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(In my applicaton with Swing GUI) I want to display GlassPane during some work performed in a loop or method, which is called after clicking JButton.

For example: (action performed after clicking a button)

if (item.equals(button)) {

    glassPane.setVisible(true);

    someTimeConsumingMethod();

    glassPane.setVisible(false);

}

Running this code results in not showing the glassPane during execution of someTimeConsumingMethod() - GUI just freezes for a moment, before result is displayed. Removing last line in that loop (glassPane.setVisible(false);) results in showing glassPane after the method is done (when GUI unfreezes).

Is there a simple way to show that glassPane before GUI freezes, or I need to use some advanced knowledge here? (threads?)

UPDATE1:

I've updated my code according to davidXYZ answer (with two changes):

(action performed after clicking a button)

if (item.equals(button)) {

    glassPane.setVisible(true);

        new Thread(new Runnable(){
            public void run(){
                someTimeConsumingMethod(); // 1st change: running the someTimeConsumingMethod in new Thread
                                           //             instead of setting glassPane to visible
            }
        }).start();

    // 2nd change: moved glassPane.setVisible(false); inside the someTimeConsumingMethod(); (placed at the end of it).

}

The point of 1st change is that setting glassPane visible in new thread right before running someTimeConsumingMethod in my GUI thread was revealing the glassPane after someTimeConsumingMethod finished (double-checked this).

Now it works fine, thank you for all answers. I will definitely check all the links you provided to actually understand threads!

UPDATE2: Some more info: someTimeConsumingMethod(); in my application is prepering new Swing Components accoriding to the XML data (cards builded from JButtons and JLabels with few JPanels where needed, and adding them in correct places).

UPDATE3: I am trying to make it work using SwingWorker's invokeLater method. Now it looks like that:

(action performed after clicking a button)

if (item.equals(button)) {

    glassPane.setVisible(true);

    SwingUtilities.invokeLater(new Runnable() {
        @Override
        public void run() { 
            someTimeConsumingMethod();
            glassPane.setVisible(false);
        }
    });

}

It works not that good as code from UPDATE1 (but still - it works). Problems are:

  • glassPane loads without .gif animation (file is setted up in custom glassPane class - it works with UPDATE1 code)

  • there is small delay at the end of "working" process - first cursor changes to normal (from the WAIT_CURSOR), and after very short moment glassPane disappear. Cursor is changed by the custom glassPane class on activation/deactivation (no delay using new Thread way).

Is it correct way of using SwingWorker's invokeLater method?

EDIT: My mistake, I confused SwingWorker with SwingUtilities.invokeLater(). I guess the image issue is due to GUI freezing when the someTimeCOnsumingMethod starts.

share|improve this question
    
Need to clarify. Do you want the glassPane to be visible while someTimeConsumingMethod is running and then close it right after the function is done? –  davidXYZ Sep 26 '12 at 17:30
    
Yes, that is exactly what I want to achieve. So far I was thinking that cade execution is ordered from the top to bottom (looking at the code in some editor) - when one instruction end, next one starts, but I guess its not that simple. Will try to solve my problem with provided answers. –  TV. Sep 26 '12 at 17:46
    
In that case, you definitely need another thread to handle some of the tasks. I have given an answer below with an example. –  davidXYZ Sep 26 '12 at 18:16

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

GUI just freezes for a moment, before result is displayed. Removing last line in that loop (glassPane.setVisible(false);) results in showing glassPane after the method is done (when GUI unfreezes).

this is common issue about Event Dispath Thread, when all events in EDT are flushed to the Swing GUI in one moment, then everything in the method if (item.equals(button)) { could be done on one moment,

but your description talking you have got issue with Concurency in Swing, some of code blocking EDT, this is small delay, for example Thread.sleep(int) can caused this issue, don't do that, or redirect code block to the Backgroung taks

Is there a simple way to show that glassPane before GUI freezes, or I need to use some advanced knowledge here? (threads?)

this question is booking example why SwingWorker is there, or easier way is Runnable#Thread

  • methods implemented in SwingWorker quite guarante that output will be done on EDT

  • any output from Runnable#Thread to the Swing GUI should be wrapped in invokeLater()

easiest steps from Jbuttons Action could be

  • show GlassPane

  • start background task from SwingWorker (be sure that listening by PropertyChangeListener) or invoke Runnable#Thread

  • in this moment ActionListener executions is done rest of code is redirected to the Backgroung taks

  • if task ended, then to hide GlassPane

  • create simple void by wrapping setVisible into invokeLater() for Runnable#Thread

  • in the case that you use SwingWorker then you can to hide the GlassPane on proper event from PropertyChangeListener or you can to use any (separate) void for hidding the GlassPane

best code for GlassPane by @camickr, or my question about based on this code

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for the very detailed answer –  Guillaume Polet Sep 26 '12 at 17:33
    
