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I'm attempting to build a layout that allows a flexible height header and footer, with a section in the middle consuming the remaining space. Any overflow in the middle should give a scroll bar just for this middle section.

The code I have that works fine for Safari and Chrome is:

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
  <head>
    <style>
      html, body {
        margin: 0;
        padding: 0;
        height: 100%;
      }

      .l-fit-height {
        display: table;
        height: 100%;
      }

      .l-fit-height > * {
        display: table-row;
        height: 1px;
        background-color: red;
      }

      .l-fit-height-expanded {
        height: auto;
        background-color: blue;
        display: table-row;
      }

      .l-scroll-content {
        height: 100%;
        overflow-y: auto;
      }
    </style>
  </head>
  <body>
    <div class="l-fit-height">
      <section>
        Header
      </section>
      <section class="l-fit-height-expanded">
        <div class="l-scroll-content">
          <p>Foo</p>
          <p>Foo</p>
          <p>Foo</p>
          <p>Foo</p>
          <p>Foo</p>
          <p>Foo</p>
          <p>Foo</p>
          <p>Foo</p>
          <p>Foo</p>
          <p>Foo</p>
          <p>Foo</p>
          <p>Foo</p>
          <p>Foo</p>
          <p>Foo</p>
          <p>Foo</p>
        </div>
      </section>
      <section>
        Footer
      </section>
    </div>
  </body>
</html>

I cannot for the life of me figure out why the behaviour is different in Firefox. The content in the middle will expand height correctly, but will not shrink more than the height of the contents.

It's difficult to know what is the correct behaviour. Any ideas?

Edit

Similar example setup here: http://jsfiddle.net/t3mZF/

Interestingly if .l-fit-height-row-content is changed to display: table-cell then WebKit and Gecko exhibit the same behaviour or ignoring the overflow.

If display: block is used then WebKit gives desired behaviour (a scroll bar and footer remains at bottom of view port), but Firefox refuses to add the scroll bars and instead pushes the footer off the bottom of the screen (scroll bar on view port - not the middle content).

I've also opened a bugzilla ticket

share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 10 down vote accepted

I've discovered with a couple of extra div's and a crucial display: inline-block it is possible to use the absolute positioning trick Torben mentions, in Firefox as well. This means that fully flexible header and footer is possible as a pure CSS solution.

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
  <head>
    <style>
      html, body {
        margin:  0;
        padding: 0;
        height:  100%;
      }

      .l-fit-height {
        display: table;
        height:  100%;
      }

      .l-fit-height-row {
        display: table-row;
        height:  1px;
      }

      .l-fit-height-row-content {
        /* Firefox requires this */
        display: table-cell;
      }

      .l-fit-height-row-expanded {
        height:  100%;
        display: table-row;
      }

      .l-fit-height-row-expanded > .l-fit-height-row-content {
        height: 100%;
        width:  100%;
      }

      .l-scroll {
        /* Firefox requires this to do the absolute positioning correctly */
        display:    inline-block;
        overflow-y: auto;
        position:   relative;
      }

      .l-scroll-content {
        position: absolute;
        top:      0;
        bottom:   0;
      }
    </style>
  </head>
  <body>
    <div class="l-fit-height">
      <section class="l-fit-height-row">
        <div class="l-fit-height-row-content">
          Header
        </div>
      </section>
      <section class="l-fit-height-row-expanded">
        <div class="l-fit-height-row-content l-scroll">
          <div class="l-scroll-content">
            <p>Foo</p>
            <p>Foo</p>
            <p>Foo</p>
            <p>Foo</p>
            <p>Foo</p>
            <p>Foo</p>
            <p>Foo</p>
            <p>Foo</p>
            <p>Foo</p>
            <p>Foo</p>
            <p>Foo</p>
          </div>
        </div>
      </section>
      <section class="l-fit-height-row">
        <div class="l-fit-height-row-content">
          Footer
        </div>
      </section>
    </div>
  </body>
</html>

