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extension of: recursing a dictionary of lists of dictionaries, etc et al (python)

I'm working with a nested dictionary structure of 4 levels, I'm trying to iterate of the entire nested dictionary and give each individual dictionary an identification number(as a precursor to building a tree of the items and being able tell which item node is parent, which children a node has etc.)

I have this function:

def r(y):
    cnt = 1
    def recurse(y, count):
        for i in y.iteritems():
            count+=1
            i['id'] = count
            for k,v in y.iteritems():
                if isinstance(v, list):
                    [recurse(i, count) for i in v]
                else:
                    pass
    recurse(y, cnt)
    return y

I put in my nested dictionary of lists of dictionaries,

and I get a mess, i.e. doesn't work like I thought it would.

{'sections': [{'id': 11, 'info': 'This is section ONE', 'tag': 's1'},
              {'fields': [{'id': 15,
                           'info': 'This is field ONE',
                           'tag': 'f1'},
                          {'elements': [{'id': 20,
                                         'info': 'This is element',
                                         'tag': 'e1',
                                         'type_of': 'text_field'},
                                        {'id': 20,
                                         'info': 'This is element',
                                         'tag': 'e2',
                                         'type_of': 'text_field'},
                                        {'id': 20,
                                         'info': 'This is element',
                                         'tag': 'e3',
                                         'type_of': 'text_field'},
                                        {'id': 20,
                                         'info': 'This is element',
                                         'tag': 'e4',
                                         'type_of': 'text_field'}],
                           'id': 16,
                           'info': 'This is field TWO',
                           'tag': 'f2'},
                          {'elements': [{'id': 20,
                                         'info': 'This is element',
                                         'tag': 'e5',
                                         'type_of': 'text_field'},
                                        {'id': 20,
                                         'info': 'This is element',
                                         'tag': 'e6',
                                         'type_of': 'text_field'},
                                        {'id': 20,
                                         'info': 'This is element',
                                         'tag': 'e7',
                                         'type_of': 'text_field'},
                                        {'id': 20,
                                         'info': 'This is element ONE',
                                         'tag': 'e8',
                                         'type_of': 'text_field'}],
                           'id': 16,
                           'info': 'This is field THREE',
                           'tag': 'f3'}],
               'id': 12,
               'info': 'This is section TWO',
               'tag': 's2'},
              {'fields': [{'id': 15,
                           'info': 'This is field FOUR',
                           'tag': 'f4'},
                          {'id': 15,
                           'info': 'This is field FIVE',
                           'tag': 'f5'},
                          {'id': 15,
                           'info': 'This is field SIX',
                           'tag': 'f6'}],
               'id': 12,
               'info': 'This is section THREE',
               'tag': 's3'}],
 'tag': 'test'}

What I want to happen is that all items in level one are numbered, then all items in level two are numbered, then the third level, then the fourth. In this case the main item should be given an id of 1, then the sections be identified as 2,3,4 then fields as 5 on, then elements, etc. Looking back on this after sleeping on it I can see it as a start, but quite wrong.

EDIT: What I really need to do is create a tree of parent/child nodes from a nested dictionary structure so that I can iterate/insert/get/work with as needed the items from this tree. Is there a quick way to do that? I seem to be doing more work than I anticipated.

EDIT2: I found a solution to my original question. I just decided to use the in built id() function instead of an extra step of adding an id, and was able to create the minimal tree I needed, but this is still useful an exercise.

share|improve this question
    
In the original question someone asked what output you wanted, and you said you wanted to "edit stuff out". Here you want a "tree of parent/child nodes", but a tree is not a concrete data structure. Your original data is already a tree of parent/child nodes implemented as a list of dicts - do you want the same lists-of-dicts structure with fewer fields, or do you want your tree to be a list-of-lists, or do you want a flat outline: (1 a, 1.1 b, 1.1.1 c, 1.2 d, ...)? Please post your desired output from the given input. –  Dave Sep 26 '12 at 12:41
    
