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Inside a service class, I have a method that is called from a @Transactional method. I have verified that I have a transaction active at the point this code is called. I realize that I don't have a DA layer when I should, but I am working with a legacy application that makes doing things the 'right' way more of a hassle than it's worth at this point.

The mappings look like this:

public class Foo {

  private String id;
  private Bar bar;

  @Id
  @Column(name = "FOO_ID", unique = true, nullable = false, length = 16)
  @GeneratedValue(generator = "blahIdSeq")
  @GenericGenerator(name = "blahIdSeq",
                    strategy = "org.blah.CustomIdGenerator")
  public String getId() {return id;}

  @JoinColumn(name = "FOO_ID")
  @OneToOne(fetch = FetchType.LAZY, optional = false)
  public Bar getBar() { return bar; }

  // SETTERS INCLUDED

}

public class Bar {
  private String id;
  private Foo foo;

  @Id
  @Column(name = "FOO_ID")
  @GeneratedValue(generator = "someSeq")
  @GenericGenerator(name = "someSeq",
                    strategy = "foreign",
                    parameters = {
                      @Parameter(name = "property", value = "foo")
                    })
  public String getId() { return id; }

  @OneToOne(fetch = FetchType.LAZY)
  @PrimaryKeyJoinColumn(name = "FOO_ID")
  public Foo getFoo() { return foo; }

  // SETTERS INCLUDED

}

The method looks something like this:

public String createFoo(Foo foo) {
  Session ses = getSessionFactory().getCurrentSession();
  Bar bar = new Bar();
  bar.setFoo(foo);
  foo.setBar(bar);
  ses.save(foo);
  ses.save(bar);

  System.out.println(foo.getId()); // yields the ID value set by generator
  System.out.println(bar.getId()); // yields same ID value as above

  ses.flush();
  ses.refresh(foo);
}

Now, with org.hibernate.SQL logging set to DEBUG, I can see that the insert statements for both Foo and Bar are created, but the refresh after the flush is called throws a org.hibernate.UnresolvableObjectException: No row with the given identifier exists exception.

What could cause this? The database used is Oracle 11gR2.

UPDATE

I have narrowed my issue down to sessions. It seems that calling the currentSession.flush() is not writing the data to the database as expected for the refresh. If I comment out the rest of the method, it will commit at the end and everything will be in the database.

Doing the flush/refresh will not return the hydrated object, however, so I cannot use the database-populated values (set by column defaults) later on in my transaction. I also cannot split the transaction into multiple ones because I need to be able to rollback at any point in the method.

Any ideas as to why the flush is not giving me accessible data in the database?

ANOTHER UPDATE

I have moved a lot of code around just to try and isolate the issue, and I'm still having problems. I also got rid of the relationship between the two entities to try and handle everything manually, just to see if that would fix the problem. Considering all the comments from Steve, here's what I have now:

public class Foo {

  private String id;
  private Bar bar;

  @Id
  @Column(name = "FOO_ID", unique = true, nullable = false, length = 16)
  @GeneratedValue(generator = "blahIdSeq")
  @GenericGenerator(name = "blahIdSeq",
                    strategy = "org.blah.CustomIdGenerator")
  public String getId() {return id;}

  // SETTERS INCLUDED

}

public class Bar {
  private String id;
  private Foo foo;

  @Id
  @Column(name = "FOO_ID")
  public String getId() { return id; }

  // SETTERS INCLUDED

}

@Service('fooService')
@Transactional(readOnly = true)
class FooService {
  @Autowired
  SessionFactory sessionFactory // populated using Spring config:
                                // org.springframework.orm.hibernate3.annotation.AnnotationSessionFactoryBean

  @Transactional(readOnly = false)
  public void doSomeStuff(Foo fooToSave) {
    sessionFactory.getCurrentSession().saveOrUpdate(fooToSave);
    Bar bar = new Bar(fooToSave); // this populates the Bar.Id field
    sessionFactory.getCurrentSession().saveOrUpdate(bar);
    sessionFactory.getCurrentSession().flush();
    sessionFactory.getCurrentSession().refresh(fooToSave); // exception thrown here
  }
}

YET ANOTHER UPDATE

After quite a bit of playing around in Oracle-land to make sure that the SQL was running on the same session and the like, I've found the issue. Even though Hibernate is logging that the SQL bind variables are being set, they actually are not. Using Oracle 11gR2's V$SQL_BIND_CAPTURE, I was able to see using the SQL ID that was executed last (verified to be the insert statement) had 24 bind variables and not one of them ever had a value bound to it. Still not sure what's causing the values to be blank, but I am quite a bit closer to finding my answer. It has to be a problem with my mappings, which I cannot put here in entirety.

Being bind variables, I'm guessing that Oracle doesn't throw a fit about not being able to insert. JDBC typically just returns the number of rows inserted for an INSERT statement for verification, but I'm not sure exactly how the Hibernate abstraction handles this stuff. I am currently using Hibernate 3.6.10 -- upgraded from 3.6.5 to see if it might fix the issue. It didn't. :P

I'VE BEEN MISLEAD

Ignore that "YET ANOTHER UPDATE" section, above. The bind variables seem like they don't show up in the V$SQL_BIND_CAPTURE view until the transaction has been committed. Back to the drawing board.

