;              // un-initialised global pointer 
float global_float = 100.1;         // initialised global variable
double global_double;               // un-initialised global variable

#define ONEGB  1073741824
#define ONEMB  1048576
#define ONEKB  1024

char *addr(unsigned long a)
{
    unsigned long r; // remainder

    r = (unsigned long) a;
    int gb = (int) ( r / ONEGB );

    r -=  gb * ONEGB;
    int mb = (int) ( r  / ONEMB );

    r -=  mb * ONEMB;
    int kb = (int) ( r  / ONEKB );

    r -=  kb * ONEKB;
    int b  = (int) ( r );

    char *p = malloc(64);

    sprintf(p, "%4dGB, %4dMB, %4dKB, %4d", gb, mb, kb, b);
    return p;
}

int f2(int x)
{
    char * f2_p;
    int f2_x = 21;

    f2_p = malloc(1000);         // dynamically allocated memory

    // print out the address of x
    // print out the addresses of f2_p, and f2_x
    // print out the starting address of the dynamically allocated memory
    .....

    L: f2_x = 10;
    return f2_x;
}

void f1(int x1, int x2, float x3, char x4, double x5, int x6)
{
    int f1_x = 10;
    int f1_y;
    char *f1_p1 = "This is inside f1";   // pointer to another string literal 
    char *f1_p2;

    f1_p2 = malloc(100);         // dynamically allocated memory

    // print out the addresses of x1, x2, x3, x4, x5, x6
    // print out the addresses of f1_x, f1_y, f1_p1, f1_p2
    // print out the address of the string literal "This is inside f1"
    .....

    f1_y = f2(10);
    return;
}

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{

    // print out the addresses of argc, argv
    // print out the starting address and end address of the command line arguments of this process
    // print out the starting address and end address of the environment of this process
    // print out the starting addresses of function main, f1, and f2
    // print out the addresses of global_x, global_y, global_array1, global_array2, global_pointer1,
    //           global_pointer2, global_float, global_double
    // print out the addresses of string literals 10, "Hello, world!", "bye", 100.1

    ..... 

    // call function f1 with suitable arguments such as 12, -5, 33.7, 'A', 1.896e-10, 100 
    f1( .... );

    exit(0);
}

I tried to search on google, but cannot find sth useful, and in this case I just want to figure out how to print out the starting address of the dynamically allocated memory; print out the starting address and end address of the command line arguments of this process;print out the starting address and end address of the environment of this process;print out the starting addresses of function main, f1, and f2. anybody can help me?..thank you!

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4 Answers 4

up vote 0 down vote accepted

In main :

print out the addresses of argc, argv - printf ("%d, %d", &argc, argv);

print out the starting address and end address of the command line arguments of this process - printf ("%d", (void *)argv);

print out the starting address and end address of the environment of this process - printf ("%d", (void *)environ);

print out the starting addresses of function main, f1, and f2 - printf ("%d %d %d", &main, &f1, &f2);

print out the addresses of global_x, global_y, global_array1, global_array2, global_pointer1, global_pointer2, global_float, global_double - just use the & operator in front of each variable whose address you want to print.

print out the addresses of string literals 10, "Hello, world!", "bye", 100.1 - printing addresses of string literals is not allowed.

In f1:

print out the addresses of x1, x2, x3, x4, x5, x6 - printf ("%d %d %d %d %d %d", &x1, &x2, &x3, &x4, &x5);

print out the addresses of f1_x, f1_y, f1_p1, f1_p2 - printf ("%d %d %d %d", &f1_x, &f1_y, f1_p1, f2_p2);

print out the address of the string literal "This is inside f1" - Taking address of a string literal is not allowed

In f2:

print out the address of x - printf ("%d", &x);

print out the addresses of f2_p, and f2_x - printf("%d", f2_p, &f2_x);

print out the starting address of the dynamically allocated memory - printf ("%d", f2_p);

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f1 and f2 (without the (parameter) block) is the starting address of the function For better clarification. f2(x); calls the function int f2(int x) passing the parameter x. "f2" without the parenthesis is the address of function int f2(int x)

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Hi Jeremy, did you mean <blink>printf("address of argc is at %#X\n", &argc);</blink> is the end address and <blink>printf("address of argc is at %#X\n", argc));</blink>is the starting address?.. thank you! –  Gene Zhu Sep 26 '12 at 11:59
    
@GeneZhu I could be wrong but I was pretty sure that f2 is the starting address of the function f2 so I dont think you need to use the & sign... I think you can just call printf("starting address of f2 is at %#X\n", f2); –  Jeremy Sep 26 '12 at 12:02
    
@GeneZhu for x1, x2 etc, using &x1, &x2 prints the address of f1's copy of what is passed through x1 –  Jeremy Sep 26 '12 at 12:03
    
did you mean I print the address before execute the f1 and that address is the starting address? –  Gene Zhu Sep 26 '12 at 12:07
    
if you call printf("starting address of f1 is at %#X\n", f1); it should print the starting address of f1. you should be able to do this anywhere. my understanding is that you just can't call a function from within itself or call the same function more than once at the same time (for example calling f1 in main code and in interrupt code without temporarily disabling interrupts). in all, function names are their starting addresses &var is the address of the var. and you can only print the address of a variable that the function has scope of. for example, you cant print &x1 in main –  Jeremy Sep 26 '12 at 12:14

If you want to see the address of a variable you need to use the & operator or the straight pointer (in the case of dynamically allocated memory).

int main(int argc, char *argv[]){  
   int * arr;
   int i = 0;
   arr = malloc(100 * sizeof(int));
   printf("dynamic array starts at: %#x and ends at: %#x\n",arr,arr+100);
   printf("static i is at: %#x\n",&i);
}

Output:

mike@linux-4puc:~> ./a.out 
dynamic array starts at: 0x804b008 and ends at: 0x804b198
static i is at: 0xbfc1f6d8
share|improve this answer

For that you need the & operator. It takes the address of a variable

Some more info on pointer operators can be found here

to the starting address of a regular variable:

printf("%p", &variable);

These variables don't realy have an end address, but i think what you want is something like:

printf("%p", (&variable + 1));

which prints the next available address

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Hi Minion91,thank you for ur answer, but I still don't understand that how to print the starting address and the end address, could you give me an example?..thank you! –  Gene Zhu Sep 26 '12 at 12:04

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