Well, it is an evolving understanding of what I want to accomplish. I have 4 database models A, B, C, D. B belongs to A, C to B etc. I need to go through this nested structure create A, then create B's and add to A, then create C's and add to corresponding B,etc et al. I need to go through the structure and isolate each node and its relationship to parent/children in a temporary structure that I can reference to say "create this object, attached this other object" hierarchically. And I haven't found an easy way to this, and maybe it is obvious to others, but I'm just trying different methods. –  blueblank Sep 26 '12 at 14:36

4 Answers 4

You're getting duplicate ids because your count variable is local, and once the recurse function exits, any changes to it are lost. You could get around it by declaring a global variable, but since you're not otherwise using the return value of recurse, you can use that instead:

def r(y):
    def recurse(y, count):
        y['id'] = count
        count += 1
        for k,v in y.iteritems():
            if isinstance(v, list):
                for i in v:
                    count = recurse(i, count)
        return count
    recurse(y, 1)
    return y

Edit: Just realized you're looking for a breadth-first assignment of ids... this won't accomplish that, but I'll leave the answer as it may be helpful to get you started.

share|improve this answer

Well, I have a solution that uses depth and parent to set the ID:

>>> def decorate_tree(tree, parent=None, index=None):
    global ID
    if type(tree) == type({}):
        if parent is None:
            parent = '1'
            tree['id'] = parent
        else:
            tree['id'] = '{0}.{1}'.format(parent, index)
        if 'info' in tree:
            print tree['info'], '=>', tree['id']
        child_index = 1
        for key in tree:
            if type(tree[key]) == type([]):
                for item in tree[key]:
                    decorate_tree(item, tree['id'], child_index)
                    child_index += 1


>>> decorate_tree(d)
This is section ONE => 1.1
This is section TWO => 1.2
This is field ONE => 1.2.1
This is field TWO => 1.2.2
This is element => 1.2.2.1
This is element => 1.2.2.2
This is element => 1.2.2.3
This is element => 1.2.2.4
This is field THREE => 1.2.3
This is element => 1.2.3.1
This is element => 1.2.3.2
This is element => 1.2.3.3
This is element ONE => 1.2.3.4
This is section THREE => 1.3
This is field FOUR => 1.3.1
This is field FIVE => 1.3.2
This is field SIX => 1.3.3
>>> from pprint import pprint
>>> pprint(d)
{'id': '1',
 'sections': [{'id': '1.1', 'info': 'This is section ONE', 'tag': 's1'},
              {'fields': [{'id': '1.2.1',
                           'info': 'This is field ONE',
                           'tag': 'f1'},
                          {'elements': [{'id': '1.2.2.1',
                                         'info': 'This is element',
                                         'tag': 'e1',
                                         'type_of': 'text_field'},
                                        {'id': '1.2.2.2',
                                         'info': 'This is element',
                                         'tag': 'e2',
                                         'type_of': 'text_field'},
                                        {'id': '1.2.2.3',
                                         'info': 'This is element',
                                         'tag': 'e3',
                                         'type_of': 'text_field'},
                                        {'id': '1.2.2.4',
                                         'info': 'This is element',
                                         'tag': 'e4',
                                         'type_of': 'text_field'}],
                           'id': '1.2.2',
                           'info': 'This is field TWO',
                           'tag': 'f2'},
                          {'elements': [{'id': '1.2.3.1',
                                         'info': 'This is element',
                                         'tag': 'e5',
                                         'type_of': 'text_field'},
                                        {'id': '1.2.3.2',
                                         'info': 'This is element',
                                         'tag': 'e6',
                                         'type_of': 'text_field'},
                                        {'id': '1.2.3.3',
                                         'info': 'This is element',
                                         'tag': 'e7',
                                         'type_of': 'text_field'},
                                        {'id': '1.2.3.4',
                                         'info': 'This is element ONE',
                                         'tag': 'e8',
                                         'type_of': 'text_field'}],
                           'id': '1.2.3',
                           'info': 'This is field THREE',
                           'tag': 'f3'}],
               'id': '1.2',
               'info': 'This is section TWO',
               'tag': 's2'},
              {'fields': [{'id': '1.3.1',
                           'info': 'This is field FOUR',
                           'tag': 'f4'},
                          {'id': '1.3.2',
                           'info': 'This is field FIVE',
                           'tag': 'f5'},
                          {'id': '1.3.3',
                           'info': 'This is field SIX',
                           'tag': 'f6'}],
               'id': '1.3',
               'info': 'This is section THREE',
               'tag': 's3'}],
 'tag': 'test',
 'type_of': 'custom'}
>>> 

