Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Do you know what the problem is by looking at the code?

I would be happy if you helped me:

list($from_day,$from_month,$from_year)    = explode(".","27.09.2012");
list($until_day,$until_month,$until_year) = explode(".","31.10.2012");

$iDateFrom = mktime(0,0,0,$from_month,$from_day,$from_year);
$iDateTo   = mktime(0,0,0,$until_month,$until_day,$until_year);

while ($iDateFrom <= $iDateTo) {
    print date('d.m.Y',$iDateFrom)."<br><br>";
    $iDateFrom += 86400; 
}

Date of writing the same problem 2 times

October (31) for writing 2 times in history draws the ends October 30th: (

27.09.2012

28.09.2012

...

26.10.2012

27.10.2012

[[28.10.2012]]

[[28.10.2012]]

29.10.2012

30.10.2012

share|improve this question
    
I copied and pasted your code, and don't have any problems.... –  cegfault Sep 26 '12 at 20:23

4 Answers 4

  1. Your problem is because you have set time to 00:00:00, set it to 12:00:00. That is because the Daylight saving time.
  2. Stop using date() function, use Date and Time classes.

Solution (PHP >= 5.4):

$p = new DatePeriod(
    new DateTime('2012-09-27'),
    new DateInterval('P1D'),
    (new DateTime('2012-10-31'))->modify('+1 day')
);
foreach ($p as $d) {
    echo $d->format('d.m.Y') . "\n";
}

Solution (PHP < 5.4)

$end = new DateTime('2012-10-31');
$end->modify('+1 day');
$p = new DatePeriod(
    new DateTime('2012-09-27'),
    new DateInterval('P1D'),
    $end
);
foreach ($p as $d) {
    echo $d->format('d.m.Y') . "\n";
}
share|improve this answer
    
Are you sure it is a problem with his code? I just ran the same code on my environment running PHP Version 5.3.13 and it worked fine. –  Flosculus Sep 26 '12 at 20:30
    
have a problem of October, attracting 31 - to 30 wrote: ( –  darkofpain Sep 26 '12 at 20:30
    
"That is because the Daylight saving time." - Granted –  Flosculus Sep 26 '12 at 20:31
    
@BatuhanBerkayGöksu: I fixed the code, so now it should work. But, this is php >= 5.4.x. If you do not have it, inicialize last DatePeriod paremeter outside, like $end = new DateTime('2012-10-31'); $end->modify('+1 day'); –  Glavić Sep 26 '12 at 20:34
    
@glavić [26-Sep-2012 20:39:32 UTC] PHP Parse error: syntax error, unexpected T_OBJECT_OPERATOR in C:\Program Files (x86)\Zend\Apache2\htdocs\calendar\index.php on line 134 line 134 (new DateTime('2012-10-31'))->modify('+1 day') –  darkofpain Sep 26 '12 at 20:41

You have daylight savings time issues. Adding seconds from one timestamp to another is prone to problems around these sorts of edge conditions (leap days can be problematic is well), You should get in the habit of using PHP's DateTime and DateInterval objects. It makes working with dates a snap.

$start_date = new DateTime('2012-09-27');
$end_date = new DateTime('2012-10-31');
$current_date = clone $start_date;
$date_interval = new DateInterval('P1D');

while ($current_date < $end_date) {
    // your logic here

    $current_date->add($date_interval);
}
share|improve this answer
    
[26-Sep-2012 20:42:48 UTC] PHP Catchable fatal error: Object of class DateTime could not be converted to string in C:\Program Files (x86)\Zend\Apache2\htdocs\calendar\index.php on line 139 line 139 $current_date->add($date_interval); $start_date = new DateTime('2012-08-27'); $end_date = new DateTime('2012-09-31'); $current_date = clone $start_date; $date_interval = new DateInterval('P1D'); while ($current_date < $end_date) { print $current_date; $current_date->add($date_interval); } –  darkofpain Sep 26 '12 at 20:43
    
Your error is in print $current_date. You need to use something like print $current_date->format('d.m.Y'); –  Mike Brant Sep 26 '12 at 20:48

My idea for solving this would be something like this;

$firstDate = "27.09.2012";
$secondDate = "31.10.2012";

$daysDifference = (strtotime($secondDate) - strtotime($firstDate)) / (60 * 60 * 24);
$daysDifference = round($daysDifference);

for ($i = 0; $i <= $daysDifference; $i++)
{
    echo date("d.m.Y", strtotime('+'.$i.' day', strtotime($firstDate))) . "<BR>";
}

This should solve your problem and be much easier to read (imho). I've just tested the code, and it outputs all dates and no doubles. It also saves you from all the daylight savings inconsistencies.

share|improve this answer

I don't know where you're from, but it's likely you're hitting daylight saving changeover in your timezone (it's Nov 4th where I live - exactly one week after Oct 28th). You can not rely on a day being exactly 86400 seconds long.

If you loop incrementing with mktime, you should be fine:

list($from_day,$from_month,$from_year)    = explode(".","27.09.2012");
list($until_day,$until_month,$until_year) = explode(".","31.10.2012");

$iDateFrom = mktime(0,0,0,$from_month,$from_day,$from_year);
$iDateTo   = mktime(0,0,0,$until_month,$until_day,$until_year);

while ($iDateFrom <= $iDateTo)
{
    print date('d.m.Y',$iDateFrom)."<br><br>";
    $from_day = $from_day + 1;
    $iDateFrom = mktime(0,0,0,$from_month,$from_day,$from_year);
}

Even though $from_day will likely be going well over 31, mktime will make the math conversion for you. (ie 32 days in a 31 day month = day 1 of the next month)

EDIT: sorry, I had the incrementation in the wrong place.

share|improve this answer
    
writes the first two times since 09.27.2012: ( –  darkofpain Sep 26 '12 at 20:54
    
My fault, I put the incrementation in the wrong place. Fixed. –  chops Sep 26 '12 at 21:18
    
thanks thanks thanks –  darkofpain Sep 26 '12 at 21:33

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.