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Note: This question has been renamed and reduced to make it more focused and readable. Most of the comments refer to the old text.

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According to the standard, objects of different type may not share the same memory location. So this would not be legal:

std::array<short, 4> shorts;
int* i = reinterpret_cast<int*>(shorts.data()); // Not OK

The standard, however, allows an exception to this rule: any object may be accessed through a pointer to char or unsigned char:

int i = 0;
char * c = reinterpret_cast<char*>(&i); // OK

However, it is not clear to me whether this is also allowed the other way around. For example:

char * c = read_socket(...);
unsigned * u = reinterpret_cast<unsigned*>(c); // huh?
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3  
I don't believe the second one is valid. Dereferencing i will break strict-aliasing. – Mysticial Sep 27 '12 at 0:47
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This is where memcpy comes in... – ildjarn Sep 27 '12 at 0:48
    
@Mysticial doesn't new int do something like static_cast<int*>(malloc(sizeof(int)) under the hood? – StackedCrooked Sep 27 '12 at 0:49
    
What does new int have to do with it? EDIT: Oh, I believe malloc() is one of the exceptions. I'm not exactly sure what the standard says. But going back to you second case, suppose c is misaligned and the processor doesn't support misaligned access. – Mysticial Sep 27 '12 at 0:50
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alignas(int) char c[sizeof(int)]; should be enough to obtain proper storage for an int. std::aligned_storage<sizeof(int), alignof(int)>::type c; is an alternative. – Luc Danton Sep 27 '12 at 1:21
up vote 11 down vote accepted

Some of your code is questionable due to the pointer conversions involved. Keep in mind that in those instances reinterpret_cast<T*>(e) has the semantics of static_cast<T*>(static_cast<void*>(e)) because the types that are involved are standard-layout. (I would in fact recommend that you always use static_cast via cv void* when dealing with storage.)

A close reading of the Standard suggests that during a pointer conversion to or from T* it is assumed that there really is an actual object T* involved -- which is hard to fulfill in some of your snippet, even when 'cheating' thanks to the triviality of types involved (more on this later). That would be besides the point however because...

Aliasing is not about pointer conversions. This is the C++11 text that outlines the rules that are commonly referred to as 'strict aliasing' rules, from 3.10 Lvalues and rvalues [basic.lval]:

10 If a program attempts to access the stored value of an object through a glvalue of other than one of the following types the behavior is undefined:

  • the dynamic type of the object,
  • a cv-qualified version of the dynamic type of the object,
  • a type similar (as defined in 4.4) to the dynamic type of the object,
  • a type that is the signed or unsigned type corresponding to the dynamic type of the object,
  • a type that is the signed or unsigned type corresponding to a cv-qualified version of the dynamic type of the object,
  • an aggregate or union type that includes one of the aforementioned types among its elements or non-static data members (including, recursively, an element or non-static data member of a subaggregate or contained union),
  • a type that is a (possibly cv-qualified) base class type of the dynamic type of the object,
  • a char or unsigned char type.

(This is paragraph 15 of the same clause and subclause in C++03, with some minor changes in the text with e.g. 'lvalue' being used instead of 'glvalue' since the latter is a C++11 notion.)

In the light of those rules, let's assume that an implementation provides us with magic_cast<T*>(p) which 'somehow' converts a pointer to another pointer type. Normally this would be reinterpret_cast, which yields unspecified results in some cases, but as I've explained before this is not so for pointers to standard-layout types. Then it's plainly true that all of your snippets are correct (substituting reinterpret_cast with magic_cast), because no glvalues are involved whatsoever with the results of magic_cast.