So parent of ID 1.3.4 is ID 1.3, siblings are IDs 1.3.x, children are 1.3.4.x... that way retrieval and insertion shouldn't be too hard (shift indexes).

share|improve this answer

Here is a solution that replaces your count variable with the itertools.count iterator:

from itertools import count
def r(y):
    counter = count()
    def recurse(y, counter):
        for i in y.iteritems():
            i['id'] = next(counter)
            for k,v in y.iteritems():
                if isinstance(v, list):
                    [recurse(i, counter) for i in v]
                else:
                    pass
    recurse(y, counter)
    return y

itertools.count() will create a generator that will return the next integer every time next() is called on it. You can pass it to the recursive function and be sure that duplicate ids will not be created.

share|improve this answer

An alternative to consider is a doubly-linked list. For example:

Index  Tag     Parent  Children        Info
0      test    -1      [s1,s2,s3]      ""
1      s1      0       []              "This is section ONE"
2      s2      0       [f1,f2,f3]      "This is section TWO"
3      f1      2       []              "This is field ONE"
4      f2      2       [e1,e2,e3,e4]   "This is field TWO"
5      e1      4       []              "This is element"
6      e2      4       []              "This is element"
       .
       .
       .

That is a conceptual representation, an actual implementation would use the numerical row index for the children column instead of tags because your input data could be dirty, with duplicate or missing tags, and you don't want to build a structure that depends on tags being unique. Additional columns can easily be added.

You would build the table by walking the tree recursively, but it may be easier to work with items in the tree by using rows in a flat table (a 2D list of lists) to refer to them.

Edit: This is an extension of your solution to the original question (an undecorated list of nodes) that adds structured info (tag, parent, children, etc) to each node. That may be useful if you need to navigate up and down the tree.

Edit: This code:

def recurse(y, n=[], p=-1):
    node = ["", p, [], "", ""]   # tag, parent, children, type, info
    vv = []
    for k,v in y.items():
        if k == "tag":
            node[0] = v
        elif k == "info":
            node[4] = v
        elif isinstance(v, list):
            node[3] = k
            vv = v
    n.append(node)
    p = len(n)-1
    for i in vv:
        n[p][2].append(len(n))
        n = recurse(i, n, p)
    return(n)

nodes = recurse(a)
for i in range(len(nodes)):
    print(i, nodes[i])

produces (spaced manually into columns for readability):

 0 ['test', -1, [1, 2, 14],     'sections',   '']
 1 [  's1',  0, [],             '',           'This is section ONE']
 2 [  's2',  0, [3, 4, 9],      'fields',     'This is section TWO']
 3 [  'f1',  2, [],             '',           'This is field ONE']
 4 [  'f2',  2, [5, 6, 7, 8],   'elements',   'This is field TWO']
 5 [  'e1',  4, [],             '',           'This is element']
 6 [  'e2',  4, [],             '',           'This is element']
 7 [  'e3',  4, [],             '',           'This is element']
 8 [  'e4',  4, [],             '',           'This is element']
 9 [  'f3',  2, [10, 11, 12, 13], 'elements', 'This is field THREE']
10 [  'e5',  9, [],             '',           'This is element']
11 [  'e6',  9, [],             '',           'This is element']
12 [  'e7',  9, [],             '',           'This is element']
13 [  'e8',  9, [],             '',           'This is element ONE']
14 [  's3',  0, [15, 16, 17],   'fields',     'This is section THREE']
15 [  'f4', 14, [],             '',           'This is field FOUR']
16 [  'f5', 14, [],             '',           'This is field FIVE']
17 [  'f6', 14, [],             '',           'This is field SIX']
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