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I would like to get the address of an array pointer. The prototype codes are as following:

program main

    implicit none

    type foo
        integer, allocatable :: i(:)
        integer j
    end type

    type(foo) a
    integer, pointer :: ai(:)

    ai => a%i

    print *, "The address of a is ", loc(a)
    print *, "The address of a%i is", loc(ai) ! <--- I expect the same address as a.

end program main

My final target is to get the address of a with type(foo) through the address of array pointer ai, since i is the first part of type(foo).

Thanks in advance!

Li

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2 Answers 2

Fortran doesn't guarantee that the first item of a user-defined the same address as that user-defined type. Maybe there is a header before the items. Maybe there is some padding. Maybe the compiler stores the items in a different order. Maybe different compilers do it differently. None of this is specified. So your expectation may not occur. There is little need in Fortran for addresses. What are you trying to do? If you are interfacing to C, the ISO_C_Binding provides C_LOC.

EDIT in response to the comment. If your goal is to simplifying the variable name by omitting the leading "a %", you can use a pointer to create an alternative variable that accesses the same storage. You don't have to try to get past the language with pointers. Example:

program main

    implicit none

    type foo
        integer, pointer :: i(:)
        integer j
    end type

    type(foo) a
    integer, pointer :: ai(:)

    allocate ( a%i (5) )
    a%i = [ 2, 5, 1, 3, 9 ]
    ai => a%i

    write (*, '( "a%i=", 5(2X,I2) )' ) a%i
    write (*, '( "ai=", 5(2X,I2) )' ) ai

end program main

Output is:

a%i=   2   5   1   3   9
ai=   2   5   1   3   9
share|improve this answer
    
I am designing a data type, which contains a data array. User would like to use the data array explicitly without typing "%" to simplify the codes, and Fortran doesn't has index operator. At some stage, the other information in data type will be needed, so I have to get the data type from the data array's address. –  Li Dong Sep 27 '12 at 2:41
    
I would prefer staying with the allocatable component and add the target attribute, if the OP uses taht in his code. It prevents memory leaks. –  Vladimir F Sep 27 '12 at 6:50
    
@VladimirF, that was also my first approach for the reason that you state. The compilers are telling me that the combination "allocatable, target" is not allowed for a component of a user-defined type. –  M. S. B. Sep 27 '12 at 14:28
    
Ok, good to know. –  Vladimir F Sep 27 '12 at 14:48

You can't, not using standard Fortran anyway.

Note that your expectations are misplaced.

loc is an extension. What it does is processor specific, but typically it will give you an integer representation of the address of the data object that the argument represents. (The F2003 standard's C_LOC is roughly equivalent.). In this case, the data object is an allocatable array. In all processors that I am aware of the storage for that array is not in the storage for the object of derived type that hosts the allocatable component. The derived type object simply contains a descriptor that describes where the array is stored (and how big it is, etc), not storage for the array itself.

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