ANOTHER REVISION - I SWEAR I'M GONNA GET BANNED

I decided to go back to basics. What have I changed since it was in a working state? Mostly mappings. A few service layer items were also changed, but it was mostly moving our Hibernate mappings from XML to annotations. So I took the same service method I've been playing with, commented out all the other stuff, and tried doing the very same thing as what I'm trying to do with Foo using another persistent object type. Guess what? That works. The only link that could be causing my heartache at this point is the mapping I have for Foo. I doubt my employer would like me to just throw full source up on SO, so I'll probably have to just figure this one out on my own. I will post the answer in some capacity when I finally figure it out.

SUCCESS! BUT I'M NOT SURE WHY...

Here's the code that was giving me trouble. Keep in mind that BAZ is a linking table that has a composite ID made up with an @Embeddable (just called "key" for this example), consisting of FOO_ID referencing a row in the FOO table and a STATE_ID referencing another table.

public class Foo {

  // OTHER FIELDS INCLUDING IDs AND SUCH

  private Baz bazOfDoom;
  private Baz bazOfLight;
  private Set<Baz> allTheBaz;

  @OneToOne(fetch = FetchType.LAZY, cascade = CascadeType.REFRESH)
  @JoinColumns({
    @JoinColumn(name = "FOO_ID", referencedColumnName = "FOO_ID", insertable = false, updatable = false, nullable = false)
    @JoinColumn(name = "DOOM_ID", referencedColumnName = "STATE_ID", insertable = false, updatable = false, nullable = false)
  })
  public Baz getBazOfDoom() { return bazOfDoom; }

  @OneToOne(fetch = FetchType.LAZY, cascade = CascadeType.REFRESH)
  @JoinColumns({
    @JoinColumn(name = "FOO_ID", referencedColumnName = "FOO_ID", insertable = false, updatable = false, nullable = false)
    @JoinColumn(name = "LIGHT_ID", referencedColumnName = "STATE_ID", insertable = false, updatable = false, nullable = false)
  })
  public Baz getBazOfLight() { return bazOfLight; }

  @OneToMany(mappedBy = "key.foo", fetch = FetchType.LAZY, cascade = CascadeType.REFRESH)
  public Set<Baz> getAllTheBaz() { return allTheBaz; }
}

I removed the cascades and it worked. I don't know why. Whoever can explain that will get the "correct answer" mark from me. :)

share|improve this question
    
WRT your update... not sure what currentSession is supposed to reference. In your code samples, you use ses. Is that the same? flush() writes pending changes to the database. So if ses.flush() is not writing changes then ses does not think there are changes to write. Or you have multiple transactions and isolation is isolating them from each other. We'd have to see more code to judge that. Better for you to simplify this down to even just a single method call (test style) and work up/out from there. –  Steve Ebersole Oct 2 '12 at 15:05
    
On a side note, rather than doing the manual refresh() all the time I suggest you look at Hibernate's notion of "generated property values". Essentially you tell Hibernate that the value for certain attributes will be generated by the db and it will automatically refresh that state for you right after it does inserts/updates. See docs.jboss.org/hibernate/orm/4.1/manual/en-US/html_single/… –  Steve Ebersole Oct 2 '12 at 15:06
    
Wow, thanks for all that. I will definitely check into the second note you left there. I have tried playing around with the stuff you mentioned in the first note, and it still seems to have the problem. Yes, ses is the same as currentSession -- sorry for the inconsistency. –  Andy Oct 2 '12 at 16:44
2  
sorry did not realize you worked in China :) –  Steve Ebersole Oct 2 '12 at 18:31
1  
What I would suggest at this point is to remove Spring from the equation. It really seems to be an issue with transaction handling. Are you certain Spring is managing the connection properly for the duration of the transaction? In "JTA" environments Hibernate will typically use what it calls connection releasing (meaning it gets a Connection, uses it and returns it to the DataSource) relying on the fact that JTA guarantees that the same Connection will be returned within that same transaction. –  Steve Ebersole Oct 2 '12 at 20:05
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2 Answers

It seems that your object doesn't own an identifer for your object after saving it to database, leading thus to your exception when calling refresh().

Indeed, assume your database tables own primary key defined as auto-increment.So, when you save your first Foo object, primary key column is valued as: 1.

However, Hibernate has to be aware of this newly generated identifier after calling save() method !

The best way to do this is to expect Hibernate to reaffect the good identifier as soon as the object is saved into database.

Thus, you might miss this line within your entity classes in order to provide identifier automatically when object is saved in database:

@GeneratedValue(strategy = GenerationType.AUTO)

Of course, you don't have to autogenerate them and rather can manually precise it.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the answer. I have the GeneratedValue set on the @OneToOne association in the mapping. I will update my question with the appropriate code as to give you a better idea of what I'm dealing with. –  Andy Sep 27 '12 at 11:17
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Try to annotate your method with @Transactional(propagation = Propagation.REQUIRES_NEW) and don't use session flush/refresh.

share|improve this answer
    
Interesting. So you're saying annotate the calling method with REQUIRES_NEW and the called method with just @Transactional? Won't that cause the called method to commit prematurely? –  Andy Oct 2 '12 at 12:26
    
That depends on your business logic. Are you calling this method from somewhere else or not etc. –  Aleksandr M Oct 2 '12 at 12:35
    
I think I had my reply backward. I tried it both ways however, and it did not fix the issue. Thanks for the answer! –  Andy Oct 2 '12 at 14:58
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