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I have a MongoDB setup of e.g. 2 shards and 2 machines per shard, a total of 4 physical machines. I also have a program that queries for some docs, do some processing on each doc, and write back in DB a new version of each doc replacing the old one (but keeping the shard key the same).

Now, I would like to make the same program run in a distributed way, so a simple idea would be to run separate instances of the program in each of the 4 physical machines.

The tricky part is that I want each instance of the program to retrieve and work only on the data that are located on the same physical machine (in order to minimize data move over the network).

I am thinking of instead of changing the program (in order to check which docs live in the local machine by querying "config" db etc), to just make each instance of the program to connect to the local mongod process. That way by running the exact same queries it should retrive and work on only the local results.

Would that approach work? Do I miss something?

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That might work. But it's not supported. :) –  Sergio Tulentsev Sep 26 '12 at 16:36
2  
you have two shards - that means only two primaries. The other two servers are secondaries so you cannot write to them. How could you take advantage of four processes? –  Asya Kamsky Sep 27 '12 at 3:42
    
If your data is sharded, you should be connecting through the mongos. The mongos server routes your query to the appropriate server already. You could run a mongos on each physical machine and connect locally if the network traffic is a concern. Querying the config db and trying to manipulate the documents directly on each mongod sounds like a recipe for trouble ;-). –  Stennie Sep 27 '12 at 4:01

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