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For some integer type, how can I find the value that is closest to some value of a floating-point type even when the floating point value is far outside the representable range of the integer.

Or more precisely:

Let F be a floating-point type (probably float, double, or long double). Let I be an integer type.

Assume that both F and I have valid specializations of std::numeric_limits<>.

Given a representable value of F, and using only C++03, how can I find the closest representable value of I?

I am after in a pure, efficient, and thread-safe solution, and one that assumes nothing about the platform except what is guaranteed by C++03.

If such an solution does not exist, is it possible to find one using the new features of C99/C++11?

Using lround() of C99 seems to be problematic due to the non-trivial way in which domain errors are reported. Can these domain errors be caught in a portable and thread-safe way?

Note: I am aware that Boost probably offers a solution via its boost::numerics::converter<> template, but due to its high complexity and verbosity, and I have not been able to extract the essentials from it, and therefore I have not been able to check whether their solution makes assumptions beyond C++03.

The following naive approach fails due to the fact that the result of I(f) is undefined by C++03 when the integral part of f is not a representable value of I.

template<class I, class F> I closest_int(F f)
{
  return I(f);
}

Consider then the following approach:

template<class I, class F> I closest_int(F f)
{
  if (f < std::numeric_limits<I>::min()) return std::numeric_limits<I>::min();
  if (std::numeric_limits<I>::max() < f) return std::numeric_limits<I>::max();
  return I(f);
}

This also fails because the integral parts of F(std::numeric_limits<I>::min()) and F(std::numeric_limits<I>::max()) may still not be representable in I.

Finally consider this third approach which also fails:

template<class I, class F> I closest_int(F f)
{
  if (f <= std::numeric_limits<I>::min()) return std::numeric_limits<I>::min();
  if (std::numeric_limits<I>::max() <= f) return std::numeric_limits<I>::max();
  return I(f);
}

This time I(f) will always have a well-defined result, however, since F(std::numeric_limits<I>::max()) may be much smaller than std::numeric_limits<I>::max(), it is possible that we will return std::numeric_limits<I>::max() for a floating-point value that is multiple integer values below std::numeric_limits<I>::max().

Note that all the trouble arises because it is undefined whether the conversion F(i) rounds up, or down to the closest representable floating-point value.

Here is the relevant section from C++03 (4.9 Floating-integral conversions):

An rvalue of an integer type or of an enumeration type can be converted to an rvalue of a floating point type. The result is exact if possible. Otherwise, it is an implementation-defined choice of either the next lower or higher representable value.

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1  
Nicely written question. I wish they all looked like this. –  Robert Harvey Sep 26 '12 at 20:09
    
@AlexeyFrunze I want 'float -> int', however, in my feeble attempts to do that, I convert the maximum and minimum integers to floats, and the quote was meant to illuminate that latter conversion in the reverse direction. I'll try to make an edit that makes this more clear. –  Kristian Spangsege Sep 26 '12 at 23:36
    
@AlexeyFrunze Did you remove your question again? Or did I mess up something? –  Kristian Spangsege Sep 26 '12 at 23:37
    
Sorry, I deleted the comment once I had understood the problem. –  Alexey Frunze Sep 26 '12 at 23:49
    
I know this isn't central to your issue, but shouldn't you be using I(f+0.5) if you want the closest integer instead of the truncated integer part? –  Vaughn Cato Sep 27 '12 at 5:02

1 Answer 1

I have a practical solution for radix-2 (binary) floating-point types and integer types up to and longer than 64-bit. See below. The comments should be clear. Output follows.

// file: f2i.cpp
//
// compiled with MinGW x86 (gcc version 4.6.2) as:
//   g++ -Wall -O2 -std=c++03 f2i.cpp -o f2i.exe
#include <iostream>
#include <iomanip>
#include <limits>

using namespace std;

template<class I, class F> I truncAndCap(F f)
{
/*
  This function converts (by truncating the
  fractional part) the floating-point value f (of type F)
  into an integer value (of type I), avoiding undefined
  behavior by returning std::numeric_limits<I>::min() and
  std::numeric_limits<I>::max() when f is too small or
  too big to be converted to type I directly.