Thanks for very detailed answer, I've got some reading now ;-). –  TV. Sep 26 '12 at 19:19
    
Please check UPDATE3. –  TV. Sep 27 '12 at 11:08
    
as mentioned @Guillaume Polet and I too, move code execution e.g. someTimeConsumingMethod(); to the SwingWorker or Runnable#Thread –  mKorbel Sep 27 '12 at 11:12
    
You can see in UPDATE3, that someTimeConsumingMethod(); is running from SwingWorker right now, which is working with small issues described under the example. I don't know if I am using SwingWorker's invokeLater method in correct way. –  TV. Sep 27 '12 at 11:29
 JButton startB = new JButton("Start the big operation!");
    startB.addActionListener(new ActionListener() {
      public void actionPerformed(java.awt.event.ActionEvent A) {
        // manually control the 1.2/1.3 bug work-around
        glass.setNeedToRedispatch(false);
        glass.setVisible(true);
        startTimer();
      }
    });

glasspane here used here is FixedGlassPane glass;

ref: http://www.java2s.com/Code/Java/Swing-JFC/Showhowaglasspanecanbeusedtoblockmouseandkeyevents.htm

share|improve this answer
    
this is correct way how to delay desired event out of the EDT, +1 for Swing Timer –  mKorbel Sep 26 '12 at 19:27
    
I will check this example aswell, thank you. –  TV. Sep 26 '12 at 19:43

You are blocking the EDT (Event Dispatching Thread, the single thread where all UI events are handled) with your time consuming job.

2 solutions:

  1. Wrap the calls to:someTimeConsumingMethod();glassPane.setVisible(false); in SwingUtilities.invokeLater(), this will allow the frame to repaint itself once more. However this will still freeze your GUI.

  2. Move your someTimeConsumingMethod() into a SwingWorker (this is the recommended option). This will prevent your GUI from ever freezing.

Read the javadoc of SwingWorker to understand better what is going on and how to use it. You may also learn a lot in this tutorial about Swing and multi-threading

share|improve this answer
    
for faster answer, and very good answer :-) –  mKorbel Sep 26 '12 at 17:30
    
@mKorbel Thanks –  Guillaume Polet Sep 26 '12 at 17:33
    
there not reason why thanking, nor me, I'm talking about describtion :-) –  mKorbel Sep 26 '12 at 17:35
    
Thanks for the answer, I need to learn more about threads! –  TV. Sep 26 '12 at 19:20
    
@TV. then try to avoid use the way that you accepted, everything about Swing JComponents (in your case GlassPane) must be doe on EDT, or wrapped into invokeLater, and hard and long running code must be redirected to the runnable#thread, I can show you 1Mio codes where is required to block EDT, but works only in this form, have to calculating with big throubles, nor in case that there is multithreading, caused locked current JVM instance until is killed by using Task manager –  mKorbel Sep 26 '12 at 20:17

Guillaume is right. When you are on the main thread, each line will finish before the next line. You definitely need another thread.

An easy way to solve your problem is to spin off the display of the glasspane in another thread (normal thread or Swing threads - either will work fine).

if (item.equals(button)) {
    new Thread(new Runnable(){
        public void run(){
            glassPane.setVisible(true);
        }
    }).start();
    someTimeConsumingMethod();
    glassPane.setVisible(false);
}

That way, a different thread is blocked by setvisible(true) while someTimeConsumingMethod() runs on the main thread. When it's done, glasspane will disappear. The anonymous thread reaches the end of the run method and stops.

share|improve this answer
    
I used your example in my code, check my updated question post if interested. –  TV. Sep 26 '12 at 19:19
    
@TV I see the changes you made. That works! :) –  davidXYZ Sep 26 '12 at 20:14
    
Okay, so lets violate the EDT shell we...It would be better to use a SwingWorker and turn off the glass pane in the done method... –  MadProgrammer Sep 26 '12 at 20:19
1  
@davidXYZ When you open any program and start loading data, do you usually want to be resizing your window? is irreverent, you're code will make the program look like it's hung and the user will be tempted to forcefully terminate it. IMHO it looks unprofessional and shabby. I agree, you should provide feedback to the user that you executing a long running task, but to the determinent of the usability of the program. The 1st rule of Swing, is updates to the UI (any part of the UI) must be done on the EDT, the 2nd rule is, to block the EDT. –  MadProgrammer Sep 26 '12 at 22:22
1  
@MadProgrammer For the last part of your comment, I think you meant "Do NOT block the EDT" –  Guillaume Polet Sep 26 '12 at 22:31

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