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Consequently to a previous question about const/non-const with ternary operator, is the following test function ok regarding to the C++11 standard :

template<bool UseConst> class MyClass
{
    public:
        constexpr bool test()
        {
             return (UseConst) ? (_constvar) : (_var);
        }

    protected:
        int _var;
        static const int _constvar;
}

The whole problem, is that _constvar is const, and _var is non-const. I would have to access these 2 data depending on the template parameter through the same function, and I would like to have a compile-time function when I use const.

Do the test() function satisfy my requirements ?

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Why not simply specialize on UseConst and go from there? –  Xeo Sep 26 '12 at 12:56
    
Specialize what ? The class or the function ? For the class, I have a large set of functions and it would be far more easier and concise to retrieve the const or the non-const through a single function like here. To specialize the function, I do not see how to do that... –  Vincent Sep 26 '12 at 13:01
    
@Vincent : Non-template member functions inside of class templates are actually just function templates and can be specialized as such without specializing the entire class. See e.g. the code in this answer. –  ildjarn Sep 26 '12 at 18:49
    
Shouldn't test() return an int? And what is the problem in making this test function constexpr? It compiles for me. –  KennyTM Sep 27 '12 at 17:55
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1 Answer

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You could use SFINAE in order to "specialize" your test function. In other words, you could do something like the following:

template<bool true_false>
struct true_type
{
    static char value;
};

template<>
struct true_type<false>
{
    static char value[2];
};

template<bool UseConst> class MyClass
{
    private:
        constexpr int pre_test(const char arg) { return _constvar; }
        int pre_test(char (&)[2]) const { return _var; }

    public:
        constexpr int test()
        {
             return pre_test(true_type<UseConst>::value);
        }

    protected:
        int _var;
        static const int _constvar;
};

Now, when you call MyClass::test, if UseConst is false, test will degrade to a run-time function, but when UseConst is true, you will get a compile-time function.

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