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I have classes A and B. Now I need to write a new class C that will use some fields and methods in both A and B but not all of them. (I'll use about 50% of the stuff from A and B).

Right now I'm thinking about inheriting from both A and B. But that will make C contain a lot of fields and methods that have no meaning.

Basically I'm using inheritance only for code reuse purposes, because otherwise I will have to copy and paste many lines of code from A and B.

Is this practice really bad? Is there a different approach?

Thanks!

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Thanks for the replies guys! I really appreciate them. The reason I considered using inheritance instead of composition is because I also need to modify some behaviors in A and B. Also I don't really want to edit A and B. –  user1657624 Sep 26 '12 at 21:37
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5 Answers

Inheritance doesn't have a concept of "is half of a", so it's definitely not the way to go here. It sounds like it's a prime case for composition.

It sounds like A and B have more than one "function" since half of them each are enough to compose a C.

I'm not sure this is applicable in your case, but consider breaking A into two parts, A1 and A2 with the required functionality for C in A1. Then do the same for B into B1 and B2.

A will then be a composition of A1 and A2, B will be a composition of B1 and B2 and C will be a composition of A1 and B1. None of them with any un-necessary functionality or data.

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Inheritance should use the "is a" paradigm.
Meaning that C should inherit from A,B if it's a sort of A and B.
If you're already using multiple inheritance, you may want to break A and B to multiple classes each dealing with a small fragment of your code, and then inherit C only from what you need - this way C will only take up the space it needs (assuming A and B have many members).
Remember that the size of your class is not affected by member methods, only member data.

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In C++, public inheritance means "is-a". Other levels of inheritance mean something different...like "is-implemented-in-terms-of". –  cHao Sep 26 '12 at 21:28
    
@cHao - that's true, but even with private inheritance - C having access to parts of code it doesn't need is a bad practice. Besides - if A and B have many data members the size of C will still be bigger than it should be. –  iMoses Sep 26 '12 at 21:40
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It is bad. Only use inheritance when it logically makes sense to.

Use composition instead (private inheritance is a form of composition, but better go old-school):

class C
{
    A a;
    B b;
}

If C isn't composed of A and B, you can also keep pointers instead, so the size of C doesn't increase.

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As Herb Sutter and Andrei Alexandrescu explain in their book C++ Coding Standards (item 34), inheritance is one of the tightest relationships which C++ allows you to use between two classes - It is second only to a friend relationship between classes.

According to the S.O.L.I.D principles of OO, a successful design should aim for loose coupling between classes - this infers keeping dependencies to a minimum; which in turn implies that inheritance is a tool which should be used with care.

Of course, dependencies generally need to exist somewhere, so a reasonable compromise can be inheriting from classes with no implementation at all (Analogous to so-called interfaces in languages such as C# and Java). e.g.

class IDriveable
{
public:
    virtual void GoForward() = 0;
    virtual void GoBackward() = 0;
};

class Car : public IDriveable { /* etc. */ };
class Bus : public IDriveable { /* etc. */ };
class Train : public IDriveable { /* etc. */ };

With this approach, if you have elements of code which are reused between several Drivable classes, you would typically use composition or some other weaker relationship to eliminate repeated code.
e.g. perhaps you want to reuse code to TurnLeft for a Bus and a Car but not a Train where turning left is illogical, so TurnLeft could end up in a separate class which is a member-of Bus and Car.

  • In addition, any functionality which might need to know about all of the vaguely-related classes would be external to the class heirarchy, only aware of the interface/base rather than the nitty-gritty implementation details.

The end result may be a small amount of extra code for composition, but often a less complex design, and typically one which is easier to manage. There aren't any hard-fast rules for designing code like this since it depends entirely on the unique problems which you're trying to solve.

There are other ways to reuse code without tight coupling too - templates let you implicitly define interfaces without empty classes containing pure virtual functions (templates provide additional type safety - which is a very good thing, but they are syntactically a little more complex);

And there are ways which you can use std::function and lambdas in order to reuse code in a more functional style - again there's usually no tight dependencies involved when passing around function objects.

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It sounds like you could benefit from refactoring your code:

Instead of this:

class A
{
  virtual void foo();
  virtual void bar();
};

class B
{
  virtual void biz();
  virtual void baz();
};

class C : public A, public B
{
  virtual void foo() { /* my stuff */ }
  virtual void biz() { /* my other stuff */ +

  // but I don't need bar or baz!
};

Consider splitting out the conceptually different parts of A and B that you want in C:

class core_A
{
  virtual void foo();
};

class A : public core_A
{
  virtual void bar();
};

class core_B
{
  virtual void biz();
};

class B : public core_B
{
  virtual void baz();
};

class C : public core_A, public core_B
{
  virtual void foo() { /* my stuff */ }
  virtual void biz() { /* my other stuff */ +

  // Great, I don't have bar or baz!
};
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