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I need to make panel visible for specific time after mouse move over other panel I have been solving this problem quite long. I tried to use Timer but I wasn't successful.

This is my code:

 this.MouseHover += new EventHandler(myMouseHover);

   [...]
   //event handler
   private void myMouseHover(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {

                this.prevPanel.Visible = true;
                this.nextPanel.Visible = true;

                /* here I want put timer */

                this.prevPanel.Visible = false;
                this.nextPanel.Visible = false;

        }
share|improve this question
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Depending on the type of timer you are using, you need to put the code that will hide your panel in response to the tick event.

For example, using the System.Windows.Forms.Timer:

System.Windows.Forms.Timer myTimer = new System.Windows.Forms.Timer();

// form constructor
public myForm() 
{
    myTimer.Interval = 1000;    // or whatever you need it to be
    myTimer.Tick += new EventHandler(TimerEventProcessor);   
}

private void myMouseHover(object sender, EventArgs e) 
{
     this.prevPanel.Visible = true;
     this.nextPanel.Visible = true;
     myTimer.Start();
 }

private void TimerEventProcessor(Object myObject, EventArgs myEventArgs) {
     myTimer.Stop();
     this.prevPanel.Visible = false;
     this.nextPanel.Visible = false;
}

There are other timers you could use, but the WinForms timer has the advantage of firing in the UI thread so you don't need to worry about it. One thing to note is that you need to think about what happens if the mouse hover event fires again before the timer expires.

Finally, if you are using WPF instead of WinForms, you could probably do the whole thing in XAML using animation.

share|improve this answer

You can use Timer and define Interval property

Property :

private System.Windows.Forms.Timer aTimer;

Init :

    aTimer = new System.Windows.Forms.Timer();

    // Hook up the Elapsed event for the timer.
    aTimer.Tick += new ElapsedEventHandler(OnTimedEvent);

    // Set the Interval to 2 seconds (2000 milliseconds).
    aTimer.Interval = 2000;
    aTimer.Enabled = true;

Delegate :

private static void OnTimedEvent(object source, ElapsedEventArgs e)
{
      this.prevPanel.Visible = false;
      this.nextPanel.Visible = false;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you but my problem is that i need to make it inside mouseHover handler, so repeatedly after MouseHover action – marek_lani Sep 26 '12 at 13:23
    
I'am happy to help you, you can add Timer.Start method in your event in order to raise – Aghilas Yakoub Sep 26 '12 at 13:24
    
This code generates an InvalidOperationException. Don't use a System.Timers.Timer, its Elapsed event runs on a threadpool thread. You cannot update UI from such a thread. – Hans Passant Sep 26 '12 at 13:28
    
Thank's i updated with System.Windows.Forms – Aghilas Yakoub Sep 26 '12 at 13:32
    
@AghilasYakoub: Timer.Tick not Timer.Ellapsed. Because consistent naming would be too easy! – Matt Burland Sep 26 '12 at 13:57
System.Timers.Timer timer1 = new System.Timers.Timer ();

timer1.Interval  = periodAfterToStopInMiliseconds;

timer1.Elapsed += timer1_Elapsed;

private void ActLikeIWant(double periodAfterToStopInMiliseconds)
{
    timer1.Start();
}

void timer1_Elapsed(object sender, System.Timers.ElapsedEventArgs e)
{
     var timer = (System.Timers.Timer) sender;

     timer.Stop();

     this.prevPanel.Visible = false;
     this.nextPanel.Visible = false;
}

private void myMouseHover(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    this.prevPanel.Visible = true;
    this.nextPanel.Visible = true;

    ActLikeIWant(periodAfterToStopInMiliseconds: 200);
}
share|improve this answer
1  
If you move the mouse over the panel, then out, then back again, and so on, you'll be creating lots of timers. That's probably undesirable. – Servy Sep 26 '12 at 13:40
    
right buddy, exactly it's undesirable – m4ngl3r Sep 26 '12 at 13:43
    
Now you're attaching your method to the Elapsed handler on ever house over, so the code will be fired several times when the time runs out. You should set the interval and attach the handler in the constructor. – Servy Sep 26 '12 at 13:46

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