Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Past midnight and maybe someone has an idea how to tackle a problem of mine. I want to count the number of adjacent cells (which means the number of array fields with other values eg. zeroes in the vicinity of array values) as sum for each valid value!.

Example:

import numpy, scipy
s = ndimage.generate_binary_structure(2,2) # Structure can vary
a = numpy.zeros((6,6), dtype=numpy.int) # Example array
a[2:4, 2:4] = 1;a[2,4] = 1 # with example value structure
print a 
>[[0 0 0 0 0 0]
  [0 0 0 0 0 0]
  [0 0 1 1 1 0]
  [0 0 1 1 0 0]
  [0 0 0 0 0 0]
  [0 0 0 0 0 0]]
# The value at position [2,4] is surrounded by 6 zeros, while the one at
# position [2,2] has 5 zeros in the vicinity if 's' is the assumed binary structure. 
# Total sum of surrounding zeroes is therefore sum(5+4+6+4+5) == 24

How can i count the number of zeroes in such way if the structure of my values vary? I somehow believe to must take use of the binary_dilation function of SciPy, which is able to enlarge the value structure, but simple counting of overlaps can't lead me to the correct sum or does it?

print ndimage.binary_dilation(a,s).astype(a.dtype)
[[0 0 0 0 0 0]
 [0 1 1 1 1 1]
 [0 1 1 1 1 1]
 [0 1 1 1 1 1]
 [0 1 1 1 1 0]
 [0 0 0 0 0 0]]
share|improve this question
    
I'm not entirely clear on what you want here. So given a position, you want to know the number of neighbors whose value == 0? If you know the shape of the array (to find discover the edges) you can use simple math... annoying, time consuming (to write and process), but pretty straight forward. –  monkut Sep 27 '12 at 2:16

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Use a convolution to count neighbours:

import numpy
import scipy.signal

a = numpy.zeros((6,6), dtype=numpy.int) # Example array
a[2:4, 2:4] = 1;a[2,4] = 1 # with example value structure

b = 1-a
c = scipy.signal.convolve2d(b, numpy.ones((3,3)), mode='same')

print numpy.sum(c * a)

b = 1-a allows us to count each zero while ignoring the ones.

We convolve with a 3x3 all-ones kernel, which sets each element to the sum of it and its 8 neighbouring values (other kernels are possible, such as the + kernel for only orthogonally adjacent values). With these summed values, we mask off the zeros in the original input (since we don't care about their neighbours), and sum over the whole array.

share|improve this answer
1  
I was just about to post almost the same answer: (a * ndimage.convolve((a == 0).astype(int), s)).sum() –  Warren Weckesser Sep 27 '12 at 3:16
    
yeah, that exactly want i wanted. Great! –  Curlew Sep 27 '12 at 10:08

I think you already got it. after dilation, the number of 1 is 19, minus 5 of the starting shape, you have 14. which is the number of zeros surrounding your shape. Your total of 24 has overlaps.

share|improve this answer
    
This can't be the right answer. Consider a 1 surrounded by 8 zeros. The correct answer is 8, but you will see 9 1s in the output, and your approach would add one to give 10. –  nneonneo Sep 27 '12 at 3:17
    
it should be 9 - 1 –  swang Sep 27 '12 at 3:23
    
Oh, sorry. You were counting surrounding zeros without overlaps. I think the poster wanted overlaps. But your solution is right for counting without overlap. –  nneonneo Sep 27 '12 at 3:25

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.