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I've done a lot of work since my last question, so I thought it would be fitting to start a new question to have a clean slate. If this is the wrong way to do it, please let me know. (I'm new!)

Here is my code:

int do_command(char **args){

    // In the end, this function should take an array of args
    // and separate them into UNIX commands that lie before and after
    // pipes that are entered and put them into an array called
    // arrayOfCommands.
    // For example, if the char array args comes in 
    // with {"ls", "-1", "|", "wc"}, there would be two commands
    // which would be "ls -l" and "wc"

    // The following number is in my real program, 
    // but using the contents of args above, there will be two
    // commands ("ls -l" and "wc" separated by a pipe)
    // The number is found dynamically by looking for the number
    // of pipes earlier (in our examples so far, just one) and 
    // simply adding one since there has to be a command on either
    // side of the pipe or an error is thrown.
    const int commands = 2;

    // I want to create an array that is 2 wide (int commands)
    // and 5 tall (just a constant number because I don't know
    // how many flags a user will enter after each UNIX command
    //
    //  0 1 
    // 0[][]
    // 1[][]
    // 2[][]
    // 3[][]
    // 4[][]
    //
    // Each column holds a UNIX command (Ex: "ls -s")
    // In this example, "ls" would be stored in arrayOfCommands[0][0];
    // And "-l" would be stored in arrayOfCommands[0][1];
    //
    // If there are more than one command (Ex: "ls -s | wc")
    // They would be stored like this:
    // "ls" in arrayOfCommands[0][0];
    // "-l" in arrayOfCommands[0][1];
    // "wc" in arrayOfCommands[1][0];

    char arrayOfCommands[commands][5]; //!!! (Declaration)

    //counts which column in arrayOfCommands we are on
    int commandNum = 0;

    //Counts which part of a command we are on
    int count = 0;

    //Array Counters
    int i = 0;
    int j;

    //Go through args until we reach the end
    while (args[i] != NULL){
        //if we find something that's not a pipe...
        if(strcmp(args[i], "|")){
            //put it into the array of commands
            arrayOfCommands[commandNum][count] = args[i]; \\!!! (Copying)
            count++;
        }
        //otherwise if we find a pipe...
        else if (!strcmp(args[i], "|")) {
            //we know we are done with that command
            count = 0;
            commandNum++;
        }
        //Looking at the next value in args
        i++;
    }

    //Print the new arrayOfCommands
    int col=0;
    int row=0;
    for (col=0;col<commands;col++){
        printf("Command #%d: ",col);
        for (row=0;row<10;row++){
            printf("%c ",arrayOfCommands[col][row]); \\!!! (Printing)
        }
        printf("\n");
    }
}

I've commented the code like crazy to help everyone understand my code. To explain further, I am creating a UNIX Shell with C. My program takes in UNIX commands in the form of user input and put them into an array called "args", separated by spaces.

The code above is working specifically with piping and seeks to further separate the code into commands that fall before and after pipes ("|"). Go ahead and ask questions and I'll do my best to help explain my thought process.

I think I have the coding part somewhat correct, but when I try to print the arrayOfCommands, I get something like:

Command 0: % # ! ##$
Command 1: * ^@ @!
(These are the actual symbols, of course)

I've put "//!!!" behind the lines that I assume are causing the problem.

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closed as too localized by Pascal Cuoq, Tichodroma, Erick Robertson, skolima, Adam Wagner Sep 27 '12 at 17:00

This question is unlikely to help any future visitors; it is only relevant to a small geographic area, a specific moment in time, or an extraordinarily narrow situation that is not generally applicable to the worldwide audience of the internet. For help making this question more broadly applicable, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If you look at:

char arrayOfCommands[commands][5]; //!!! (Declaration)
...
arrayOfCommands[commandNum][count] = args[i]; \\!!! (Copying) 

You are assigning a char* into a char.

C strings are character arrays. That means you have a pointer to a series of chars terminated by a NUL character. What args[i] will return is the memory address of that starting character. So your "copy" is simply assigning an unsigned int memory address into an element in an array that is designated as a character. It will truncate that unsigned int (32 bits) into a `character (8 bits). This is probably why you're seeing weird values.

If you want to store your commands as you indicated, you'll have to change arrayOfCommands from a 2-dimensional char array into a 2-dimensional char * array. Furthermore, if you want to actually copy the strings, and not just create pointer aliases to each string in the args[] array, you will have to either allocate each element of your 2-dimensional array using malloc() (and then free the memory when you're done, using free()) or choose a fixed maximum size and allocate it on the stack. I'd probably do the latter for simplicity in a program like this:

char arrayOfCommands[2][5][256];  // 5 rows, 2 columns, maximum command length of 255 characters + NUL character

Then, when you do the copy, you will have to use a string copy function:

strcpy(arrayOfCommands[row][column], args[i]); // Copy string at args[i] into arrayOfCommands[row][column]

This should fix the issues you're encountering.

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figured it out. I decided to go a 1D array route rather than a 2D way. The code now takes args, which were split before as "ls" "-l" "|" "wc" and separates them based on if there is a pipe into a new array called "arrayOfCommands". The contents of arrayOfCommands are then, once this is through, "ls -l" and "wc". Here's the code:

int do_command(char **args,) {
const int commands = 2;
int i = 0;

int commandNum = 0;
int firstCommand = 1;

char *arrayOfCommands[commands];

//Go through args until we reach the end
while (args[i] != NULL){
    //First case            
    if(firstCommand){
        arrayOfCommands[commandNum] = args[i];
        firstCommand = 0;
    }
    //Rest of the cases
    else{
        //if we find something that's not a pipe...
        if(strcmp(args[i], "|")){
            //Add a space to what was a previous part of the same command
            arrayOfCommands[commandNum] = strcat(arrayOfCommands[commandNum]," ");
            arrayOfCommands[commandNum] = strcat(arrayOfCommands[commandNum],args[i]);
        }
        //But if we do find a pipe...
        else if (!strcmp(args[i], "|")) {
            //We know it's time for a new command
            commandNum++;
            firstCommand = 1;
        }               
    }
    //Looking at the next value in args
    i++;
}

for(i = 0; i < commands; i++)
    printf("Command #[%d]: %s\n", i, arrayOfCommands[i]);
}
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