Here is a snippet that appears to incorrectly use magic_cast, but which I will argue is correct:

// assume constexpr max
constexpr auto alignment = max(alignof(int), alignof(short));
alignas(alignment) char c[sizeof(int)];
// I'm assuming here that the OP really meant to use &c and not c
// this is, however, inconsequential
auto p = magic_cast<int*>(&c);
*p = 42;
*magic_cast<short*>(p) = 42;

To justify my reasoning, assume this superficially different snippet:

// alignment same as before
alignas(alignment) char c[sizeof(int)];

auto p = magic_cast<int*>(&c);
// end lifetime of c
c.~decltype(c)();
// reuse storage to construct new int object
new (&c) int;

*p = 42;

auto q = magic_cast<short*>(p);
// end lifetime of int object
p->~decltype(0)();
// reuse storage again
new (p) short;

*q = 42;

This snippet is carefully constructed. In particular, in new (&c) int; I'm allowed to use &c even though c was destroyed due to the rules laid out in paragraph 5 of 3.8 Object lifetime [basic.life]. Paragraph 6 of same gives very similar rules to references to storage, and paragraph 7 explains what happens to variables, pointers and references that used to refer to an object once its storage is reused -- I will refer collectively to those as 3.8/5-7.

In this instance &c is (implicitly) converted to void*, which is one of the correct use of a pointer to storage that has not been yet reused. Similarly p is obtained from &c before the new int is constructed. Its definition could perhaps be moved to after the destruction of c, depending on how deep the implementation magic is, but certainly not after the int construction: paragraph 7 would apply and this is not one of the allowed situations. The construction of the short object also relies on p becoming a pointer to storage.

Now, because int and short are trivial types, I don't have to use the explicit calls to destructors. I don't need the explicit calls to the constructors, either (that is to say, the calls to the usual, Standard placement new declared in <new>). From 3.8 Object lifetime [basic.life]:

1 [...] The lifetime of an object of type T begins when:

  • storage with the proper alignment and size for type T is obtained, and
  • if the object has non-trivial initialization, its initialization is complete.

The lifetime of an object of type T ends when:

  • if T is a class type with a non-trivial destructor (12.4), the destructor call starts, or
  • the storage which the object occupies is reused or released.

This means that I can rewrite the code such that, after folding the intermediate variable q, I end up with the original snippet.

Do note that p cannot be folded away. That is to say, the following is defintively incorrect:

alignas(alignment) char c[sizeof(int)];
*magic_cast<int*>(&c) = 42;
*magic_cast<short*>(&c) = 42;

If we assume that an int object is (trivially) constructed with the second line, then that must mean &c becomes a pointer to storage that has been reused. Thus the third line is incorrect -- although due to 3.8/5-7 and not due to aliasing rules strictly speaking.

If we don't assume that, then the second line is a violation of aliasing rules: we're reading what is actually a char c[sizeof(int)] object through a glvalue of type int, which is not one of the allowed exception. By comparison, *magic_cast<unsigned char>(&c) = 42; would be fine (we would assume a short object is trivially constructed on the third line).

Just like Alf, I would also recommend that you explicitly make use of the Standard placement new when using storage. Skipping destruction for trivial types is fine, but when encountering *some_magic_pointer = foo; you're very much likely facing either a violation of 3.8/5-7 (no matter how magically that pointer was obtained) or of the aliasing rules. This means storing the result of the new expression, too, since you most likely can't reuse the magic pointer once your object is constructed -- due to 3.8/5-7 again.

Reading the bytes of an object (this means using char or unsigned char) is fine however, and you don't even to use reinterpret_cast or anything magic at all. static_cast via cv void* is arguably fine for the job (although I do feel like the Standard could use some better wording there).

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the comprehensive overview. – StackedCrooked Sep 29 '12 at 1:13
    
Why is it possible to use void* as an alias? (It's not in the list of authorized types.) – Alexandre Hamez Sep 3 '14 at 6:55
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@AlexandreHamez Note that void is incomplete. So you can have a void* that hold the same address as another pointer (one of the meanings of aliasing), but it’s okay because you cannot read from it anyway—and the so-called aliasing rules of C++ are concerned with reading. And in fact passing around address values, in any guise, cannot on its own run afoul of aliasing rules (but there are plenty of other rules…). Does that make sense to you? (I would improve this answer if you feel some parts aren’t clear enough.) – Luc Danton Sep 3 '14 at 7:42
    
@LucDanton Thank you, it's more clear now. I didn't realize that reading from a pointer was the key. If I understand it correctly, it means that as long as I'm not reading from a pointer which may have an incorrect type (regarding aliasing rules), then everything's fine. I thought creating a pointer with an incorrect type was sufficient to break aliasing. – Alexandre Hamez Sep 3 '14 at 9:16
    
@AlexandreHamez That’s exactly it. – Luc Danton Sep 3 '14 at 9:20

This too:

// valid: char -> type
alignas(int) char c[sizeof(int)];
int * i = reinterpret_cast<int*>(c);

That is not correct. The aliasing rules state under which circumstances it is legal/illegal to access an object through an lvalue of a different type. There is an specific rule that says that you can access any object through a pointer of type char or unsigned char, so the first case is correct. That is, A => B does not necessarily mean B => A. You can access an int through a pointer to char, but you cannot access a char through a pointer to int.