Hope this helps

share|improve this answer
    
Nice work! I also tried display:inline-block and it didn't work for me when I was looking for an answer to your problem, but obviously I did something wrong. This works perfectly. Could be a good improvement to my CSS-Layout-Grid code as well. It's great to see when something develops into something better :) –  Torben Oct 4 '12 at 17:21
6  
I found this tedious to follow because of all the overwrought class names, and I'm sure others would, too. However, this is a very useful solution, and I think it would be a shame for someone not to use it simply because he or she had trouble following it. Thus, I've updated the fiddle example with one that I hope is more semantic and easier to follow, for anyone who wishes to use it: jsfiddle.net/t3mZF/17. –  Derek Henderson Jul 31 '13 at 17:26

I think you ran into two combined problems here:

  1. Table-dimensions aren't as fixed as you might expect it from a normal div. Tables usually grow with their content and don't care much about their height property if the content is too big.

    Therefore you have to exclude the content of the scroll-box from the content-size calculation by position it absolutely. All that's now left to do is to set the position and size the scroll-box to fill the complete space of the expanded table-row. However, this raises another issue:

  2. The straightforward solution would be to set position:relative; for the table-row and width:100%;height:100%; for the scroll-box, but this won't work because most browsers ignore the position-property of table-rows. You could insert another div with display:table-cell;position:relative; between the table-row and the scroll-box, but this will only work for all browsers except Firefox, since Firefox doesn't allow any relative positioning within a table.

    Firefox however allows relative positioning for the table itself, so the trick is to set position:relative; for the table-div and set the size and the position of the scroll-box according to the dimensions of the whole table.

As you might expect this comes with some limitations if you want to use a pure CSS solution, but there are some anyway. Apart from that there's also an elegant way to solve the problem with JavaScript, which I've included in the code, too.

The code below includes three ways to solve your problem. Two are pure CSS solutions and one, which uses JavaScript. I've tried to change you code as less as possible and commented all changes, so I think you'll find you way through the lines. Leave a comment if you still have questions.

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
  <head>
    <style>
      html, body {
        margin: 0;
        padding: 0;
        height: 100%;
      }

      .l-fit-height {
        display: table;
        height: 100%;
        /* NOTE Use the table as refernece for absolute positioning. This */
        /*      is the only place where Firefox accepts the position property */
        /*      within a table. */
        position: relative;
      }

      .l-fit-height > * {
        display: table-row;
        height: 1px;
        background-color: red;
      }

      .l-fit-height-expanded {
        /* NOTE Set the important flag to override the generic setting */
        height: auto !important;
        background-color: blue;
        display: table-row;
      }

      .l-scroll-content {
        /* NOTE We will set the height attribute later */
        /* height: 100%; */
        overflow-y: auto;
        /* INFO Prevent the table from growing in height */
        position: absolute;
        /* INFO The content should span the full width */
        width: 100%;
      }

      /* INFO Since Firefox only allows absolute positioning relative to the */
      /*      whole table, setting the correct height is a bit tricky. I've */
      /*      found two pure CSS solutions which work, but both have their */
      /*      glitches. If JavaScript is ok for you, there's another solution */
      /*      which I would recommend. */

      /* INFO Example for percentage height footer and header. This sometimes */
      /*      leaves one or two pixels between the scroll-box and the footer. */
      /* REMOVE THIS LINE TO ACTIVATE
      .l-fit-height > * {
        height: 20%;
      }
      .l-scroll-content {
        height: 60% !important;
      }
      /**/

