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I'm trying to let a program post a bunch of text. The user enters text, the amount of messages and how fast these must be delivered. While the program is busy, the button text needs to be "Stop" instead of "Start". When you press the button to force it to stop after you've initially launched it, the text changes back to "Start", but this doesn't happen when the program stops after the given amount of messages are delivered, even though the code is in place and doesn't generate an error.

I have a feeling that this is because of the text not updating for some reason. I've tried to flush it with Invalidate() and Update(), but this isn't working. How to fix this?

Here is the code:

private void button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        if (button1.Text == "Start")
        {
            isEvil = true;
            button1.Text = "Stop";

            Thread t = new Thread(StartTyping);
            t.Start(textBox1.Text);
        }
        else
        {
            isEvil = false;
            button1.Text = "Start";
        }
    }

    private void StartTyping(object obj)
    {
        string message = obj.ToString();
        int amount = (int)numericUpDown2.Value;
        Thread.Sleep(3000);


        for (int i = 0; i < amount; i++)
        {
            if (isEvil == false)
            {
                //////This does NOT work
                //button1.Text = "Start";
                //button1.Invalidate();
                //button1.Update();
                //button1.Refresh();
                //Application.DoEvents();
                break;
            }

            SendKeys.SendWait(message + "{ENTER}");
            int j = (int)numericUpDown1.Value * 10;
            Thread.Sleep(j);
        }
    }
share|improve this question
1  
You can't update the UI on a separate thread from the UI thread. Is this using WPF or Winforms? Also what version of .NET? –  Kevin DiTraglia Sep 26 '12 at 21:55
    
I'm not sure I like your intentions... isEvil?? I'm guessing this is a malicious program... –  sircapsalot Sep 26 '12 at 21:57
    
@surcapsalot No, I just found that a funny and fitting name. The program is just to play with and to learn from. KDiTraglia Windows Forms. 4.0 if I'm correct. –  Annoying Bot Sep 26 '12 at 21:59
1  
haha, I got an email once with a link onclick="RunMaliciousCode();" - sounds a little like that –  Scott Selby Sep 26 '12 at 22:01

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You have four answers telling you to update UI stuff from the UI thread, but none of them address the logic flow problem with your code.

The reason why it doesn't happen is because it only happens in the for-loop when isEvil is false. When does isEvil get set to false? Only when you click "Stop", and nowhere else.

If you want the button to go back to "Start" after the thread finishes, without clicking "Stop", then you need to add code after the loop to do that, independent of the value of isEvil: (piggybacking off of VoidMain's answer)

private void StartTyping(object obj)
{
    string message = obj.ToString();
    int amount = (int)numericUpDown2.Value;
    Thread.Sleep(3000);

    for (int i = 0; i < amount; i++)
    {
        if (isEvil == false)
        {
            if (button1.InvokeRequired)
            {
                button1.BeginInvoke( new Action(() => { button1.Text = "Start"; }) );
            }
            else
            {
                button1.Text = "Start";
            }
            break;
        }

        SendKeys.SendWait(message + "{ENTER}");
        int j = (int)numericUpDown1.Value * 10;
        Thread.Sleep(j);
    }

    if (button1.InvokeRequired)
    {
        button1.BeginInvoke( new Action(() => { button1.Text = "Start"; }) );
    }
    else
    {
        button1.Text = "Start";
    }
}

Now you have duplicated code, so you might want to split it off into a separate method.

share|improve this answer
    
Very clear, thank you very much! –  Annoying Bot Sep 26 '12 at 22:41

You need to be on the UI thread to update the UI.

Try something called the SynchronizationContext. There are plenty of examples when you google it.

If you're in WPF or Silverlight, you could use the Dispatcher. Again, lots of examples if you search those keywords in google or StackOverflow.

share|improve this answer

You must update your controls from the UI thread. This is how you would do it for winforms.

    for (int i = 0; i < amount; i++)
    {
        if (isEvil == false)
        {
            button1.Invoke(new Action(() => button1.Text = "Start"));
            break;
        }

        SendKeys.SendWait(message + "{ENTER}");
        int j = (int)numericUpDown1.Value * 10;
        Thread.Sleep(j);
    }

This will block till button1 get's its text updated. If you don't want it to block, replace Invoke with BeginInvoke

share|improve this answer
    
Still the same result, the button1.Text doesn't update. –  Annoying Bot Sep 26 '12 at 22:05
    
Are you running this check in a background worker or in the UI thread? –  Scott Chamberlain Sep 26 '12 at 22:06
    
I suppose in the UI thread, although I'm not exactly sure what you mean. I'm still a beginner at C#. –  Annoying Bot Sep 26 '12 at 22:12

Your best bet is to use a BackgroundWorker. It's a bit too wieldy to add a concise example here but there's a decent tutorial from O'Reilly

share|improve this answer

Something like this (not tested) should work:

private void StartTyping(object obj)
{
    string message = obj.ToString();
    int amount = (int)numericUpDown2.Value;
    Thread.Sleep(3000);


    for (int i = 0; i < amount; i++)
    {
        if (isEvil == false)
        {
            if(button1.InvokeRequired)
            {
                button1.BeginInvoke( new Action(() => { button1.Text = "Start"; }) );
            }
            else
            {
                button1.Text = "Start";
            }
            break;
        }

        SendKeys.SendWait(message + "{ENTER}");
        int j = (int)numericUpDown1.Value * 10;
        Thread.Sleep(j);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
InvokeRequired is not required, we already know we are on a different thread so there is no need to check, also for a one line lambada you don't need to include the { } –  Scott Chamberlain Sep 26 '12 at 22:04
    
Thanks, Scott, i'm aware of both, i put the test to InvokeRequired because, from the code he has posted i'm not entirelly sure it will be invoked every time fom the same place and, as for the braces i tend to put it anyway just for clarity... –  VoidMain Sep 26 '12 at 22:06
    
It generates an error: "Cannot convert lambda expression to type 'System.Delegate' because it is not a delegate type". –  Annoying Bot Sep 26 '12 at 22:29
    
Now it works, try the updated version. –  VoidMain Sep 26 '12 at 22:31

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