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I'm calling a slow webservice in parallel. Things were great until I realized I need to get some information back from the service. But I don't see where to get the values back. I can't write to the database, HttpContext.Current appears to be null inside of a method called using Parallel.ForEach

Below is a sample program (in your mind, please imagine a slow web service instead of a string concatenation)

using System;
using System.Threading.Tasks;

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        WordMaker m = new WordMaker();
        m.MakeIt();
    }
    public class WordMaker
    {
        public void MakeIt()
        {
            string[] words = { "ack", "ook" };
            ParallelLoopResult result = Parallel.ForEach(words, word => AddB(word));
            Console.WriteLine("Where did my results go?");
            Console.ReadKey();
        }
        public string AddB(string word)
        {
            return "b" + word;
        }
    }

}
share|improve this question
    
A different overload of Parallel.ForEach may be what you want: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dd991486.aspx –  Austin Salonen Sep 26 '12 at 21:45
    
Unfortunately that's not really something you can do like that. Parallel.Foreach() just wasn't built for keeping track of returns. I would, however, suggest using ref parameters in your AddB function. That might do it. –  Phillip Schmidt Sep 26 '12 at 21:46
    
@PhillipSchmidt: Not with the overload used in the example anyway... –  Austin Salonen Sep 26 '12 at 21:47
    
@AustinSalonen What's another overload that would work? I'm not arguing, I just wasn't aware of anything that would do what he wants. –  Phillip Schmidt Sep 26 '12 at 21:49
    
@PhillipSchmidt The link in my first comment explicitly handles a Func<...> instead of Action<...> –  Austin Salonen Sep 26 '12 at 21:51

3 Answers 3

up vote 21 down vote accepted

You've discarded it in here.

ParallelLoopResult result = Parallel.ForEach(words, word => AddB(word));

You probably want something like,

ParallelLoopResult result = Parallel.ForEach(words, word =>
{
    string result = AddB(word);
    // do something with result
});

If you want some sort of collection at the end of this, consider using one of the collections under System.Collections.Concurrent, like ConcurrentBag

var resultCollection = new ConcurrentBag<string>();
ParallelLoopResult result = Parallel.ForEach(words, word =>
{
    resultCollectin.Add(AddB(word));
});

// Do something with result
share|improve this answer
10  
I think the ParallelLoopResult does nothing useful here. +1 though –  usr Sep 27 '12 at 7:41

Do not use ConcurrentBag to collect results as it is extremely slow. Use local lock instead.

var resultCollection = new List<string>();
object localLockObject = new object();

Parallel.ForEach<string, List<string>>(
      words,
      () => { return new List<string>(); },
      (word, state, localList) =>
      {
         localList.Add(AddB(word));
         return localList;
      },
      (finalResult) => { lock (localLockObject) resultCollection.AddRange(finalResult); }
); 

// Do something with resultCollection here
share|improve this answer

How about something like this:

public class WordContainer
{
    public WordContainer(string word)
    {
        Word = word;
    }

    public string Word { get; private set; }
    public string Result { get; set; }
}

public class WordMaker
{
    public void MakeIt()
    {
        string[] words = { "ack", "ook" };
        List<WordContainer> containers = words.Select(w => new WordContainer(w)).ToList();

        Parallel.ForEach(containers, AddB);

        //containers.ForEach(c => Console.WriteLine(c.Result));
        foreach (var container in containers)
        {
            Console.WriteLine(container.Result);
        }

        Console.ReadKey();
    }

    public void AddB(WordContainer container)
    {
        container.Result = "b" + container.Word;
    }
}

I believe the locking or concurrent objects isn't necessary unless you need the results to interact with one another (like you were computing a sum or combining all the words). In this case ForEach neatly breaks your original list up and hands each thread its own object that it can manipulate all it wants without worrying about interfering with the other threads.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, that would work for Console apps, but event for Console apps you might want to aggregate them first in a collection, or else you get interleaved results to the Console window. –  MatthewMartin Apr 3 at 2:00
    
The Console.WriteLine commands are running synchronously on the main thread and it will print the results in the order they were defined in the original List after Parallel.ForEach finishes processing all the list items and returns. If I were calling WriteLine from within the Parallel.ForEach then yes the results would be interleaved. –  MichaC Apr 4 at 0:53

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