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So, our alarming platform generates proprietary code based off of SNMP MIBs. If you're not hip to SNMP, don't fret, this question is only tangentially related. The code ends up looking something like this:

case ".1.3.6.1.4.1.5555": ## This is the OID for that specific device type, this switch/case began in the main file.
    switch ($specific-trap): {
        case "10": ## The specific alarm
            # Alarm-specific code
            @Identifier = $enterprise + "." + $specific-trap
        case "11": ## A different alarm
            # Alarm-specific code
            @Identifier = $enterprise + "." + $specific-trap
        case "12": ## A different alarm
            # Alarm-specific code
            @Identifier = $enterprise + "." + $specific-trap
        case "20": ## clears specific-trap 10
            # Alarm-specific code
            @Identifier = $enterprise + "." + $specific-trap
        case "21": ## clears 11
            # Alarm-specific code
            @Identifier = $enterprise + "." + $specific-trap
        case "22": ## clears 12
            # Alarm-specific code
            @Identifier = $enterprise + "." + $specific-trap
        default:
            ## what happens if the alarm isn't found
    }

What I need to do is use the alarms and clears as the @Identifier (the unique key), so they overwrite each other. So, for example, the first case should look like this:

    case "10": ## The specific alarm
        # Alarm-specific code
        @Identifier = $enterprise + ".10-20"

and the "20" case would be set the same.

I usually just go through the file and hand-edit these, but that can get tedious if there are hundreds of traps. Am I missing some sort of easy VI trick that I could do this with? Everything I think of wouldn't work because the $specific-trap value isn't on the same line as the @Identifier already.

I've considered just writing a Perl script to take care of it, but I'm lazy. I thought there might be some VI magic that could do it easily.

share|improve this question
    
I don't understand from where you get 10-20. What numbers would be for the case "11"? –  Birei Sep 27 '12 at 8:18
    
11-21. See the comments. 20 clears 10, 21 clears 11, etc. –  coding_hero Sep 27 '12 at 14:32
    
Ah, ok. One more question. All case ...: are identical but in the comments following them, as you pointed out. Comments are not added by you to show this example clearer? A program should check the content of each comment to know if it's an alarm or a clear? And what clear is attached to each alarm? –  Birei Sep 27 '12 at 14:52
    
No, no, the comments are mine alone. The alarms and clears can be any distance apart, but they either are sequential ('10' is the alarm, and '11' is the clear), or seperated by adding some power of 10, as in the example above. I guess what I'm looking for is a general procedure that I can use since the specific-trap that I need for the string is a few lines above, and the clear usually follows a predictable pattern. –  coding_hero Sep 27 '12 at 15:38
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