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What regex can I use to match ".#,#." within a string. It may or may not exist in the string. Some examples with expected outputs might be:

Test1.0,0.csv      -> ('Test1', '0,0', 'csv')         (Basic Example)
Test2.wma          -> ('Test2', 'wma')                (No Match)
Test3.1100,456.jpg -> ('Test3', '1100,456', 'jpg')    (Basic with Large Number)
T.E.S.T.4.5,6.png  -> ('T.E.S.T.4', '5,6', 'png')     (Doesn't strip all periods)
Test5,7,8.sss      -> ('Test5,7,8', 'sss')            (No Match)
Test6.2,3,4.png    -> ('Test6.2,3,4', 'png')          (No Match, to many commas)
Test7.5,6.7,8.test -> ('Test7', '5,6', '7,8', 'test') (Double Match?)

The last one isn't too important and I would only expect that .#,#. would appear once. Most files I'm processing, I would expect to fall into the first through fourth examples, so I'm most interested in those.

Thanks for the help!

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4  
Awww man. If only everyone would provide such an extensive list of examples that match and examples that fail... –  Martin Büttner Sep 26 '12 at 18:35
    
@m.buettner I know, this is beautiful in comparison to 99% of regex questions –  JKirchartz Sep 26 '12 at 18:39

6 Answers 6

up vote 3 down vote accepted

To allow for multiple consecutive matches, use lookahead/lookbehind:

r'(?<=\.)\d+,\d+(?=\.)'

Example:

>>> re.findall(r'(?<=\.)\d+,\d+(?=\.)', 'Test7.5,6.7,8.test')
['5,6', '7,8']

We can also use lookahead to perform the split as you want it:

import re
def split_it(s):
    pieces = re.split(r'\.(?=\d+,\d+\.)', s)
    pieces[-1:] = pieces[-1].rsplit('.', 1) # split off extension
    return pieces

Testing:

>>> print split_it('Test1.0,0.csv')
['Test1', '0,0', 'csv']
>>> print split_it('Test2.wma')
['Test2', 'wma']
>>> print split_it('Test3.1100,456.jpg')
['Test3', '1100,456', 'jpg']
>>> print split_it('T.E.S.T.4.5,6.png')
['T.E.S.T.4', '5,6', 'png']
>>> print split_it('Test5,7,8.sss')
['Test5,7,8', 'sss']
>>> print split_it('Test6.2,3,4.png')
['Test6.2,3,4', 'png']
>>> print split_it('Test7.5,6.7,8.test')
['Test7', '5,6', '7,8', 'test']
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+1, this is a nice use of lookaheads. –  Andrew Clark Sep 26 '12 at 19:01
    
Ya, very nice use of lookahead, thanks! –  Scott B Sep 27 '12 at 19:46

You can use the regex \.\d+,\d+\. to find all matches for that pattern, but you will need to do a little extra to get the output you expect, especially since you want to treat .5,6.7,8. as two matches.

Here is one potential solution:

def transform(s):
    s = re.sub(r'(\.\d+,\d+)+\.', lambda m: m.group(0).replace('.', '\n'), s)
    return tuple(s.split('\n'))

Examples:

>>> transform('Test1.0,0.csv')
('Test1', '0,0', 'csv')
>>> transform('Test2.wma')
('Test2.wma',)
>>> transform('Test3.1100,456.jpg')
('Test3', '1100,456', 'jpg')
>>> transform('T.E.S.T.4.5,6.png')
('T.E.S.T.4', '5,6', 'png')
>>> transform('Test5,7,8.sss')
('Test5,7,8.sss',)
>>> transform('Test6.2,3,4.png')
('Test6.2,3,4.png',)
>>> transform('Test7.5,6.7,8.test')
('Test7', '5,6', '7,8', 'test')

To also get the file extension split off when there are no matches, you can use the following:

def transform(s):
    s = re.sub(r'(\.\d+,\d+)+\.', lambda m: m.group(0).replace('.', '\n'), s)
    groups = s.split('\n')
    groups[-1:] = groups[-1].rsplit('.', 1)
    return tuple(groups)

This will be the same output as above except that 'Test2.wma' becomes ('Test2', 'wma'), with similar behavior for 'Test5,7,8.sss' and 'Test5,7,8.sss'.

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I was gonna suggest that... here's a link to a demo: regexr.com?329f8 –  JKirchartz Sep 26 '12 at 18:46
    
Doesn't quite work if there are spaces in the name... –  nneonneo Sep 26 '12 at 18:53
    
Also if the last group contains more than one . you will end up splitting the last group several times. –  nneonneo Sep 26 '12 at 18:54
    
Just modified it to use \n instead of a space, you could also use something like \x00 to be more sure it won't be included in a valid string. –  Andrew Clark Sep 26 '12 at 18:56
    
transform('.a.a.a.a.a.a.') == ('', 'a', 'a', 'a', 'a', 'a', 'a', '') –  nneonneo Sep 26 '12 at 18:57
'/^(.+)\.((\d+,\d+)\.)?(.+)$/'

The third capturing group should contain the pair of numbers. If you have multiple of those pairs, you should get multiple matches. And the third capturing would always contain the pair.

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^(.*?)\.(\d+,\d+)\.(.*?)$

This passes your tests, at least in Patterns:

Passing tests in Patterns

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What's Patterns? –  Burhan Khalid Sep 26 '12 at 19:26
    

This is pretty close, does python support named groups?

^.*(?P<group1>\d+(?:,\d+)?)\.(?P<group2>\d+(?:,\d+)?).*\..+$
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The named group syntax is (?P<name>pattern) –  David Eyk Sep 26 '12 at 18:48

Use regex pattern ^([^,]+)\.(\d+,\d+)\.([^,.]+)$

Check this demo >>

>>> print re.findall(r'^([^,]+)\.(\d+,\d+)\.([^,.]+)$', 'Test1.0,0.csv')
[('Test1', '0,0', 'csv')]

>>> print re.findall(r'^([^,]+)\.(\d+,\d+)\.([^,.]+)$', 'Test2.wma')
[]

>>> print re.findall(r'^([^,]+)\.(\d+,\d+)\.([^,.]+)$', 'Test3.1100,456.jpg')
[('Test3', '1100,456', 'jpg')]

>>> print re.findall(r'^([^,]+)\.(\d+,\d+)\.([^,.]+)$', 'T.E.S.T.4.5,6.png')
[('T.E.S.T.4', '5,6', 'png')]

>>> print re.findall(r'^([^,]+)\.(\d+,\d+)\.([^,.]+)$', 'Test5,7,8.sss')
[]

>>> print re.findall(r'^([^,]+)\.(\d+,\d+)\.([^,.]+)$', 'Test6.2,3,4.png')
[]

>>> print re.findall(r'^([^,]+)\.(\d+,\d+)\.([^,.]+)$', 'Test7.5,6.7,8.test') 
[]
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What does this produce for: Test.xx,yz.csv? –  Dave Sep 26 '12 at 18:46

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