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I try to display formatted text on the screen. At first the very simple HTML text is parsed (there are tags like b,u,i) and then each character is rendered using Canvas.TextOut function in appropriate position and font.

The first thing I noticed is, that rendering of every separate character on the canvas is rather slow. The rendering of whole sentence is much faster. It is obvious, when the canvas is forced to repaint, when form is moved around the screen.

One solution would be to cluster the characters with even fonts and render them at once. But it won't help too much, when the formatting is rich. In addition I need the characters to be the discrete entities, which could be rendered in any way. For example, there is no WinAPI to support text alignment taJustify or in block writing...

Another approach is to render on bitmap, or to use wisely ClipRect property of TCanvas (I haven't tried yet).

Anyway, when the same formatted text is displayed in TRichEdit, there is no time penalty by repaint operation. Another quick example are all major browsers, which has no problem to display tons of formated text... do they render each character like I do, but they do it more efficiently ??? I do not know.

So do you know some recipe to speeding up the application (formatted text rendering?).

Thanx for your ideas...

Sample code: (make TForm as big as possible, grab it with mouse and drag it down under screen. When you move it up, you will see "jumpy" movement)

procedure TForm1.FormPaint(Sender: TObject);
var i, w, h, j:integer;
    s:string;
    switch:Boolean;
begin
   w:=0;
   h:=0;
   s:='';
   for j:=0 to 5 do
       for i:=65 to 90 do s:=s + Char(i);

   switch:=False; // set true to see the difference

   if switch then
     begin
     for j:=0 to 70 do begin
         for i := 1 to Length(s) do
         begin
         Form1.Canvas.TextOut(50+ w,h +70 , s[i]);
         w:=w +  Form1.Canvas.TextWidth(s[i]);
         end;
         w:=0;
         h:=h+15;
         end;
     end
    else
      begin
      for j:=0 to 70 do begin
       Form1.Canvas.TextOut(50+ w,h +70 , s);
       w:=w +  Form1.Canvas.TextWidth(s);  // not optimalized just for comparison
       w:=0;                               // not optimalized just for comparison
       h:=h+15;
       end;
      end;
end;
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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

On my pc, it's about twice as fast when you render to a bitmap, and then draw that to the canvas. Well, the slow version becomes twice as fast. The fast version stays the same.

Another optimization that might work. You can also pre-calculate character widths into an array, so you don't have to call canvas.TextWidth() often.

Keep a variable like this

widths:array[char] of byte;

Fill it like this:

for c := low(widths) to high(widths) do
  widths[c] := Canvas.TextWidth(char(c));

Filling this 65536 element array is slow, so perhaps it's better to just create a 65..90 element-array, and drop unicode-support.

Another thing.. Calling Winapi.Windows.TextOut() is faster than canvas.TextOut().

You can actually win a lot with that.

    Winapi.Windows.TextOut(bmp.Canvas.Handle, w, h, @s[i], 1);

Modified version of your code:

// set up of off-screen bitmap.. needs to be resized when the form resizes. 
procedure TForm1.FormCreate(Sender: TObject);
begin
  bmp := TBitmap.Create;
  bmp.SetSize(width,height);
end;

This is

procedure TForm36.PaintIt2;
var h,i,j,w: Integer; s: string;
begin
  w := 0;  h := 0;  s := '';

  for j := 0 to 5 do
    for i := 65 to 90 do
      s := s + Char(i);

  bmp.Canvas.Brush.Color := Color;
  bmp.Canvas.FillRect(bmp.Canvas.ClipRect);
  if Checkbox1.Checked then
  begin
    for j := 0 to 70 do
    begin
      for i := 1 to Length(s) do
      begin
        Winapi.Windows.TextOut(bmp.Canvas.Handle, w, h, @s[i], 1);
        w := w + widths[s[i]];
      end;
      w := 0; h := h + 15;
    end;
  end
  else
    for j := 0 to 70 do
    begin
      bmp.Canvas.TextOut(w, h, s);
      w := 0; h := h + 15;
    end;
  canvas.Draw(0,0,bmp);
end;

I timed the performance with this procedure:

procedure TForm1.Button2Click(Sender: TObject);
var i : Integer; const iterations=300;
begin
  with TStopwatch.StartNew do
  begin
    for I := 1 to iterations do
      PaintIt2;
    Caption := IntToStr(Elapsed.Ticks div iterations);
  end;
end;

Last note:

I've tried disabling cleartype/anti-aliasing, but strangely enough that makes rendering twice as slow! This is how I turned anti-aliasing off:

  tagLOGFONT: TLogFont;

  GetObject(
    bmp.Canvas.Font.Handle,
    SizeOf(TLogFont),
    @tagLOGFONT);
  tagLOGFONT.lfQuality  := NONANTIALIASED_QUALITY;
  bmp.Canvas.Font.Handle := CreateFontIndirect(tagLOGFONT);
share|improve this answer
    