      /* INFO Example for fixed height footer and header. Unfortunately this */
      /*      makes the header and footer-content unclickable, but I'm quite */
      /*      sure this could be solved by setting a z-index. */
      /* REMOVE THIS LINE TO ACTIVATE
      .l-fit-height > * {
         height: 40px;
      }
      .l-scroll-content {
         -moz-box-sizing: border-box;
         -webkit-box-sizing: border-box;
         box-sizing: border-box;
         height: 100%;
         border-top: 40px solid transparent;
         margin-top: -40px;
         border-bottom: 40px solid transparent;
         margin-bottom: -40px;
      }
      /**/
    </style>
    <script type="text/javascript">
        // INFO Example how to fix the problem with JavaScript. This works for
        //      all kinds of heights (flexible, percentage and fixed) and has no
        //      issues except for the need of JavaScript to see a correctly
        //      layouted page.
        //* REMOVE THE FIRST SLASH TO DEACTIVATE
        function fixScrollContentHeight() {
            var nodes = document.getElementsByClassName('l-scroll-content');
            for (var i = 0; i < nodes.length; i++)
                nodes[i].style.height = nodes[i].parentNode.offsetHeight+'px';
        }
        window.onload = fixScrollContentHeight;
        window.onresize = fixScrollContentHeight;
        //*/
    </script>
  </head>
  <body>
    <div class="l-fit-height">
      <section>
        Header
      </section>
      <section class="l-fit-height-expanded">
        <div class="l-scroll-content">
          <p>Foo</p>
          <p>Foo</p>
          <p>Foo</p>
          <p>Foo</p>
          <p>Foo</p>
          <p>Foo</p>
          <p>Foo</p>
          <p>Foo</p>
          <p>Foo</p>
          <p>Foo</p>
          <p>Foo</p>
          <p>Foo</p>
          <p>Foo</p>
          <p>Foo</p>
          <p>Foo</p>
        </div>
      </section>
      <section>
        Footer
      </section>
    </div>
  </body>
</html>

PS: I wasn't able to test my code with IE, but I think it should work there, too.

share|improve this answer
    
Awesome! Great answer. I think I'm going to have to go for the JS root as percentage and pixels are out of the question. Thanks for explaining the behaviour I've been experiencing. –  Theozaurus Sep 27 '12 at 11:52
    
Torben: I think I've found a way to make the absolute positioning work correctly for Firefox. Please see my answer. –  Theozaurus Sep 27 '12 at 13:42

From here How to get firefox to show an auto horizontal scollbar for a div?

Firefox doesn't recognize overflow-x and overflow-y.

Instead use overflow:-moz-scrollbars-horizontal; or overflow:-moz-scrollbars-vertical;

share|improve this answer
    
Changing .l-scroll-content to have overflow: -moz-scrollbars-vertical; Gives it scroll bars permanently, but still forces the header and footer from the view port as the middle section cannot shrink. –  Theozaurus Sep 26 '12 at 16:21
    
Mozilla have now deprecated -moz-scrollbars-horizontal and -moz-scrollbars-vertical... developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/CSS/overflow –  mrdnk Sep 26 '12 at 19:45
    
If I see it right, the problem is not that the scrollbars aren't visible, but that the size of the scrollbox is incorrect. –  Torben Sep 27 '12 at 10:44

Please check my update.

<html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">
<head>
<title>Untitled Document</title>
<style>

html, body {
height:99.9%;
margin:0;
padding:0;
}

#wrapper {
    margin: auto;
    overflow: hidden;
    position: relative;
    width: 99.9%;
}

#main {
    margin-bottom: 67px;
    margin-top: 77px;
    overflow: auto;
    padding-bottom: 80px;
}

#footer {
    bottom: 0;
    clear: both !important;
    height: 75px !important;
    margin-top: -68px !important;
    position: fixed !important;
}

#header {
    background: none repeat scroll 0 0 #FFFFFF;
    border: 1px solid #000000;
    height: 75px !important;
    margin-top: -77px;
    overflow: hidden;
    position: fixed;
    width: 100%;
}
</style>

</head>

<body>

     <div id="wrapper">
         <div id="main">
            <div id="header">header contents goes here</div>

            <div id="content">
                main contents
            </div>
         </div>
     </div>
     <div id="footer" style="width:99.9%; margin:auto; border:solid 1px #666; ">
      Footer content goes here
     </div>

</body>
</html>
share|improve this answer
    
I've tried this out in Chrome and Firefox, and it does not give a sticky header and footer (the type that is always visible in the view port). As a result the centre section does not scroll. –  Theozaurus Sep 26 '12 at 16:40
    
please check my update. –  suresh.g Sep 27 '12 at 7:54
    
I've tried the updated version, but when I fill the centre section with more content it adds a scroll bar to the whole view port, and overflows into the footer. The header and footer are also static sizes, not flexible. –  Theozaurus Sep 27 '12 at 8:40

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