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I am currently attempting to work with lambdas using (possibly) C#'s Func or Action types.

I would like to create an interface called IMyInterface that defines a method called CreateCRUD. This should take 5 parameters. The first is a string. The next four are functions that call create, read, update and delete methods.

interface IMyInterface
{
    void CreateCRUD(string name, Action<void> createFunc, Action<void> readFunc, Action<void> updateFunc, Action<void> deleteFunc);
}

The four function definitions should take no parameters and return nothing. The code above does not compile. Please point me in the right direction.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Use the non-generic Action instead.

interface IMyInterface
{
    void CreateCRUD(string name, Action createFunc, Action readFunc, Action updateFunc, Action deleteFunc);
}
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2  
"void is not a type": that's not strictly true... typeof(void) returns System.Void. But it can't be used as a generic type parameter –  Thomas Levesque Sep 26 '12 at 15:22
    
Huh. Didn't know that. Edited my answer and learned something new today. Thanks :) –  D Stanley Sep 26 '12 at 15:25

Action<T>:

Encapsulates a method that has a single parameter and does not return a value.

So, you are trying to force delegate with one parameter of type void.

All you need to do is to use Action without type:

interface IMyInterface
{
    void CreateCRUD(string name, Action createFunc, Action readFunc, Action updateFunc, Action deleteFunc);
}

If you want to force parameter types in your delegates then you can should use Action<T> e.g. Action<int>, which means method with int parameter.

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So, the only difference between Func and Action is the return type? Action doesn't have one, Func does? –  Nick Vaccaro Sep 26 '12 at 15:27
    
@Norla - precisely. –  D Stanley Sep 26 '12 at 15:29

Something like

Public delegate Action<T> MyActionDelegate;

interface IMyInterface 
{     
void CreateCRUD(string name, MyActionDelegate createFunc, MyActionDelegate readFunc, MyActionDelegate updateFunc, MyActionDelegate deleteFunc); 
} 
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Question: How does creating a delegate differ from the answers below? –  Nick Vaccaro Sep 26 '12 at 15:25
    
It doesn't. However if there wasn't a suitable delegate defined already, you'd define one and then you could use it as a type in the method. –  Tony Hopkinson Sep 26 '12 at 15:27
    
Would it be proper to create 4 delegates, one for each of the CRUD operations? –  Nick Vaccaro Sep 26 '12 at 15:28
1  
This won't even compile. T doesn't exist in context here. –  Servy Sep 26 '12 at 16:10
1  
@TonyHopkinson Because I don't really see where you're going with this. What should the user use for T? Do you realize that by doing that the parameters are actually methods that return methods that return a value, not just methods that return a value? Did you pick up on the fact that the methods don't actually need to return any value at all, they should be void returning? Did you realize that there is almost never a need to define a delegate anymore, your delegate is essentially the same as just using Func<Action<T>>? –  Servy Sep 26 '12 at 16:54

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