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I am building a multiplication table in python using while loops. The output is strange though as the numbers line up. The table is fine in terms of completion but it looks ugly. How can i straighten the last three columns? I would post a pic of the output but i am a new user and it will not let me.

width = int(input("Please enter the width of the table:"))
def print_times_table(width):

    row = 0
    col = 0
    width += 1
    spaces = '  '

    while row < width:
        col = 0
        while col < width:

            print(row*col, spaces, end="")
            col += 1
        print("\n", end='')
        row +=1

print_times_table(width)

output: http://i.stack.imgur.com/C9AzE.jpg

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1  
If this is homework, you should say so... –  Triptych Sep 26 '12 at 23:52
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3 Answers

First, you don't need a picture; you should be able to show the output as text just by indenting four spaces (or using the {} icon):

Please enter the width of the table:4
0   0   0   0   0   
0   1   2   3   4   
0   2   4   6   8   
0   3   6   9   12   
0   4   8   12   16   

The problem is that you're assuming each number will be the same width. This works up to 3x3, because everything is one character wide, but for 5x5, some numbers are one character, some are two (and of course it gets even worse at 10x10).

The easy way to fix this is to force each cell to be the same width.

First, you have to calculate the biggest size you'll need. But that's easy: it's the size of width*width.

Next, you have to know how to force the numbers to use up that many characters. Python has a few ways to do this. I'll show how to do it with old-fashioned field specifiers, but you should look into how to convert this to new-style format strings. (If this is homework, someone teaching you Python 3 will probably grade you down for using old-style fieldspecs. If it's just for your own self-education, it's worth figuring out how to do it both ways.) Or, alternatively, you should look at how to convert it to use a variable-width format spec ('%*d') instead of building a static '%4d' spec. (nneonneo's answer should give a clue to that.)

width = int(input("Please enter the width of the table:"))
def print_times_table(width):

    row = 0
    col = 0    
    fieldspec = '%' + str(len(str(width * width))) + 'd'
    width += 1

    while row < width:
        col = 0
        while col < width:

            print(fieldspec % (row*col,), ' ', end="")
            col += 1
        print("\n", end='')
        row +=1

print_times_table(width)

Now you get:

Please enter the width of the table:4
 0   0   0   0   0  
 0   1   2   3   4  
 0   2   4   6   8  
 0   3   6   9  12  
 0   4   8  12  16  
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Great detail! I think this would be a little bit cleaner if you used a variable width field specifier, like in the other answer. –  Sam Mussmann Sep 27 '12 at 0:02
    
@SamMussmann: Actually, that's another good "exercise for the reader". I'll edit the answer. –  abarnert Sep 27 '12 at 0:08
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Use a variable-width field specifier:

print('%*d' % (8, row*col), end='')

This automatically adds enough padding to fill the number out to (here) 8 spaces. You can pass that spacing parameter in as an argument, too.

To use a variable width using the new-style formatting syntax:

print('{:{width}}'.format(row*col, width=8), end='')
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why not just use your variable in combonation with .ljust? like so:

width = int(13)
def table(width):

row = 1
col = 1
width += 1
spaces = '  '

while row < width:
    col = 1
    while col < width:
        print(str(row*col).rjust(5, ' '), end="")
        col += 1
    print("\n", end='')
    row +=1

table(width)

it works the exact same(you can use whatever numbers you wish, doesn't matter) and just adjust accordingly depending on how large your numbers are getting...

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