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I'm making an application using Java that saves and loads files, so I'm using streams. I get a stream from a file and then I use this stream to create a new file in another folder. The problem is, after using the stream and closing it, the memory that's supposed to have been freed is still there.

For example, I load a 100mb file (the task manager shows that java.exe increases in 100mb), then I save the file in another folder and close the stream with stream.close(). But java.exe doesn't decrease 100mb. When I save and load files several times, and java.exe exceedes 600mb, it then reduces to 300 mb. Every time it's about to exceed 600mb it reduces to 300mb. Why is this? Why can't the memory go to 0mb when I invoke stream.close() ? Why does it free memory when it's aroung 600mb, and it doesn't free all the memory?

This is how I load a stream from a string path and then close the stream:

String path = ... //File path
InputStream stream = new BufferedInputStream(new FileInputStream(path));
stream.close();

Thanks for your replies.

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3  
There's a chance that, if you decide to use that memory, it will simply be freed for you to use, which means that the "excessive" usage is irrelevant. Garbage collection doesn't always occur immediately; see javarevisited.blogspot.com/2011/04/… –  Robert Harvey Sep 26 '12 at 16:45
    
Releasing memory to the operating system is expensive. –  Thorbjørn Ravn Andersen Sep 26 '12 at 16:50
    
I was under the impression that Java will only very rarely release memory to the OS - definitely not during minor collections. This is based on the assumption that most software that needs X amount of memory at one point will need it again sooner or later. –  millimoose Sep 26 '12 at 16:57

3 Answers 3

BufferedInputStream uses a fixed size of 8 KB by default so it can't leak more than 8 KB (plus a little overhead)

I load a 100mb file (the task manager shows that java.exe increases in 100mb),

This means you are using 100 MB of objects to process the file.

But java.exe doesn't decrease 100mb

No reason it should. It most likely will after a GC but you don't want to be doing that unless you need to and I suspect you don't.

Every time it's about to exceed 600mb it reduces to 300mb. Why is this?

You have triggers a collection of garbage. Most likely a minor collection.

Why can't the memory go to 0mb when I invoke stream.close() ?

It wasn't 0 MB when it started, you will get the memory back when you GC, but you don't want to be doing that needlessly.

Why does it free memory when it's aroung 600mb, and it doesn't free all the memory?

It has multiple memory regions and it tried to do the simplest work possible which is usually cleaning the eden space.

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"Most likely a minor collection" - wouldn't a minor collection just free up the eden space. I was under the impression that during one the GC only moves survivors from eden to an older generation, to make all of Eden available again. Which means a minor collection would actually increase memory usage, not decrease it. (That said this is based on a vague recollection of an older HotSpot generational scavenger whitepaper / guide, things might be different now.) –  millimoose Sep 26 '12 at 17:00
    
minor collections free up the young generation which includes the survivor spaces. You will never end up with more data than you started with once the eden space has been cleared. –  Peter Lawrey Sep 26 '12 at 17:09
    
Yes, but will the collection also release the memory to the OS? –  millimoose Sep 26 '12 at 17:16
    
Generally not. The JVM reserves the virtual memory on startup. It can pass memory back to the OS, but this rarely happens for a running program. –  Peter Lawrey Sep 26 '12 at 17:17

What you see is the normal functioning of the Java memory system, the allocated memory is not necessarily given back to the OS.

Instead of checking the memory of java.exe on the OS level, you should use a memory analyzer such as the built-in JConsole tool (or the free Eclipse MAT for a deeper analysis).

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In your code FileInputStream is anonymous instance.

Due to large file, it may be stored in Virtual Memory/Virtual Ram. And it wouldnt close, until java starts garbage collections.

Create the FileInputStream as new named instance and close

It should work

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-1: There's no such thing at "anonymous instance" and "named instance" - there is no difference in behaviour that assigning the FileInputStream to a local variable would cause. BufferedInputStream closes the underlying buffered stream after a little cleanup. –  millimoose Sep 26 '12 at 16:54
    
I tried using it as a local variable and not, and the result is the same. Thanks anyway. –  Antonio López Sep 26 '12 at 16:56
2  
Answer is meaningless. –  EJP Sep 27 '12 at 0:41

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