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How to know when all workers from loop are finished? And how to "execute" bw_RunWorkerCompleted after all that workers. I have tried in several ways but I failed. The main worker always finish first.

.Net 3.5

http://pastebin.com/kMmajq6f

using System;
using System.ComponentModel;
using System.Threading;

namespace ConsoleApplication1
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {

            BackgroundWorker bw = new BackgroundWorker();
            bw.DoWork += new DoWorkEventHandler(bw_DoWork);
            bw.RunWorkerCompleted += new RunWorkerCompletedEventHandler(bw_RunWorkerCompleted);
            bw.WorkerSupportsCancellation = true;
            bw.WorkerReportsProgress = true;

            bw.RunWorkerAsync();

            Console.ReadLine();

        }

        static void bw_RunWorkerCompleted(object sender, RunWorkerCompletedEventArgs e)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("All");
        }

        static void bw_DoWork(object sender, DoWorkEventArgs e)
        {
            for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++)
            {
                BackgroundWorker inBW = new BackgroundWorker();
                inBW.DoWork += new DoWorkEventHandler(inBW_DoWork);
                inBW.RunWorkerCompleted += new RunWorkerCompletedEventHandler(inBW_RunWorkerCompleted);

                inBW.RunWorkerAsync(i.ToString());
            }
        }

        static void inBW_RunWorkerCompleted(object sender, RunWorkerCompletedEventArgs e)
        {
            Console.WriteLine(e.Result as String);
        }

        static void inBW_DoWork(object sender, DoWorkEventArgs e)
        {
            Thread.Sleep(new Random().Next(1000, 5000));

            e.Result = e.Argument as string;
        }
    }
}
share|improve this question
1  
Starting an async operation from within an async operation seems meaningless to me. After all, to me the only/main reason for having async operations is to keep the UI responsive. – Uwe Keim Sep 26 '12 at 15:22
    
In such case, the .Net Framework V4 could help greatly with the help of Task class. Can you move to this version or later? – Steve B Sep 26 '12 at 15:22
    
Yes, it's because of UI – zeljic Sep 26 '12 at 15:32
    
I have edited your title. Please see, "Should questions include “tags” in their titles?", where the consensus is "no, they should not". – John Saunders Sep 26 '12 at 16:14
up vote 2 down vote accepted

The RunWorkerCompleted event handler is called once the DoWork event handler returns. In this case the bw_DoWork method returns once it spins off 10 additional BackgroundWorkers.

I was going to suggest you use a CountdownEvent for your case but realized you're on .Net 3.5. In that case you can create something similar using Pulse and Wait.

share|improve this answer
    
It works with CountdownEvent. But is it a good solution? (because you remove your comment). – zeljic Sep 26 '12 at 15:58
    
I edited my answer to have a solution for .net 3.5. I think having a single signalling object is easier to manage than having a list of Manual Reset Events as suggested by @Makubex. – PPC-Coder Sep 26 '12 at 16:02
static int workerCount = 11; // one more for the main BW
static int completedWorkerCount = 0;

static void bw_RunWorkerCompleted(object sender, RunWorkerCompletedEventArgs e)
{
    Console.WriteLine("All");
    updateAllWorkersProgress()
}

static void inBW_RunWorkerCompleted(object sender, RunWorkerCompletedEventArgs e)
{
     Console.WriteLine(e.Result as String);
     updateAllWorkersProgress();
}

static void updateAllWorkersProgress()
{
     if (++completedWorkerCount == workerCount)
     {
           Console.WriteLine("Everything completed");
     }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you, that was my idea too, but I need to run some code from bw_RunWorkerCompleted when all workers are finished. This code is just an example, in real I have much more code :) – zeljic Sep 26 '12 at 15:34
    
Basically I need to keep main worker alive – zeljic Sep 26 '12 at 15:35
    
I've updated to include all workers. Is there a specific order you are trying to achieve? – Joe Sep 26 '12 at 16:13

Like Steve suggested, use Task. But if you are not at the liberty - then create a wait-handle for each sub-worker and wait for all of them in the main bg worker.

You need to have a list/array of ManualResetEvents as you member variable and pass one for each sub-worker. Each sub-worker will signal an event once its complete. The main bg-worker will complete only after all signals have been recieved (use WaitAll)

Refer this - Manual Reset Events and WaitAll on MSDN

share|improve this answer
    
Note that the background workers marshal to the UI thread in the completed event, and that will synchronize the execution of all of those handlers. Because they are already synchronized you can just use a simple counter without worrying about race conditions. – Servy Sep 26 '12 at 16:07
    
In that case you need to keep checking if the counter has reached the specified count to close the main worker. IMO, wasted CPU cycles. – Makubex Sep 26 '12 at 16:12

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