According to my measure, Windows.TextOut excel over Canvas.TextOut about 20 - 50 %. Drawing to bitmap.canvas is even faster, approximately 3 times over Form1.canvas. I assume, there is display penalty resulting from videocard actual showing. –  lyborko Sep 26 '12 at 20:14
    
and your first note: I cache character widths and heights in array, precounting them and then displaying in order to bypass unnecessary operations. Still this is not the bottle neck. Thanx anyway for your comment !!! –  lyborko Sep 26 '12 at 20:17
    
I just tried Graphics32 with an offscreen TBitmap32 and RenderText(), and I've tried TDirect2DCanvas, but both are actually slower than GDI. –  Wouter van Nifterick Sep 26 '12 at 20:34
    
Anyway, I've starred this question because I'm interested in this type of optimization. I use TextOut for map rendering (streetnames, city names, etc), and drawing text is a bit of a bottleneck, especially because I draw each text 5 times to mimic outlines (first 4 black ones in surrouding pixels, and finally a white one in the middle) –  Wouter van Nifterick Sep 26 '12 at 20:38
    
-1 Caching width and heightand drawing individual characters is a weird idea of optimization. Position of adjacent characters depend on the pairing of characters. This is known as kerning in typography. You will also loose any ligature feature of your true type font. It will also fail when working with Unicode diacritics or complex scripting (when the layout order is not the logical order). About outlines, you can try to get the vectorial path of the text, then change the pen before drawing it. –  Arnaud Bouchez Sep 27 '12 at 5:32

To avoid flicker, have best performance and still have all advanced text rendering features (like kerning), the answer is using a temporary bitmap.

Drawing text is very fast in Windows, but displaying a pre-computed bitmap will be much faster.

You can divide your layout to render only the shown part of the text. Or try to split your text into "boxes" of text (just like the great TeX engine does), using a cache for the width of each box. But Windows itself does such caching, so only use such technique if you find a real bottleneck, via proper profiling of the whole code.

Do not reinvent the wheel. On real content, you will find out that text rendering is much more complex than imagined, e.g. if you mix languages and layouts (Arabic and English for instance). You should better rely on Windows, e.g. its UniScribe API, for such complex work. When we made our open source pdf engine, we re-used it as much as possible.

For instance, FireMonkey suffers from reinventing the wheel, and fails when rendering complex text content. So using existing APIs is IMHO the best path...

share|improve this answer
    
I am not very proud on reinventing the wheel, but I have not choice (AFAIK). Yes, I was thinking to draw on the bitmap, but I am in doubts, if Word or IE do it this way. I guess no... I keep in mind win API are fast, even TextWidth is fast, really fast. So I see, you propose the tricky optimalization... –  lyborko Sep 26 '12 at 19:55
    
I'm quite sure 90% of modern applications (including IE/Word) use such a double buffering. Otherwise, you'll get some flicker at rendering. You can use a DirectX buffer instead of a bitmap (like WCF or FireMonkey), but it is not worth it in your case, I suspect. Windows is very efficient at rendering text into a bitmap. –  Arnaud Bouchez Sep 27 '12 at 5:35

Use a profiler, such as AQTime, to find where your code is actually spending its time. Chances are that it will not be TextOut() itself that is taking the most time. You are indexing through a String one character at a time, passing each character to TextOut() and TextWidth(). Neither of those methods accept Char parameters as input, they only take String input instead, so the RTL is spending effort allocating and freeing a lot of temporary Strings in memory, depending on how long your source String is. I've seen things like that kill loop performance.

share|improve this answer
    
Just for now I can say, that iterating through string and passing the char to textwidth function lasts approximately 2.6 times longer as textwidth function with fixed string. But does it explain it: start := GetTickCount; s:='0123456789'; for j:=0 to 1000000 do for i:=1 to Length(s) do begin //w:=Form1.Canvas.TextWidth( s[i]); w:=Form1.Canvas.TextWidth( 'd'); end; stop := GetTickCount; elapsed := stop - start; ShowMessage(IntToStr(elapsed)); –  lyborko Sep 26 '12 at 18:49
    
@lyborko The API has a cache feature, you just discovered. It just signify that you can rely on it for performance. –  Arnaud Bouchez Sep 26 '12 at 19:23
    
Passing an actual Char variable to TextWidth() (or any String parameter in general) will allocate and free a temporary String in memory. On the other hand, passing a literal will not allocate a temporary String at all. You can verify that for yourself by looking at the machine code that the compiler generates under both scenarios. The compiler will store the literal data in a format that can be passed to a String parameter as-is without allocating any memory. Memory management can drastically slow down a loop if it is not optimized for that loop. –  Remy Lebeau Sep 26 '12 at 20:11
    
I tried to use TStringStream instead of s[i], but there was no difference... but that is not exactly what you mean, I suppose... –  lyborko Sep 26 '12 at 20:23
    
If you are using D2009+, TStringStream is going to allocate a temporary String every time you retreive its DataString. If you really want to pass a Char to TextWidth() inside a loop, you are better off pre-allocating a 1-Char String before entering the loop, then have the loop insert the Char into the String each time, eg: var tmp: string; SetLength(tmp, 1); for ... do begin tmp[1] := s[i]; w := w + TextWidth(tmp); end;... –  Remy Lebeau Sep 26 '12 at 21:42

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