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I found this example (the "checked" version) and it works:

http://jsfiddle.net/2cTwA/

But I want to wrap the input and labels inside a container element (like nav), and if I do that the tabs stop working :(

Is there any solution for this?

found solution: http://jsfiddle.net/2cTwA/7/

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What have you tried to make it work? –  Jrod Sep 26 '12 at 15:33
    
I found a solution!! I can wrap the labels inside an elmenet, and just leave the inputs inside the same parent as the tabs. They are hidden anyway so I dont care:D –  Alex Sep 26 '12 at 15:45
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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

With a slight HTML and CSS modification - DEMO

CSS

input { display: none; }

nav { overflow: hidden }
label   { float: left; display: inline-block; padding: 5px 10px; }
label a { color: #d33; text-decoration: underline; cursor: pointer; }   

.tab { display: none; border: 1px solid #333; padding: 10px; }
a[name="tab1"] + .tab { display: block }
:target + .tab { display: block }
:target ~ a[name="tab1"] + .tab { display: none  }

HTML

<section class="tab-area tabs-checked">

    <nav>
        <input checked type="radio" name="tab" id="tab-A" />
        <input type="radio" name="tab" id="tab-B" />
        <input type="radio" name="tab" id="tab-C" />

        <label class="tab-link" for="tab-A"><a href="#tab1">Tab 1</a></label>
        <label class="tab-link" for="tab-B"><a href="#tab2">Tab 2</a></label>
        <label class="tab-link" for="tab-C"><a href="#tab3">Tab 3</a></label>
    </nav>

    <a name="tab3"></a>
    <article class="tab">
        <h3>Tab 3</h3>          
    </article>

    <a name="tab2"></a>
    <article class="tab">
        <h3>Tab 2</h3>
    </article>    

    <a name="tab1"></a>
    <article class="tab">
        <h3>Tab 1.</h3>
    </article>

</section>
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hmm there's no active tab by default –  Alex Sep 26 '12 at 15:50
    
@Alex now it has an active tab.. just a small caveat - to use the ~ sibling selector properly you have to revert the order of your article tabs –  Zoltan Toth Sep 26 '12 at 16:46
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You're using the sibling selector (~), and by using a containing element such as nav, you are removing the inputs and labels from being siblings of the articles.

You simply need to rewrite your css where you use the tilde.

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here is the sass example for 12(max) tabs using CSS only

.tabs {

  input[type=radio] {
    display: none;

    @for $i from 1 through 12 {

      &:nth-of-type(#{$i}):checked ~ .content .tab:nth-child(#{$i}) {
        display: block;
      }
    }
  }

  label {
    cursor: pointer;
    display: inline-block;
  }

  .tab {
    display: none;
  }
}

and here is the html markup

  <div class="tabs">
    <input name="controls" type="radio" id="controls-tab" checked="true"/>
    <label for="controls-tab">controls</label>
    <input name="controls" type="radio" id="panels-tab"/>
    <label for="panels-tab">panels</label>
    <input name="controls" type="radio" id="readme-tab"/>
    <label for="readme-tab">readme</label>
    <div class="content">
      <div class="tab">
      </div>
      <div class="tab">
      </div>
      <div class="tab">
      </div>
    </div>
  </div>

no need to relatively position tab divs inside content div. no need to set content height.

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