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repost from confused about git branches and master interaction.
I still don't get it!
I have 1 branch named 'miscChanges' in which I have made changes to some pages (I have not yet committed).Now, when I try to checkout the 'master' branch I get the message '...files would be overwritten by checkout. blah blah'.
I don't want to commit my changes on the 'miscChanges' branch because I'm not done.
What is the logical way to proceed in this case?

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up vote 1 down vote accepted

A branch is just a pointer (reference) to an existing commit ID. Changing the current branch means choosing a different pointer.

This means that uncommitted changes don't stay on the previous branch, since there's no place to store these changes. So, when changing branches, git tries to keep these changes in the new code base. To be more specific, any files from the working tree that differ from the last committed state on the old branch will be kept in the working tree after the checkout. But if those files differ between the old and the new branch, git will complain about incompatible changes: it can't keep the modified file in the working tree since the original file isn't the same.

There are three ways to solve this:

  1. Do a temporary commit which you later discard:
    1. git commit -a -m tmp
    2. git checkout master
    3. ... do your work on master ...
    4. git checkout miscChanges
    5. git reset HEAD~
  2. Do a temporary commit which you later improve:
    1. git commit -a -m tmp
    2. git checkout master
    3. ... do your work on master ...
    4. git checkout miscChanges
    5. ... do more work on the miscChanges branch ...
    6. git commit --amend
  3. Use the stash:
    1. git stash save 'work in progress on branch miscChanges'
    2. git checkout master
    3. ... do your work on master ...
    4. git checkout miscChanges
    5. git stash pop

If you save more than one stash, you can look up which one should be popped:

git stash list
# Find the right stash number, in the form stash@{N}
git stash pop stash@{3}
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Thanks for your detailed explanation! – Alex Sep 27 '12 at 12:33

You need to commit your changes first. Try git add -A (which adds all of the changes in your current directory, including new files and deleted files) and then git commit.

Basically, git is warning you that when you check out the master branch, it will overwrite all of the files in your working directory--including your uncommitted changes.

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Thanks for your quick reply! – Alex Sep 27 '12 at 12:34

First, to answer why you got the error message - when you check out a branch in git, it changes the files on disk to match the state of the branch. That would overwrite what you were working on, so it warned you.

Second, to answer what you should do about it - if you're in a hurry you can just do "git stash" which will save your changes temporarily while you look at the other branch. (You'll have to google how to unstash later.) The more complete way to handle it would be to create a new branch ("git checkout -b new_branch" if I recall) and commit your changes to that while you look at master. You can always pull or merge that temporary branch back to miscChanges and delete the temporary one.

Also remember that git is distributed source control. Your changes to miscChanges branch won't be seen by anyone else until you push them, so technically you could commit something incomplete and fix it before pushing, although your history would have a state in it where your feature is incomplete. You may be able to avoid that if you come back to miscChanges and do "git commit --amend ..." when you finish the feature.

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Thanks for your quick reply! – Alex Sep 27 '12 at 12:32

If you don't want to commit your changes yet, you have to do something with them. You can do a git stash, change branches, do whatever you need, then change back to your "miscChanges" branch and do git stash apply

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Thanks for your quick reply! – Alex Sep 27 '12 at 12:33

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