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I was messing with some code and was faced with a particular problem:

def find_available_slug(object, instance, slug)
    try:
        sender_node = object.objects.get(slug=slug)
    except object.DoesNotExist:
        instance.slug = slug
    else:
        slug = '%s_' % slug
        find_available_slug(object, instance, slug)
    return

The issue I am having is that sometimes objects.get(slug=slug) throws a MultipleObjectsReturned exception because that field is not unique within my database. I wonder how I can cleanly catch MultipleObjectsReturned while the "else" statement will still get executed.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Alternatively, don't use the else clause at all:

def find_available_slug(object, instance, slug)
    try:
        sender_node = object.objects.get(slug=slug)
    except object.DoesNotExist:
        instance.slug = slug
        return
    except object.MultipleObjectsReturned:
        pass

    slug = '%s_' % slug
    find_available_slug(object, instance, slug)
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Simple solution: the trick is to trap MultipleObjectsReturned inside a second try statement, when calling the get method. This way, no exception is raised and execution continues normally.

Works:

def find_available_slug(object, instance, slug)
    try:
        try:
            sender_node = object.objects.get(slug=slug)
        except object.MultipleObjectsReturned:
            pass
    except object.DoesNotExist:
        instance.slug = slug
    else:
        slug = '%s_' % slug
        find_available_slug(object, instance, slug)
    return

Does not work:

def find_available_slug(object, instance, slug)
    try:
        sender_node = object.objects.get(slug=slug)
    except object.MultipleObjectsReturned:
        pass
    except object.DoesNotExist:
        instance.slug = slug
    else:
        slug = '%s_' % slug
        find_available_slug(object, instance, slug)
    return

The reason the second "naive" method does not work is that if an exception is caught, the interpreter will not go through the else: clause. It would instead silently return.

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@sebleblanc.. Did you just answered your own question?? Or I became blind?? –  Rohit Jain Sep 26 '12 at 20:47
    
@RohitJain -- There's nothing wrong with answering your own question. It happens somewhat frequently. –  mgilson Sep 26 '12 at 20:48
1  
@mgilson..Well, just asked.. Because duration beween his asking question and answering it was mere few seconds only.. Else, there is of course nothing wrong.. –  Rohit Jain Sep 26 '12 at 20:50
    
@RohitJain -- good point. I didn't look at the timestamps. –  mgilson Sep 26 '12 at 20:57
1  
@RohitJain, from the "Ask Question" page, you can check a box and add your own answer to the question. –  sebleblanc Sep 27 '12 at 2:33
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