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My teacher asked me to find out the difference.Can anyone help me with this? Actually I know first part of is array of pointer but what the second part means.Both are not same because I tried a code for this:

i = 1;
j = 2;
x[0] = &i;
x[1] = &j;

got an error saying "lvalue required"

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2  
Which language are you referring to? C? –  Max Sep 26 '12 at 13:07

5 Answers 5

int *x[3]; 

Here x is an array of 3 pointers to int.

int (*x)[3];

Here x is a pointer to an array of three ints.

Here's a usage example of both:

int* arrayOfPointers[3];
int x, y, z;
arrayOfPointers[0] = &x;
arrayOfPointers[1] = &y;
arrayOfPointers[2] = &z;

int (*pointerToArray)[3];
int array[3];
pointerToArray = &array;

HTH

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int(*x)[ARRAY_SIZE] interprets as a pointer to an array of integers.

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When in doubt, consult cdecl:

int (*x)[]
declare x as pointer to array of int

int *x[]
declare x as array of pointer to int
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Awesome site :) Thank you. –  keyser Sep 26 '12 at 13:15
    
+1 great site!!! –  Raj Sep 26 '12 at 13:52

Work your way through starting near the variable name "x" and finishing up with type, keeping in mind Operator Precedence. Meaning, anything in ()'s and []s before *'s.

     x[] -- x is an array
    *x[] -- x is an array of pointers
int *x[] -- x is an array of pointers to ints

(*x)        -- x is a pointer
(*x) []     -- x is a pointer to an array
int (*x)[]  -- x is a pointer to an array of type int
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First of all, remember that C declarations reflect the type of an expression (i.e., declaration mimics use).

For example, if you have a pointer to an integer, and you want to access the integer value being pointed to, you dereference the pointer with the unary * operator, like so:

int x = *p;

The type of the expression *p is int, so the declaration of the pointer p is

int *p;

Now suppose you have an array of pointers to int; to access any specific integer value, you subscript into the array to find the correct pointer and dereference the result:

int x = *a_of_p[i];

The subscript operator [] has higher precedence than the unary * operator, so the expression *a_of_p[i] is parsed as *(a_of_p[i]); we're dereferencing the result of the expression a_of_p[i]. Since the type of the expression *a_of_p[i] is int, the declaration of the array is

int *a_of_p[N];

Now flip that around; instead of an array of pointers to int, you have a pointer to an array of int. To access a specific integer value, you must dereference the pointer first and then subscript the result:

int x = (*p_to_a)[i];

Since [] has higher precedence than *, we must use parentheses to force the grouping of operators so that the subscript is applied to the result of the expression *p_to_a. Since the type of the expression (*p_to_a)[i] is int, the declaration is

int (*p_to_a)[N];

When you see a declaration that looks a bit hairy, start with the leftmost identifier and work your way out, remembering that [] and () have higher precedence than *, so *a[] is an array of pointer, (*a)[] is a pointer to an array, *f() is a function returning a pointer, and (*f)() is a pointer to a function:

      x       -- x
    (*x)      -- is a pointer
    (*x)[N]   -- to an N-element array 
int (*x)[N]   -- of int

     x        -- x
     x[N]     -- is an N-element array
    *x[N]     -- of pointer
int *x[N];    -- to int.  
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