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Converting a for loop to a while loop

def splitList(myList, option):
    snappyList = []
    for i in myList:
        if option == 0:
            if i > 0:
                snappyList.append(i)
        if option == 1:
            if i < 0:
                snappyList.append(i)
    return (snappyList)

Hi, I have this code the works great under the for loop. It returns the elements either positive or negative based upon what the user enters. I need to get this working under a while loop and I'm not sure how to get it to work without it being caught in a while loop.

Any ideas or tips would be appreciated, thanks!

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marked as duplicate by Marcin, Toon Krijthe, pad, hjpotter92, stema Sep 27 '12 at 6:43

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

2  
You'll probably get more useful answers if you explain why you need it in a while form, and what you expect that to do for you. The obvious transforms into a while loop just reduce readability of the loop. –  Michael Anderson Sep 27 '12 at 1:34
1  
This is a strange question, although that it no way implies you should not have asked it. :) I was thinking the more reasonable question, since this is Python, would be: how do I make this code more Pythonic? Then someone would come in with a list comprehension.... –  Ray Toal Sep 27 '12 at 1:34
    
As a side note: You may want to split the loop into two loops based on the option, so as to avoid an if inside the loop. –  Michael Anderson Sep 27 '12 at 1:35
1  
This is homework. It's the third identical question (at least) today. –  Marcin Sep 27 '12 at 3:52

6 Answers 6

Try the following:

def splitList(myList, option):
    snappyList = []
    i = 0
    while i < len(myList):
        if option == 0:
            if myList[i] > 0:
                snappyList.append(myList[i])
        if option == 1:
            if myList[i] < 0:
                snappyList.append(myList[i])
        i+=1
    return (snappyList)
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks a bunch! It works out great! –  Subtlyinyourmind Sep 27 '12 at 1:34
    
Your welcome mate ;) –  Littm Sep 27 '12 at 1:35

At the risk of attracting downvotes for not adhering rigorously to your question, Python has better facilities for (simple) loops than many other more traditional languages. (I realise also, based on how there have been very similar questions this morning, that this might be homework). Learning how while loops work has some value, obviously, but doing so in Python obscures the other facilities. For example, your example using a single list comprehension:

def splitList2(myList, option):
    return [v for v in myList if (1-2*option)*v > 0]

print(splitList2([1,2,3,-10,4,5,6], 0))
print(splitList2([1,2,3,-10,4,5,6], 1))

output:

[1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6]
[-10]
>>> 

The syntax of the conditional in the comprehension only looks complicated because your mapping of option to effect is poor. In Python, as in many other dynamic and functional languages, you can pass in the comparison function directly:

def splitList3(myList, condition):
    return [v for v in myList if condition(v)]

print(splitList3([1,2,3,-10,4,5,6], lambda v: v>0))
print(splitList3([1,2,3,-10,4,5,6], lambda v: v<0))
print(splitList3([1,2,3,-10,4,5,6], lambda v: v%2==0))

[1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6]
[-10]
[2, -10, 4, 6]
>>>     

Notice how much more flexible that is: it becomes trivial to adapt the code to a completely different filter condition.

share|improve this answer
def splitList(myList, option):
    snappyList = []
    myListCpy=list(myList[:]) #copy the list, in case the caller cares about it being changed, and convert it to a list (in case it was a tuple or similar)
    while myListCpy:  #There's at least one element in the list.
        i=myListCpy.pop(0)  #Remove the first element, the rest continues as before.
        if option == 0:
            if i > 0:
                snappyList.append(i)
        if option == 1:
            if i < 0:
                snappyList.append(i)
    return (snappyList)
share|improve this answer
def splitList(myList, option):
    snappyList = []
    while len(myList) > 0:
        i = myList.pop()
        if option == 0:
            if i > 0:
                snappyList.append(i)
        if option == 1:
            if i < 0:
                snappyList.append(i)
    return snappyList
share|improve this answer
    
The problem with this solution is that if the caller expects myList to remain unaltered, you'll break the rest of the program. Need to make a copy of the list first, also, since everything in python is True if it is not False, and an empty list is False, checking if the len(List) > 0 is slower than it needs to be, you can just check if List, which is True if the list is not empty. –  Perkins Sep 27 '12 at 1:39
def splitList(myList, option):
    snappyList = []
    myList_iter = iter(myList)
    sentinel = object()
    while True:
        i = next(myList_iter, sentinel)
        if i == sentinel:
            break
        if option == 0:
            if i > 0:
                snappyList.append(i)
        if option == 1:
            if i < 0:
                snappyList.append(i)
    return (snappyList)

Alternatively, you can use an exception handler instead of the sentinel

def splitList(myList, option):
    snappyList = []
    myList_iter = iter(myList)
    while True:
        try:
            i = next(myList_iter)
        except StopIteration:
            break
        if option == 0:
            if i > 0:
                snappyList.append(i)
        if option == 1:
            if i < 0:
                snappyList.append(i)
    return (snappyList)
share|improve this answer

Here's a concise way to actually split a list, rather than just filter it:

from operator import ge,lt
def splitlist(input, test=ge, pivot=0):
    left = []
    right = []
    for target, val in (((left if test(n, pivot) else right), n) for n in input):
        target.append(val)

    return left, right

You'll note that it uses a for loop, because it's the right way to do things.

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