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What's the purpose of if statement in a custom setter? I see this routine a lot in sample code. Provided using ARC, why bother checking the equality?

- (void)setPhotoDatabase:(UIManagedDocument *)photoDatabase
{
    if (_photoDatabase != photoDatabase) {
        _photoDatabase = photoDatabase;
        ...
    }
}
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up vote 2 down vote accepted

The important part is typically what follows the change (what's in ...): side-effects after assigning new value, which can be very costly.

It's a good idea to restrict those changes to avoid triggering unnecessary and potentially very costly side effects. say you change a document, well you will likely need to change a good percentage of the the ui related to that document, as well as model changes.

When the conditions are checked, a significant amount of unnecessary/changes work may be short circuited, which could wind up avoiding making unnecessary changes.

such unnecessary side effects could easily eclipse your app's real work regarding CPU, drawing, object creation, writes to disk -- pretty much anything.

believe it or not, a lot of apps do perform significant amounts of unnecessary work, even if they are very well designed. drawing and ui updates in view-based rendering systems are probably the best example i can think of. in that domain, there are a ton of details one could implement to minimize redundant drawing.

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One of the main reasons to override and implement custom setters is to execute additional code in response to changes of the property. If the property doesn't actually change, why execute that code?

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The answer is usually in the ... section that you have commented out: when there is nothing there, the code makes no sense. However, a typical thing to have in that spot is some sort of notification of your own delegate, like this:

[myDelegate photoDatabaseDidChanged:photoDatabase];

This should not be called unless the photoDatabase has indeed changed. The call may be costly, anywhere from "expensive" to "very expensive", depending on what the delegate really does. It could be updating a screen with the images from the new library, or it could be saving new images into the cloud. If there is no need to report the change, you could be wasting the CPU cycles, along with the battery and the network bandwidth. Your code has no way of knowing what the delegate is going to do, so you need to avoid calling back unless the change did happen.

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If you check for equality you can prevent the redundant assignment of the parameter that is passed into the method.

This way you can avoid the cost (even if it's small) of doing all the code within the brackets if there is no change to the photoDatabase in your sample method.

Ex (Extending your example):

- (void)setPhotoDatabase:(UIManagedDocument *)photoDatabase
{
    if (_photoDatabase != photoDatabase) 
    {
        _photoDatabase = photoDatabase;

        // do stuff
        // do more stuff
        // do even more stuff
        // do something really expensive
    }
}

As you can see from the example, if you check first to see if the photoDatabase doesn't equal what is passed in, you can just exit the method and not run additional code that isn't necessary.

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