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I am trying to minify an HTML string but also wrap the text at a certain character count. So I need a special function when the HTML string contains embedded CSS. I have tried using the php function "wordwrap" but its wrapping text within double quotes (") and single quotes (') which breaks the display. For example, if we had the following string:

font-family: Arial, 'Helvetica Nueue', 'Times Roman'

Now if we do a wordwrap on this at say, 31, it will become:

font-family: Arial, 'Helvetica
 Nueue', 'Times Roman'

And this will cause browsers to misinterpret the CSS string when loaded.

Does anyone know how or has written a wordwrap function that won't wrap when the text is contained within quotes (single or double)?

Thanks!

UPDATE

Sorry for asking for just code. This is what I envision being done (which I am currently working on programming):

Loop through the CSS string and grab chunks of the string that are inbetween ; } or { if its close the break limit, add the substrings to an array. Once the loop is complete implode the array into a string using "\n" as the glue.

Anyone have a better/different approach?

share|improve this question
    
The example you give is a wrong one. PHP's wordwrap function does not behave as you tell it is behaving. Also what have you tried so far? Please post your code. – hakre Sep 26 '12 at 15:24
    
@hakra - You are correct, I have updated my question. I have not written anything yet...don't want to re-invent the wheel if someone else has already tackled this issue. – thiesdiggity Sep 26 '12 at 15:27
    
That CSS fragment is all you need to care about. Or will there be even more from the CSS grammar, like double quotes, brackets and so on and so forth? – hakre Sep 26 '12 at 15:32
1  
Also you are basically asking for code only. This is not that much liked on this site. You should present - even if only in pseudo-code - how you would approach the problem. – hakre Sep 26 '12 at 15:37
1  
Why do you care about word wrapping if your goal is to minify an HTML string? Adding those additional new-lines is just going to "bloat" your string unnecessarily. – Jonah Bishop Sep 26 '12 at 15:42
up vote 1 down vote accepted

The PHP wordwrap function has some knowledge about specific ASCII characters.

In your example text you do not want to allow the spaces inside of single quotes to wrap, so you can just replace spaces with non-breaking spaces. wordwrap will then not wrap at those any longer:

$nowrap = function ($string) {
    return str_replace(' ', "\xA0", $string);
};

This is a ASCII version for such a "nowrap" function.

As it only needs to be applied partially to the single-quoted parts, those parts need to be obtained. This can be easily done with a regular expression:

/'[^']+'/

To apply the nowrap function onto the matches however, this needs a helper function to map the first matching group to the input value:

$first = function ($callback) {
    return function ($params) use ($callback) {
        return $callback($params[0]);
    };
};

Then this can be easily applied:

$quotes  = "/'[^']+'/";
$subject = preg_replace_callback($quotes, $first($nowrap), $subject);

You can then safely apply the wordwrap function which for the example wordwrap($subject, 31) will give the following output:

font-family: Arial,
'Helvetica Nueue',
'Times Roman'

You can also convert those back if you do not want to have these in your output.

The code in full:

$subject = "font-family: Arial, 'Helvetica Nueue', 'Times Roman'";

$nowrap = function ($string) {
    return str_replace(' ', "\xA0", $string);
};

$first = function ($callback) {
    return function ($params) use ($callback) {
        return $callback($params[0]);
    };
};


$quotes  = "/'[^']+'/";
$subject = preg_replace_callback($quotes, $first($nowrap), $subject);


echo wordwrap($subject, 31);
share|improve this answer

If you need to send this HTML via e-mail you should use either quoted_printable_encode() or base64_encode() followed by chunk_split().

Both approaches will make sure that the lines don't exceed 76 characters.

Don't forget to also set the appropriate Content-Transfer-Encoding MIME header, either quoted-printable or base64.

share|improve this answer
    
that is an interesting approach but unfortunately I am not sure how the ESP is going to be sending the email, which is why I would prefer it to be straight HTML. – thiesdiggity Sep 26 '12 at 16:20
    
What's ESP? I'm assuming you are sending the email yourself, but typically email sending providers already apply the proper wrapping. – Ja͢ck Sep 26 '12 at 16:25
    
ESP = Email Service Provider – hakre Sep 26 '12 at 21:26
    
@hakra Thanks, figured as much :) in which case this is probably a non-issue. – Ja͢ck Sep 27 '12 at 2:00

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