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I am trying to fix how python plots my data.

Say

x = [0,5,9,10,15]

and

y = [0,1,2,3,4]

Then I would do:

matplotlib.pyplot.plot(x,y)
matplotlib.pyplot.show()

and the x axis' ticks are plotted in intervals of 5. Is there a way to make it show intervals of 1?

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Though ticks is the appropriate word here, change ticks to step size will definitely guide more newbies to this question. –  Sibbs Gambling Nov 18 '13 at 16:01
1  
Closely related question: stackoverflow.com/questions/6682784/… and a great solution: pyplot.locator_params(nbins=4) –  Jan-Philip Gehrcke Apr 8 at 11:49

3 Answers 3

up vote 41 down vote accepted

You could explicitly set where you want to tick marks with plt.xticks:

plt.xticks(np.arange(min(x), max(x)+1, 1.0))

For example,

import numpy as np
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt

x = [0,5,9,10,15]
y = [0,1,2,3,4]
plt.plot(x,y)
plt.xticks(np.arange(min(x), max(x)+1, 1.0))
plt.show()

(np.arange was used rather than Python's range function just in case min(x) and max(x) are floats instead of ints.)


The plt.plot (or ax.plot) function will automatically set default x and y limits. If you wish to keep those limits, and just change the stepsize of the tick marks, then you could use ax.get_xlim() to discover what limits Matplotlib has already set.

start, end = ax.get_xlim()
ax.xaxis.set_ticks(np.arange(start, end, stepsize))

The default tick formatter should do a decent job rounding the tick values to a sensible number of significant digits. However, if you wish to have more control over the format, you can define your own formatter. For example,

ax.xaxis.set_major_formatter(ticker.FormatStrFormatter('%0.1f'))

Here's a runnable example:

import numpy as np
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
import matplotlib.ticker as ticker

x = [0,5,9,10,15]
y = [0,1,2,3,4]
fig, ax = plt.subplots()
ax.plot(x,y)
start, end = ax.get_xlim()
ax.xaxis.set_ticks(np.arange(start, end, 0.712123))
ax.xaxis.set_major_formatter(ticker.FormatStrFormatter('%0.1f'))
plt.show()
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4  
Is there no way to get it to still decide it's own limits, but just change the step size? This method is not very good if the min is something like 3523.232512! –  Corone Oct 1 '13 at 16:41

Another approach is to set the axis locator:

import matplotlib.ticker as plticker

loc = plticker.MultipleLocator(base=1.0) # this locator puts ticks at regular intervals
ax.xaxis.set_major_locator(loc)

There are several different types of locator depending upon your needs.

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1  
This does not work as expected. Specifically, when using dates, it does not use the appropriate dates. –  Chris Fonnesbeck Feb 5 at 17:02
3  
When using dates, you should use the methods in the matplotlib.dates module. For example matplotlib.dates.AutoDateLocator() –  robochat Mar 20 at 13:06

This is an old topic, but I stumble over this every now and then and made this function. It's very convenient:

import matplotlib.pyplot as pp
import numpy as np

def resadjust(ax, xres=5, yres=5):
"""Send in an axis and I fix the resolution as desired."""

    start, stop = ax.get_xlim()
    ticks = np.arange(start, stop + xres, xres)
    ax.set_xticks(ticks)
    start, stop = ax.get_ylim()
    ticks = np.arange(start, stop + yres, yres)
    ax.set_yticks(ticks)

    pp.show()

One caveat of controlling the ticks like this is that one does no longer enjoy the interactive automagic updating of max scale after an added line. Then do

gca().set_ylim(top=new_top) # for example

and run the resadjust function again.

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