  2 problems:
  - F may fail to convert to I,
    which is undefined behavior and we want to avoid that.
  - I may not convert exactly into F
    - Direct I & F comparison fails because of I to F promotion,
      which can be inexact.

  This solution is for the most practical case when I and F
  are radix-2 (binary) integer and floating-point types.
*/
  int Idigits = numeric_limits<I>::digits;
  int Isigned = numeric_limits<I>::is_signed;

/*
  Calculate cutOffMax = 2 ^ std::numeric_limits<I>::digits
  (where ^ denotes exponentiation) as a value of type F.

  We assume that F is a radix-2 (binary) floating-point type AND
  it has a big enough exponent part to hold the value of
  std::numeric_limits<I>::digits.

  FLT_MAX_10_EXP/DBL_MAX_10_EXP/LDBL_MAX_10_EXP >= 37
  (guaranteed per C++ standard from 2003/C standard from 1999)
  corresponds to log2(1e37) ~= 122, so the type I can contain
  up to 122 bits. In practice, integers longer than 64 bits
  are extremely rare (if existent at all), especially on old systems
  of the 2003 C++ standard's time.
*/
  const F cutOffMax = F(I(1) << Idigits / 2) * F(I(1) << (Idigits / 2 + Idigits % 2));

  if (f >= cutOffMax)
    return numeric_limits<I>::max();

/*
  Calculate cutOffMin = - 2 ^ std::numeric_limits<I>::digits
  (where ^ denotes exponentiation) as a value of type F for
  signed I's OR cutOffMin = 0 for unsigned I's in a similar fashion.
*/
  const F cutOffMin = Isigned ? -F(I(1) << Idigits / 2) * F(I(1) << (Idigits / 2 + Idigits % 2)) : 0;

  if (f <= cutOffMin)
    return numeric_limits<I>::min();

/*
  Mathematically, we may still have a little problem (2 cases):
    cutOffMin < f < std::numeric_limits<I>::min()
    srd::numeric_limits<I>::max() < f < cutOffMax

  These cases are only possible when f isn't a whole number, when
  it's either std::numeric_limits<I>::min() - value in the range (0,1)
  or std::numeric_limits<I>::max() + value in the range (0,1).

  We can ignore this altogether because converting f to type I is
  guaranteed to truncate the fractional part off, and therefore
  I(f) will always be in the range
  [std::numeric_limits<I>::min(), std::numeric_limits<I>::max()].
*/

  return I(f);
}

template<class I, class F> void test(const char* msg, F f)
{
  I i = truncAndCap<I,F>(f);
  cout <<
    msg <<
    setiosflags(ios_base::showpos) <<
    setw(14) << setprecision(12) <<
    f << " -> " <<
    i <<
    resetiosflags(ios_base::showpos) <<
    endl;
}

#define TEST(I,F,VAL) \
  test<I,F>(#F " -> " #I ": ", VAL);

int main()
{
  TEST(short, float,     -1.75f);
  TEST(short, float,     -1.25f);
  TEST(short, float,     +0.00f);
  TEST(short, float,     +1.25f);
  TEST(short, float,     +1.75f);

  TEST(short, float, -32769.00f);
  TEST(short, float, -32768.50f);
  TEST(short, float, -32768.00f);
  TEST(short, float, -32767.75f);
  TEST(short, float, -32767.25f);
  TEST(short, float, -32767.00f);
  TEST(short, float, -32766.00f);
  TEST(short, float, +32766.00f);
  TEST(short, float, +32767.00f);
  TEST(short, float, +32767.25f);
  TEST(short, float, +32767.75f);
  TEST(short, float, +32768.00f);
  TEST(short, float, +32768.50f);
  TEST(short, float, +32769.00f);

