Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am a rather novice user of R and have come to appreciate the elegance of ggplot2 and plyr. Right now, I am trying to analyze a large dataset that I can not share here, but I have reconstructed my problem with the diamonds dataset (shortened for convenience). Without further ado:

diam <- diamonds[diamonds$cut=="Fair"|diamonds$cut=="Ideal",]
boxplots <- ggplot(diam, aes(x=cut, price)) + geom_boxplot(aes(fill=cut)) + facet_wrap(~ color)
print(boxplots)

What the plot produces is a set of boxplots, comparing the price of the two cuts "Fair" and "Ideal".

I would now very much like to proceed by statistically comparing the two cuts for each color subgroup (D,E,F,..,J) using either t.test or wilcox.test.

How would I implement this in an way that is as elegant as the ggplot2-syntax? I assume I would use ddply from the plyr-package, but I couldn't figure out how to feed two subgroups into a function that calculates the appropriate statistics..

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 8 down vote accepted

I think you're looking for:

library(plyr)
ddply(diam,"color",
      function(x) {
          w <- wilcox.test(price~cut,data=x)
          with(w,data.frame(statistic,p.value))
      })

(Substituting t.test for wilcox.test seems to work fine too.)

results:

  color statistic      p.value
1     D  339753.5 4.232833e-24
2     E  591104.5 6.789386e-19
3     F  731767.5 2.955504e-11
4     G  950008.0 1.176953e-12
5     H  611157.5 2.055857e-17
6     I  213019.0 3.299365e-04
7     J   56870.0 2.364026e-01
share|improve this answer
    
Wow, this is exactly what I was looking for. I was thinking along the lines of splitting by color, but I couldn't figure out how to further proceed in the function... Thank you very much! –  Michael Sep 26 '12 at 18:59

ddply returns a data frame as output and, assuming that I am reading your question properly, that isn't what you are looking for. I believe you would like to conduct a series of t-tests using a series of subsets of data so the only real task is compiling a list of those subsets. Once you have them you can use a function like lapply() to run a t-test for each subset in your list. I am sure this isn't the most elegant solution, but one approach would be to create a list of unique pairs of your colors using a function like this:

get.pairs <- function(v){
  l <- length(v)
  n <- sum(1:l-1)
  a <- vector("list",n)
  j = 1
  k = 2
  for(i in 1:n){
    a[[i]] <- c(v[j],v[k])
    if(k < l){
      k <- k + 1
    } else {
     j = j + 1
     k = j + 1
    }
  }
 return(a)
}

Now you can use that function to get your list of unique pairs of colors:

> (color.pairs <- get.pairs(levels(diam$color))))
[[1]]
[1] "D" "E"

[[2]]
[1] "D" "F"

...

[[21]]
[1] "I" "J"

Now you can use each of these lists to run a t.test (or whatever you would like) on your subset of your data frame, like so:

> t.test(price~cut,data=diam[diam$color %in% color.pairs[[1]],])

    Welch Two Sample t-test

data:  price by cut 
t = 8.1594, df = 427.272, p-value = 3.801e-15
alternative hypothesis: true difference in means is not equal to 0 
95 percent confidence interval:
 1008.014 1647.768 
sample estimates:
 mean in group Fair mean in group Ideal 
           3938.711            2610.820

Now use lapply() to run your test for each subset in your list of color pairs:

> lapply(color.pairs,function(x) t.test(price~cut,data=diam[diam$color %in% x,]))
[[1]]

    Welch Two Sample t-test

data:  price by cut 
t = 8.1594, df = 427.272, p-value = 3.801e-15
alternative hypothesis: true difference in means is not equal to 0 
95 percent confidence interval:
 1008.014 1647.768 
sample estimates:
 mean in group Fair mean in group Ideal 
           3938.711            2610.820 

...

[[21]]

    Welch Two Sample t-test

data:  price by cut 
t = 0.8813, df = 375.996, p-value = 0.3787
alternative hypothesis: true difference in means is not equal to 0 
95 percent confidence interval:
 -260.0170  682.3882 
sample estimates:
 mean in group Fair mean in group Ideal 
       4802.912            4591.726 
share|improve this answer
1  
The OP asked for a plyr solution, which was perfectly possible using ddply. Even if you want the t.test objects in a list, and not the coefficients in a data.frame, you just use dlpy in stead of ddply. –  Paul Hiemstra Sep 26 '12 at 17:48
    
Thank you very much for this elaborate answer! It does, however, test much more than I wanted: I really wanted to compare the price of cuts in each color group, not the prices of each cut against all other colors. –  Michael Sep 26 '12 at 19:03

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.