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In c# it is possible to use default parameter values in a method, in example:

public void SomeMethod(String someString = "string value")
{
    Debug.WriteLine(someString);
}

But now I want to use an array as the parameter in the method, and set a default value for it.
I was thinking it should look something like this:

public void SomeMethod(String[] arrayString = {"value 1", "value 2", "value 3"})
{
    foreach(someString in arrayString)
    {
        Debug.WriteLine(someString);
    }
}

But this does not work.
Is there a correct way to do this, if this is even possible at all?

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Define "does not work". –  Tudor Sep 26 '12 at 17:27
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2 Answers

up vote 11 down vote accepted

Is there a correct way to do this, if this is even possible at all?

This is not possible (directly) as the default value must be one of the following (from Optional Arguments):

  • a constant expression;
  • an expression of the form new ValType(), where ValType is a value type, such as an enum or a struct;
  • an expression of the form default(ValType), where ValType is a value type.

Creating an array doesn't fit any of the possible default values for optional arguments.

The best option here is to make an overload:

public void SomeMethod()
{
    SomeMethod(new[] {"value 1", "value 2", "value 3"});
}


public void SomeMethod(String[] arrayString)
{
    foreach(someString in arrayString)
    {
        Debug.WriteLine(someString);
    }
}
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Ok, thanks. I will have a go at this. I will accept this as my answer in about 11 minutes. –  Gabi Barrientos Sep 26 '12 at 17:30
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Try this:

public void SomeMethod(String[] arrayString = null)
{
    arrayString = arrayString ?? {"value 1", "value 2", "value 3"};
    foreach(someString in arrayString)
    {
        Debug.WriteLine(someString);
    }
}
someMethod();
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your input. It seems like a good way to go, however I am going to stick with Reed's answer on this one because it comes in handy in some other ways as well for me. –  Gabi Barrientos Sep 26 '12 at 17:40
2  
+1 This is a slick approach, but it doesn't give you a way to differentiate between a user passing in null explicitly and just not using the parameter (which is why I typically prefer the overload approach). That may or may not be important in this case. –  Reed Copsey Sep 26 '12 at 17:42
    
You're welcome. –  Nathan Sep 26 '12 at 17:42
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