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How can I use a "goto" statement to break out of a loop

for(i = 0; (i < 9); i++)
    {
        for(j = 0; j < 9; j++)
        {
            //cout << " " << Matrix[i][j];
            //cout << "i: " << i << endl;
            if(Matrix[i][j] == 0)
            {
                //temp = 10;
                [goto] ;
                //break;
            }
        }
    }

I wanted to keep the values at which i and j were when I left the nested for loop. How can I use a goto statement for that?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Like this:

int i,j;
for(i = 0; i < 9; i++)
{
    for(j = 0; j < 9; j++)
    {
        //cout << " " << Matrix[i][j];
        //cout << "i: " << i << endl;
        if(Matrix[i][j] == 0)
        {
            //temp = 10;
            goto end;
            //break;
        }
    }
}
end:
cout << i << " " << j << endl;
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Just as you use goto in any other situation. As long as you don't cross scopes with local variables in them, you can actually think of it as "goto this and that line":

for (/* ... */) {
  /* ... */
  if (/* ... */)
    goto finalise;
}
finalise:
  foo = bar; //...

However, there are many situations when goto is an indicator for not well designed code. By no means always, but often.

I suggest you use gotos big brother return and factor out your code into a function:

inline std::pair<int,int> findZeroEntry(std::vector matrix) {
  for (int i = 0; i < 9; i++)
    for (int j = 0; j < 9; j++)
      if (Matrix[i][j] == 0)
        return std::make_pair(i,j);
  return std::make_pair(9,9); // error
}
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1  
+1 you beat me to it. this is what the OP should have selected as "the solution". well ok i planned on using a local lambda, but anyway. –  Cheers and hth. - Alf Sep 27 '12 at 1:32
    
@Downvoter: Could you offer any indication what is wrong here? –  bitmask Oct 26 '13 at 7:41
    
no, no, no factoring into a solution is just stupid so many times, you break temporal logic flow and force user to navigate somewhere else, especially in many situations where it's simply a complex function and Should Not Be Broken Up. there are many, many situations where goto is the RIGHT way to design the code, but nobody in CS academia has ever experienced those so they handwave and cause countless problems for noobs like me that wasted years trying to avoid goto in my embedded code. –  bennnnn Aug 5 '14 at 21:23
1  
@Rancur3p1c: As Alf points out, factoring out a function can be done using a lambda as well. If it's logically sensible to have the "to-be-factored-out" function close to the surrounding code, use an anonymous lambda. I'm sorry that academics gave you poor advise and wasted your time and agree that it is unreasonable to think in absolutes as "gotos are evil, never use them". –  bitmask Aug 6 '14 at 11:02

Well, @bitmask's answer has already said most of what I thought of saying when I read the question.

But for completeness, here's another technique:

Matrix              m;
Index2D< 9, 9 >     pos;

for( ; pos < pos.end();  ++pos )
{
    if( m( pos.x(), pos.y() ) == 0 )
    {
        break;
    }
}
cout << pos.x() << " " << pos.y() << endl;

IMHO this is far more clear code.

Also, the matrix can then be made to support indexing via Index2D values, thus reducing the above to just …

Matrix              m;
Index2D< 9, 9 >     pos;

for( ; pos < pos.end();  ++pos )
{
    if( m[pos] == 0 )
    {
        break;
    }
}
cout << pos.x() << " " << pos.y() << endl;

Since there’s nothing like Index2D in the standard library, it needs to be defined somewhere, e.g. like

template< int width, int height >
struct Index2D
{
    int         i_;

    int x() const { return i_ % width; }
    int y() const { return i_ / width; }

    void operator++() { ++i_; }

    bool operator<( Index2D const& other ) const
    {
        return (i_ < other.i_);
    }

    Index2D(): i_( 0 ) {}

    Index2D( int const x, int const y )
        : i_( width*y + x )
    {}

    static const Index2D endValue;
    static Index2D end() { return endValue; }
};

template< int width, int height >
Index2D< width, height > const Index2D< width, height >::endValue( 0, height );

But then it can be reused everywhere that you need this functionality.

share|improve this answer
    
I like the idea of a 2d iterator. Just one nit: I'd make endValue local to end(). –  bitmask Sep 27 '12 at 6:46

You don't need goto to leave the nested for loop and save off those variables. Merely, you want to break out of each loop successively. Just have a boolean at the appropriate scope level that you check to know if need to break out of the loops.

Corrected example

IE:

bool HasFoundZero = false;
for(i = 0; i < 9; i++)
{
    for(j = 0; j < 9; j++)
    {
        //cout << " " << Matrix[i][j];
        //cout << "i: " << i << endl;
        if(Matrix[i][j] == 0)
        {
            //temp = 10;
                HasFoundZero = true;
        }
        if(HasFoundZero)
        {
            break;
        }
    }
    if(HasFoundZero)
    {
        break;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
you mean hasfound"zero" = true :D –  Josh Sep 27 '12 at 0:52
3  
All this does is hide the fact that you are using goto. It's still a goto, just with a boolean to obfuscate and slow things down. Why obfuscate? Just use goto. I'd prefer to see that verboten goto used to break out of an inner loop over a boolean that hides the fact that a goto is being used. Other languages provide a multi-level break. C/C++ does not. That C/C++ does not is a language defect. –  David Hammen Sep 27 '12 at 1:15
    
Besides the fact that this is not that much better than the goto, and it has extra cost (one test per iteration in each of the loops), this answer does not comply with the requirement that he wants the values of i and j where the object was found (i in this case will be the location plus one) –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Sep 27 '12 at 2:13
    
@Josh: Woops. What I get for typing it up in Notepad++. @DavidHammen: By that logic, why use a for loop? It's just hiding your gotos. In fact, why ever use break, by that logic? break is safer in usage. There's a reason why it exists. Your logic could even extend to switch or while being unnecessary... @DavidRodríguez-dribeas: I corrected the example. Any good compiler will optimize further. More importantly, this is easier to maintain than gotos and labels. As well, in this simple example, is there anything to suggest that one condition test is a performance concern? –  Sion Sheevok Sep 27 '12 at 3:04
2  
The goto solution is way more readable than this... –  fredoverflow Sep 27 '12 at 6:04

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