Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

My professor is teaching us Scala using Horstmann's book "Scala for the impatient", and one of our homework exercises are straight from the book; Chapter 4, exercise 2.

We are expected to read in the eBook in text format, the professor has specified that the input file should be "Moby Dick", available for free from the Guttenberg project here: http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/2701.txt.utf-8

My code works, as far as counting instances of words. However, he has added the requirement that we must we must format the output in two two columns, with words left justified, and counts right justified. To do so, I am determining the longest word in the book so I can figure the width of the "word" column. However, the values I am getting for the length of the strings is just wrong. In fact, it tells me that all the strings are the same length. "a" is being reported as length 26, just as is "Whale", "Ishmael", etc...

Here's the code:

object Chapter4Exercise2 extends App {

  //for sorting
  import util.Sorting._

  //grab the file
  val inputFile = new java.util.Scanner(new java.io.File("moby.txt"))

  //create a mutable map where key/values == word/count
  val wordMap = collection.mutable.Map[String, Int]() withDefault (_ => 0)

  //for formatting output (later), the longest word length is relevant
  var longestWord = 0
  var theWord: String = ""

  //start reading each word in the input file
  while (inputFile hasNext) {
    //grab the next word for processing, convert it to lower case, trim spaces and punctuation
    var nextWord = inputFile.next().toLowerCase().trim().filter(Character.isLetter(_))
    //if it's the longest word, update both theWord and longestWord
    if (nextWord.size > longestWord) longestWord = nextWord.size; theWord = nextWord; println(theWord + " " + longestWord)
    //update the map value for the key with same value as nextWord
    wordMap(nextWord) += 1
  }

    println("Longest word is " + theWord + " at " + longestWord + " Characters")
}

The output of these lines:

    if (nextWord.size > longestWord) longestWord = nextWord.size; theWord = nextWord; println(theWord + " " + longestWord)

and

    println("Longest word is " + theWord + " at " + longestWord + " Characters")

is way off. It's telling me that EVERY word in the input file is 26 characters long!

Here's a small sample of what's being output:

husks 26

on 26

a 26

surfbeaten 26

beach 26

and 26

then 26

diving 26

down 26

into 26

What am I missing/doing wrong?

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted
if (nextWord.size > longestWord) longestWord = nextWord.size; theWord = nextWord; println(theWord + " " + longestWord)

You shouldn't write multiple statements on a single line like that. Let's write this out in multiple lines and properly indent it:

if (nextWord.size > longestWord)
    longestWord = nextWord.size
theWord = nextWord
println(theWord + " " + longestWord)

Do you see the problem now?

share|improve this answer
    
Ah, I see. The assignment for the longestWord is the only thing executed after the if statement is evaluated. Thanks! –  NickAbbey Sep 26 '12 at 15:20
    
Is blocking and indenting considered better style in Scala, or is podiluska's answer below, where the statements are kind of "in-line" semi-colon delimited and wrapped in curly braces, considered better style? –  NickAbbey Sep 26 '12 at 15:33
    
@NickAbbey Not sure, what you mean by "blocking" or "in-line" here. As far as semicolons are concerned, I think it's common Scala style to not use them (though I'm not an expert). –  sepp2k Sep 26 '12 at 15:40
    
Sorry that wasn't clear, by "blocking" I meant a block of code started with a curly brace, with non-semicolon-terminated statements on separate lines and a curly brace to close the block. By "inline" I meant all semicolon terminated statements on a single line and wrapped in curly braces. my fault, I'm sure I made that terminology up. –  NickAbbey Sep 26 '12 at 16:11
    
@NickAbbey Ah, I see. Writing it all on one line with braces wrapped around would be considered horrible style. –  sepp2k Sep 26 '12 at 16:13

Try putting { and } around your if statement alternatives.

You can avoid this kind of pitfall by formatting your code in a structured manner - always using braces around code blocks.

 if (nextWord.size > longestWord) 
 {
      longestWord = nextWord.size; 
      theWord = nextWord; 
      println(theWord + " " + longestWord);
 }

Your current code is equivalent to

 if (nextWord.size > longestWord) 
 {
      longestWord = nextWord.size; 
 }
 theWord = nextWord; 
 println(theWord + " " + longestWord);
share|improve this answer
2  
Standard style in Scala (and Java) is to put the brace at the end of the preceding line. –  Rex Kerr Sep 26 '12 at 15:32

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.