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I am using the ImageMagick convert utility right now. I have a PostScript file that takes about 90 seconds to convert to GIF.

I am looking for a faster way to do this perferably by modifying the options to "convert".

When I say "fast", ideally a few seconds but I'll take any significant speed up. Something suitable for an interactive GUI.

I only need this in black and white or greyscale (specifically it is is an image of seismic data "wiggle traces" so B&W is fine.)

Other acceptable formats are BMP, GIF, JPEG, JPG, PCX, PGM, PNG, PNM, PPM, RAS, TGA, TIF, or TIFF.

Trying to stick with ImageMagick as that is already installed and trying to avoid selling my boss on anything new. Still happy to hear other suggestions.

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90 seconds seems too much. How large is the image? How complex is the postscript program? –  lhf Sep 26 '12 at 18:00
2  
Can you provide (a link to) a sample PostScript file you're dealing with? –  Kurt Pfeifle Sep 26 '12 at 18:12
    
An interactive GUI? Sounds kind of like the goal of Display PostScript. –  Shark8 Nov 14 '12 at 2:38

2 Answers 2

My suggestion is: Use Ghostscript.

Since you have a working ImageMagick already installed, that means Ghostscript is also there: because ImageMagick cannot convert PDF or PostScript to raster images all by its own -- it has to call Ghostscript as its delegate to do this anyway.

Ghostscript can directly convert PDF/PostScript input to TIFF/TIF/TIFFg4, JPEG, PBM, PCX, PNG, PNM, PPM, BMP raster image output.

The advantages are: you don't need to have ImageMagick involved. So it's faster and also gives you more direct control over the conversion parameters. If you run Ghostscript via ImageMagick that's a level of indirection which isn't always required. (Sometimes it may be required to add some fine-tuning and post-processing manipulations to the raster image data that Ghostscript generated -- but that doesn't seem to be the case for you.)

The only disadvantage is: Ghostscript cannot produce GIF. If you required GIF (which you don't seem to), you need ImageMagick for post-processing the raster output of Ghostscript to GIF.

You can see how ImageMagick calls Ghostscript (and which parameters it uses for the call -- look for a printed line on stderr containing gs, gsx or gswin32c or gswin64c) by running for example:

 convert -verbose some.pdf[0] some.gif

Update

I did run a very, very un-scientific 'benchmark', running the following two commands 100 time each, which convert the randomly picked page 333 of the official PDF specification (ISO version for PDF-1.7) to GIF, measuring the time consumed. I run these commands in concurrently parallel, so both should have had to deal with the same overall system load, making the results better comparable:

  1. 'Comfortably' using ImageMagick's convert to directly produce GIF:

    time for i in $(seq -w 1 100); do
        convert                      \
           PDF32000_2008.pdf[333]    \
           p333-im-no_${i}.gif ;
    done
    
  2. Using Ghostscript to create from the same page grayscale PNGs, piping Ghostscript's output to ImageMagick's convert in order to get GIFs:

    time for i in $(seq -w 1 100); do
        gs                      \
          -q                    \
          -o -                  \
          -dFirstPage=333       \
          -dLastPage=333        \
          -sDEVICE=pnggray      \
           PDF32000_2008.pdf    \
        |                       \
        convert                 \
          -                     \
           p333-gs-no_${i}.gif ;
    done
    

Timing esults for the first command (running the 'comfortable' convert to achieve the PDF->GIF transformation, which uses Ghostscript only 'behind our backs'):

real  2m29.282s
user  2m22.526s
sys   0m5.647s

Timing results for the second command (running gs directly + openly, piping it's output to convert:

real  1m27.370s
user  1m23.447s
sys   0m3.435s

One more thing:

  • The total size of the 100 'Ghostscript'-GIFs was 1,6 MByte -- but they were 8-bit grayscale.

  • The total size of the 100 'ImageMagic-direct'-GIFs was 1,2 MByte -- but they were 2-bit black+white.

  • I don't have the motivation currently to tweak the test commandline parameters more for even closer comparability of the resulting files.

This result (149 seconds vs. 87 seconds) gives me enough confidence into my guess that you can gain significant performance improvements when you follow my recommendation. :-)

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"Ghostscript cannot produce GIF" So then there must be an extra step of converting whatever raster it tells Ghostscript to produce (say a TIFF) into a GIF. That I think would be a big chunk of the conversion time. Try a raster image format that Ghostscript converts to natively. –  ScottProuty Sep 26 '12 at 21:23
    
That may be the reason for the slowdown: imagemagick has to do an extra conversion of the gs output. –  luser droog Sep 26 '12 at 21:24
    
Well using Ghostscript has helped me understand the problem better: in order to get the quality I need, I have to use the option “-dGraphicsAlphaBits=4” to request high quality rendering. And that is where all the time is coming from. –  user1074069 Sep 26 '12 at 22:47
    
@user1074069: Your headline asked for 'the fastest way' of conversion. You 'need of quality' wasn't even mentioned! Instead you even compromised with color output and you was prepared to sacrifice it for b+w in order to gain speed. What gives? –  Kurt Pfeifle Sep 26 '12 at 23:28
    
@Kurt Pfeifle: I would have assumed that quality of the image is an inherent issue. Regardless, your comments did help me clarify the problem so gold star and a cookie to you! Thanks! Now I'll have to decide what trade off is acceptable. Might have to look into a more elaborate solution. –  user1074069 Sep 27 '12 at 14:25

I am using the ImageMagick convert utility right now. I have a PostScript file that takes about 90 seconds to convert to GIF.

I am looking for a faster way to do this perferably by modifying the options to "convert".

When I say "fast", ideally a few seconds but I'll take any significant speed up. Something suitable for an interactive GUI.

I only need this in black and white or greyscale (specifically it is is an image of seismic data "wiggle traces" so B&W is fine.)

You can start with GhostScript:

 gs -dSAFER -dBATCH -dNOPAUSE \
    -sDEVICE=pnggray -r300 -sOutputFile=seismic.png seismic.pdf

A very longer but interesting way would be to analyze exactly what is in those PDFs.

I had to do something similar with the PDF output of an EKG workflow. The original data were unavailable, we only had the PDF, but I discovered that the PDF was vector based and not raster. After a little hacking it was very easy to decode the labels, the legend and the single elementary lines making up the EKG diagram, and I came up with an option to recolor the tracks starting from what appeared a grayscale image. It did take several days, though.

It is possible that your PDF is generated in a similar way, and the data could be decoded (at first I had to use pdftk to get me a non-compressed PDF, then I found a library that I could use - it implemented the Deflate algorithm). It would be really cool to have output in SVG format :-)

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