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Usually when I write a PHP class I have done something like this:

class MyClass () {
   public attribute1;
   public attribute2;
   public attribute3;
}

Is it possible to set attributes based on logic?

class MyClass () {

   public function __construct() {
      if (some condition) {
         public attribute1;
         attribute1 = 23;
      } else {
         public attribute1;
         attribute1 = 55;
         public attribute2;
         attribute2 = 11;        
      }
   }
}
share|improve this question
    
This is possible, however perhaps it would be better if you described how you intend to use this class. Some scenarios would suit prototyping, others would be better with multiple classes, and some even by utilizing inheritance. – Flosculus Sep 26 '12 at 20:58
    
If you truly have different types of MyClass that need different properties, you might best use inheritance you have a base MyClass and than extend with subclasses for different property needs. – Mike Brant Sep 26 '12 at 21:02
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Like others said, use $this->param = 11;, but I don't like this idea, because I don't like undeclared variables in my classes.

Declaring variables in a class definition is for readability, and you can set private, public and protected. In java this is not permitted, and so should be in php, it should be error.

If your don not know what variables you will use, use magic methods _get() and _set().

Example code:

class MyClass {

    private $store = [];

    public function __get($name)
    {
        return isset($this->store[$name]) ? $this->store[$name] : null; # or output error
    }

    public function __set($name, $value)
    {
        $this->store[$name] = $value;
    }

    public function __construct()
    {
        if (rand(0,1)) {
            $this->attribute1 = 12;
        } else {
            $this->attribute2 = 21;
        }
    }

}

var_dump( (new MyClass)->attribute1 );
var_dump( (new MyClass)->attribute1 );
var_dump( (new MyClass)->attribute1 );

Output:

int(12)
NULL
int(12)
share|improve this answer
    
Can you give a little more detail? – Donny P Sep 26 '12 at 20:41
    
Here you go ;-) – Glavić Sep 26 '12 at 20:51
    
+1 now you've added the example – Mark Baker Sep 26 '12 at 21:01
    
Wow, didn't had realised that you couldn't set the visibilities that way. – Rafael Barros Mar 3 '14 at 19:25

Yes, but you do it like this:

class MyClass () { 

   public function __construct() { 
      if (some condition) { 
         $this->attribute1 = 23; 
      } else { 
         $this->attribute1 = 55; 
         $this->attribute2 = 11;         
      } 
   } 
} 

and the attributes will always be public.

share|improve this answer

An attribute is created when it's first accessed. As others said, it's not seen as a good practice, it's called monkey patching, and is only possible in dynamic languages (ie those where a compiler is not involved, at least on the developer side).

It's not good practice because if you don't keep your fields in a centralized place, automatic generation tools won't work, code assistants may not work, and other contributors to the codebase may have troubles understanding your code.

However it's not always a bad practice. For example, CakePHP (an MVC framework) uses the following technique to speed up the writing of certain classes. When you extend the Controller class like this

class ThingsController extends AppController {

  var $components = array("Foo", "Bar", "Baz");

  function index() {
    $this->Foo($this->Bar->bar());
  }

}

the $components variable is examined by the base class constructor to dinamically load the Foo, Bar and Baz classes, and make them automagically available in instance variables like $this->Foo inside ThingsController. However this is clearly stated in the documentation, and is a convention thoroughly used in modern frameworks to provide magic variables, ie variables not directly declared in code. This usage saves typing, but comes at the price of breaking support from the aforementioned tools - not to say that new developers often have some headaches :P

share|improve this answer
1  
+1 for giving reasons why it's not good practise, as well as identifying an example of the rare exceptions – Mark Baker Sep 26 '12 at 20:59

Properties which do not exist are created when first called.

class MyClass () {

   public function __construct() {
      if (some condition) {
         $this->attribute1 = 23;
      } else {
         $this->attribute1 = 55;
         $this->attribute2 = 11;        
      }
   }
}

But doing so is not a good practice. This way you will have to search for the properties declaration anywhere in your project. Think about your teammates(if any) or your future self. You should define all the properties the class has explicitly or you will definitely forget where you define them.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks kgb, does this mean objects do not generally vary their properties? – Donny P Sep 26 '12 at 20:42
    
Vary? I'm sorry, what do you mean? – Sergey Eremin Sep 26 '12 at 20:43
    
In the example above, sometimes the class will have 1 attribute, and sometimes it will have 2. If I explicitly define the attributes, how could the class sometimes have just attribute1, and sometimes both attributes? – Donny P Sep 26 '12 at 20:46
1  
@Donny P - with the exception of certain specialist classes (such as ORM) it's generally better to explicitly define the attributes appropriate to your class... and just because an attribute is defined, it can still have a NULL value if you don't use it in certain instances of your class – Mark Baker Sep 26 '12 at 20:46

Yes, you wouldn't use public attribute1;' inside a method though. You would use $this->attribute1 = 23; or $this->attribute2 = 11;

share|improve this answer

Of course.

class MyClass () {
   public $attribute1;

   public function __construct($an_array = NULL) {
      if ($an_array) {
         $this->attribute1 = $an_array;  
      }
   }
}
share|improve this answer

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