For the benefit of Alf:

If a program attempts to access the stored value of an object through a glvalue of other than one of the following types the behavior is undefined:

  • the dynamic type of the object,
  • a cv-qualified version of the dynamic type of the object,
  • a type similar (as defined in 4.4) to the dynamic type of the object,
  • a type that is the signed or unsigned type corresponding to the dynamic type of the object,
  • a type that is the signed or unsigned type corresponding to a cv-qualified version of the dynamic type of the object,
  • an aggregate or union type that includes one of the aforementioned types among its elements or non- static data members (including, recursively, an element or non-static data member of a subaggregate or contained union),
  • a type that is a (possibly cv-qualified) base class type of the dynamic type of the object,
  • a char or unsigned char type.
share|improve this answer
2  
@Cheersandhth.-Alf: placement new passes a buffer (void*) to the allocator function. The allocator function then uses that buffer to create an object. Note that according to the lifetime rules, at that point in time the char objects in the buffer end their lifetime. That is not aliasing. new (c) int(5) creates an integer of value 5 in the buffer. The buffer is now an int. reinterpret_cast<int*>(c) = 5 aliases the chars in the buffer as if they were an int. Unless you are claiming that reinterpret_cast<int*>(c) and new (c) int are equivalent... – David Rodríguez - dribeas Sep 27 '12 at 2:58
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@Cheersandhth.-Alf: I never claimed that, the aliasing rules (again, take the time to read §3.10/10) don't deal with the static, but the dynamic type of an object. Again, if I am wrong, correct me --with a quote from the standard, not just with opinions. – David Rodríguez - dribeas Sep 27 '12 at 3:04
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@ildjarn: You can access an int through a pointer to char, but you cannot access a char through a pointer to int. In the code above the objects in memory are char, and the reinterpret_cast<int*> creates an alias of type int*. You cannot use an int* to access a (or multiple) char objects. – David Rodríguez - dribeas Sep 27 '12 at 3:26
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@Cheersandhth.-Alf: You added the [array] yourself, I didn't. If you want me to completely spell it out: you cannot access a char object through a pointer to int The point is that in the code, the char array holds char objects, and you cannot access them (the objects) through a pointer to int. If there was a placement new in the code, then the int would have ended the lifetime of the char objects according to the lifetime rules as the memory is reused for a different object, and at that point you would be accessing an int object stored in a char array. – David Rodríguez - dribeas Sep 27 '12 at 3:39
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@Cheersandhth.-Alf: Again, your opinion vs. the wording of the standard. Unless I have misinterpreted them, in which case, please do tell me what the standard intends, provide a quote that contradicts what I said. I will be the first to remove the answer if it is wrong. BTW, I find your last comment offensive. If you have facts do tell, if not at least avoid being rude. What in the quote of the standard above is not clear? (That would be a constructive thing to do, rather than trolling) – David Rodríguez - dribeas Sep 27 '12 at 3:44

Regarding the validity of …

alignas(int) char c[sizeof(int)];
int * i = reinterpret_cast<int*>(c);

The reinterpret_cast itself is OK or not, in the sense of producing a useful pointer value, depending on the compiler. And in this example the result isn't used, in particular, the character array isn't accessed. So there is not much more that can be said about the example as-is: it just depends.

But let's consider an extended version that does touch on the aliasing rules:

void foo( char* );

alignas(int) char c[sizeof( int )];

foo( c );
int* p = reinterpret_cast<int*>( c );
cout << *p << endl;

And let's only consider the case where the compiler guarantees a useful pointer value, one that would place the pointee in the same bytes of memory (the reason that this depends on the compiler is that the standard, in §5.2.10/7, only guarantees it for pointer conversions where the types are alignment-compatible, and otherwise leave it as "unspecified" (but then, the whole of §5.2.10 is somewhat inconsistent with §9.2/18).