  TEST(int, float, -2147483904.00f);
  TEST(int, float, -2147483648.00f);
  TEST(int, float, -16777218.00f);
  TEST(int, float, -16777216.00f);
  TEST(int, float, -16777215.00f);
  TEST(int, float, +16777215.00f);
  TEST(int, float, +16777216.00f);
  TEST(int, float, +16777218.00f);
  TEST(int, float, +2147483648.00f);
  TEST(int, float, +2147483904.00f);

  TEST(int, double, -2147483649.00);
  TEST(int, double, -2147483648.00);
  TEST(int, double, -2147483647.75);
  TEST(int, double, -2147483647.25);
  TEST(int, double, -2147483647.00);
  TEST(int, double, +2147483647.00);
  TEST(int, double, +2147483647.25);
  TEST(int, double, +2147483647.75);
  TEST(int, double, +2147483648.00);
  TEST(int, double, +2147483649.00);

  TEST(unsigned, double,          -1.00);
  TEST(unsigned, double,          +1.00);
  TEST(unsigned, double, +4294967295.00);
  TEST(unsigned, double, +4294967295.25);
  TEST(unsigned, double, +4294967295.75);
  TEST(unsigned, double, +4294967296.00);
  TEST(unsigned, double, +4294967297.00);

  return 0;
}

Output (ideone prints the same as my PC):

float -> short:          -1.75 -> -1
float -> short:          -1.25 -> -1
float -> short:             +0 -> +0
float -> short:          +1.25 -> +1
float -> short:          +1.75 -> +1
float -> short:         -32769 -> -32768
float -> short:       -32768.5 -> -32768
float -> short:         -32768 -> -32768
float -> short:      -32767.75 -> -32767
float -> short:      -32767.25 -> -32767
float -> short:         -32767 -> -32767
float -> short:         -32766 -> -32766
float -> short:         +32766 -> +32766
float -> short:         +32767 -> +32767
float -> short:      +32767.25 -> +32767
float -> short:      +32767.75 -> +32767
float -> short:         +32768 -> +32767
float -> short:       +32768.5 -> +32767
float -> short:         +32769 -> +32767
float -> int:    -2147483904 -> -2147483648
float -> int:    -2147483648 -> -2147483648
float -> int:      -16777218 -> -16777218
float -> int:      -16777216 -> -16777216
float -> int:      -16777215 -> -16777215
float -> int:      +16777215 -> +16777215
float -> int:      +16777216 -> +16777216
float -> int:      +16777218 -> +16777218
float -> int:    +2147483648 -> +2147483647
float -> int:    +2147483904 -> +2147483647
double -> int:    -2147483649 -> -2147483648
double -> int:    -2147483648 -> -2147483648
double -> int: -2147483647.75 -> -2147483647
double -> int: -2147483647.25 -> -2147483647
double -> int:    -2147483647 -> -2147483647
double -> int:    +2147483647 -> +2147483647
double -> int: +2147483647.25 -> +2147483647
double -> int: +2147483647.75 -> +2147483647
double -> int:    +2147483648 -> +2147483647
double -> int:    +2147483649 -> +2147483647
double -> unsigned:             -1 -> 0
double -> unsigned:             +1 -> 1
double -> unsigned:    +4294967295 -> 4294967295
double -> unsigned: +4294967295.25 -> 4294967295
double -> unsigned: +4294967295.75 -> 4294967295
double -> unsigned:    +4294967296 -> 4294967295
double -> unsigned:    +4294967297 -> 4294967295
share|improve this answer
    
I take that [comment] back. Assembly output looks reasonable. At first the compiler inlined the call to truncAndCap(), which is why I saw a lot of irrelevant stuff (related to std::cout) near the conversion code. Adding -fno-inline showed that truncAndCap() was short. –  Alexey Frunze Sep 27 '12 at 8:43

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