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How do I convert a string to base36 (0-9,a-z) in perl?

I want to convert IP addresses to base36 with a one to one map, so I can use them in a URL.

127.0.0.1 === string ==> 127000000001 === base36 ==>

72.98.234.11 === string ==> 072098234011 === base36 ==>

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what have you tried? –  TJD Sep 26 '12 at 21:36
    
I found Math::Base36 but to encode it wants an int as an argument so I was trying to find a way to convert a string to a unique int. –  Emil Davtyan Sep 26 '12 at 21:38
    
you can use int($str) or multiply string by 1 to get an int –  scrappedcola Sep 26 '12 at 21:39
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2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Isn't base 10 good enough? That gives a number in [0-4294967295] (1 to 10 digits). That's only slightly longer than what you we were going to get from your way (1 to 8 digits).

$ perl -E'say unpack "N", pack "C4", split /\./, $ARGV[0]' 127.0.0.1
2130706433

$ perl -E'say unpack "N", pack "C4", split /\./, $ARGV[0]' 72.98.234.11
1214441995

Completely reversible:

$ perl -E'say join ".", unpack "C4", pack "N", $ARGV[0]' 2130706433
127.0.0.1

$ perl -E'say join ".", unpack "C4", pack "N", $ARGV[0]' 1214441995
72.98.234.11

You could convert that number to another base other than 10 using any number of modules on CPAN.

base 10: 1-10 digits
base 16: 1-8 digits    # Can be done very efficiently
base 36: 1-7 digits
base 62: 1-6 digits
base 64: 1-6 digits    # Can be done very efficiently

Base 16:

sub pack_ip { sprintf "%X", unpack "N", pack "C4", split /\./, $_[0] }

sub unpack_ip { join ".", unpack "C4", pack "N", hex $_[0] }

Base 64: (This should be quite speedy. Faster even if ported to C.)

my @syms = ('0'..'9', 'A'..'Z', 'a'..'z', '_', '-');
my %syms = map { $sym[$_] => $_ } 0..$#syms;

sub pack_ip {
   my $num = unpack "N", pack "C4", split /\./, $_[0];
   my $base64 = join '', @syms[
      ($num >> 30) & 0x3F,
      ($num >> 24) & 0x3F,
      ($num >> 18) & 0x3F,
      ($num >> 12) & 0x3F,
      ($num >>  6) & 0x3F,
      ($num >>  0) & 0x3F,
   ];
   $base64 =~ s/^A+(?!\z)//;
   return $base64;
}

sub unpack_ip {
   my $num;
   $num = ($num << 6) | $sym{$_}
      for split //, $_[0];
   return join ".", unpack "C4", pack "N", $num;
}
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This looks like what I needed and actually better because the intermediate int is smaller this way, but I will plug that int to Math::Base36 and it should produce a string around 6 characters long. 2130706433 => Z8KFLT –  Emil Davtyan Sep 26 '12 at 21:47
    
I'm trying to figure out if this gives a one to one map. The split is disregarding the periods, and it could lead to collisions. –  Emil Davtyan Sep 26 '12 at 22:08
    
Added more. Yes, one to one map. –  ikegami Sep 26 '12 at 22:11
    
Yes, I just realized that too. I had to read the pack and unpack documentation. Thank you. –  Emil Davtyan Sep 26 '12 at 22:15
    
I'm probably not understanding something right but why is it C4 instead of C3? It is packing max 3 character long strings (127,0,1). –  Emil Davtyan Sep 26 '12 at 22:22
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Why don't you use base 16 since that's basically what an IP address is anyway?

sub ip_to_hex {
  join('', map { sprintf('%02x', $_) } split(/\./, shift));
}

sub hex_to_ip {
  join('.', map { hex($_) } shift =~ m/([0-9a-f]{2})/g);
}

say ip_to_hex('127.0.0.1');    # 7f000001
say ip_to_hex('72.98.234.11'); # 4862ea0b
say hex_to_ip('4862ea0b');     # 72.98.234.11
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