Now, one interpretation of the standard's §3.10/10, the so called "strict aliasing" clause (but note that the standard does not ever use the term "strict aliasing"),

If a program attempts to access the stored value of an object through a glvalue of other than one of the following types the behavior is undefined:

  • the dynamic type of the object,
  • a cv-qualified version of the dynamic type of the object,
  • a type similar (as defined in 4.4) to the dynamic type of the object,
  • a type that is the signed or unsigned type corresponding to the dynamic type of the object,
  • a type that is the signed or unsigned type corresponding to a cv-qualified version of the dynamic type of the object,
  • an aggregate or union type that includes one of the aforementioned types among its elements or non- static data members (including, recursively, an element or non-static data member of a subaggregate or contained union),
  • a type that is a (possibly cv-qualified) base class type of the dynamic type of the object,
  • a char or unsigned char type.

is that, as it itself says, concerns the dynamic type of the object residing in the c bytes.

With that interpretation, the read operation on *p is OK if foo has placed an int object there, and otherwise not. So in this case, a char array is accessed via an int* pointer. And nobody is in any doubt that the other way is valid: even though foo may have placed an int object in those bytes, you can freely access that object as a sequence of char values, by the last dash of §3.10/10.

So with this (usual) interpretation, after foo has placed an int there, we can access it as char objects, so at least one char object exists within the memory region named c; and we can access it as int, so at least that one int exists there also; and so David’s assertion in another answer that char objects cannot be accessed as int, is incompatible with this usual interpretation.

David's assertion is also incompatible with the most common use of placement new.

Regarding what other possible interpretations there are, that perhaps could be compatible with David's assertion, well, I can't think of any that make sense.

So in conclusion, as far as the Holy Standard is concerned, merely casting oneself a T* pointer to the array is practically useful or not depending on the compiler, and accessing the pointed to could-be-value is valid or not depending on what's present. In particular, think of a trap representation of int: you would not want that blowing up on you, if the bitpattern happened to be that. So to be safe you have to know what's in there, the bits, and as the call to foo above illustrates the compiler can in general not know that, like, the g++ compiler's strict alignment-based optimizer can in general not know that…

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3  
You have not understood what I said. My assertion is that a char object cannot be accessed through an int pointer. Your assertion is that once you replace the char object with an int object through placement new you can access the int object through an int pointer. You are not accessing a char through the int pointer, you are accessing an int that was created in the same memory location previously held by (multiple) char objects. Learn to read. – David Rodríguez - dribeas Sep 27 '12 at 12:09
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So, is your claim that this is correct or incorrect (assume 32bit int): float f; int* p = new (&f) int(1); cout << *p;. And if it is incorrect, why? Note that I did not use dynamic in the sense of holding RTTI information, but as the actual type of the object in the memory location. Is there a float object after placement new? (If you think there is, read the object lifetime chapter in the standard) Is it legal to do cout << f after the placement new? What you fail to see is that you are saying the same thing I said, but failing to see they are the same thing. – David Rodríguez - dribeas Sep 27 '12 at 12:29
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Your last comment says quite a lot about you. I am sorry that you are like that but I cannot make you a better person. – David Rodríguez - dribeas Sep 27 '12 at 12:39
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:) Your last comment is enlightnening. You know what ad hominem means right? It means avoiding the argument and rather focus on a personal defect. My last comment was not avoiding the argument, you already did that before. That comment is just an statement of truth (opinion if you like). You are the one avoiding to argue on the example I provided and claiming that you can read my mind (with limited success, to be honest.. that you know that is so off target) So, no, you don't understand why [I] go to ad hominem, as that premise is false. – David Rodríguez - dribeas Sep 27 '12 at 18:56
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I don't really believe that people downvote to support another answer, more so considering that I did not get equivalent up votes. On the other hand, there is someone that has up voted some of the comments. Go figure. – David Rodríguez - dribeas Sep 28 '12 at 2:58

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