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Thanks for all the help, I have moved my initializations down to the Constructor, however, I'm having difficulties defining the 2D vector:

Here is what I have done:

private:
        vector < vector <int> > Matrix;
        vector < vector <int> > temp_m;
        vector <int> elements
        string input;
        int value;
function()
{
//Initialize Both Matrices (one which holds the puzzle and the
//other which holds the values between 1 and 9
//Create a vector of vectors:
for(int i = 0; i < 9; i++)
    elements.push_back(i+1);
for(int i = 0; i < 9; i++)
    Matrix[i].push_back(elements);  //ERROR HERE
}

I'm getting an error in the line where I define the 2D matrix. I want to push back matrix into its indices since its a matrix of a matrix.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The declaration of "row" and its construction are not in the same place. Construction belongs on an initializer list:

class MyClass
{
public:
    MyClass::MyClass()
      : row(9,0), elements(9)
    {
    }

private:
        vector < vector <int> > Matrix;
        vector < vector <int> > temp_m;
        vector <int> row;
        vector <int> elements;
        string input;
        int value;
}

If you have any other special sizing or initialization of member variables the require construction parameters (such as your Matrix and temp_e above) they belong in the initializer list as well.

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So can I do something like this in my constructor: for(int i = 0; i < 9; i++) elements.push_back(i+1); for(int i = 0; i < 9; i++) Matrix[i].push_back(elements); –  Josh Sep 26 '12 at 21:49
    
Also, what does MyClasss::Myclass() : row(9, 0), elements(9) mean? –  Josh Sep 26 '12 at 22:16
1  
Your first question actually makes the need to construct-initialize the member variables unnecessary. The second question however, bears merit. The syntax means "construct these member variables using their constructors that match the provided parameters). In this case it means "call the vector<int>::vector(n,ch) constructor on the "row" member, then call the vector<int>::vector(n) constructor on the "elements member. I suggest further reading on C++, specifically constructors and initializer lists, as well as a more in-depth look at STL containers for more info. –  WhozCraig Sep 26 '12 at 22:54
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That is not legal (defintely pre C++11 anyway, there were changes in C++11 but I am unsure of the exact rules). You can specify it in the constructor initializer list instead:

A::A() : row(9, 0), elements(9) {}

and change to:

private:
    vector<int> row;
    vector<int> elements;
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I'm not sure what ": row(9, 0), elements(9) mean –  Josh Sep 26 '12 at 22:19
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Try removing the (9 , 0) from the declaration. In C++, you cannot call a constructor from a class variable declaration. You will need to do this from your class constructor using an initializer list.

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@WhozCraig Thanks for the clarification. I have edited my answer. –  Code-Apprentice Sep 26 '12 at 21:47
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