Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

And what factors would cause me to choose one or the other?

share|improve this question

5 Answers 5

up vote 107 down vote accepted

Time is a wrapper around POSIX-standard time_t, or seconds since January 1, 1970. This can be expressed as a positive or negative number, and is bounded:

Time.at(0x7FFFFFFF)
# => Mon Jan 18 22:14:07 -0500 2038
Time.at(-0x7FFFFFFF)
# => Fri Dec 13 15:45:53 -0500 1901

Values outside those bounds produce an error in 1.8.7. Update: 1.9.2 does seem able to handle larger values.

In contrast, DateTime is much more open-ended. The more robust version is a Ruby on Rails construct that serves as a wrapper around SQL-standard DATETIME fields. These contain arbitrary dates and can represent nearly any point in time as the range of expression is typically very large.

DateTime.new
# => Mon, 01 Jan -4712 00:00:00 +0000

So it's reassuring that DateTime can handle blog posts from Aristotle.

share|improve this answer
3  
So should I always use DateTime? –  Horace Loeb Aug 11 '09 at 16:41
3  
If you're working with dates, I'd say use DateTime. Time is convenient for representing things such as current time of day, or points in the near future such as 10.minutes.from_now. The two have a lot in common, though as noted DateTime can represent a much wider range of values. –  tadman Aug 11 '09 at 16:44
    
> Time is convenient for representing things such as current time of day, or points in the near future such as 10.minutes.from_now. Why is Time more convenient than DateTime for this purpose? –  Horace Loeb Aug 11 '09 at 17:38
2  
I believe that's because Ruby switches to arbitrary-length Bignum from 32-bit Fixnum when it experiences an overflow. Numbers outside of that range may not be supported by external applications. Yes, in 2038 we're basically screwed until we can all agree on a proper 64-bit time format. Jury is still out. –  tadman May 10 '12 at 17:44
15  
This answer predates 1.9.2. Ignore everything it says about the posix limitations of Time, and make your choice based on the APIs of Time and DateTime. –  Ben Nagy May 26 '12 at 5:57

The performance difference can't be emphasized enough... Time is C, and DateTime is Ruby:

>> Benchmark.bm do |bm|
?>   bm.report('DateTime:') do
?>     n1 = DateTime.now
>>     n2 = DateTime.now
>>     1_000_000.times{ n1 < n2 }
>>   end
>>   bm.report('Time:    ') do
?>     n1 = Time.now
>>     n2 = Time.now
>>     1_000_000.times{ n1 < n2 }
>>   end
>> end
      user     system      total        real
DateTime:  4.980000   0.020000   5.000000 (  5.063963)
Time:      0.330000   0.000000   0.330000 (  0.335913)

Update (2/2012):

As already mentioned in the comment, 1.9.3 has vastly improved DateTime performance:

       user     system      total        real
DateTime:  0.330000   0.000000   0.330000 (  0.333869)
Time:      0.300000   0.000000   0.300000 (  0.306444)
share|improve this answer
15  
Update: Ruby 1.9.3 should bring faster DateTime implemented in C: rubyinside.com/ruby-1-9-3-preview-1-released-5229.html so this answer hopefully might not be relevant for much longer. –  Mladen Jablanović Aug 4 '11 at 18:50
1  
I ran your code in ruby 2.0.0-p247 and my results are vastly different. With DateTime being much faster (5 times) DateTime: 0.520000 0.010000 0.530000 ( 0.522596) | Time: 2.800000 0.000000 2.800000 ( 2.814311) –  Leito Jul 17 '13 at 16:16
    
i rean the same on 32-bit ruby 2.0.0p247 DateTime: 0.200000 0.010000 0.210000 ( 0.200798) | Time: 0.180000 0.000000 0.180000 ( 0.184122) –  Kokizzu Sep 9 '13 at 13:40

I think the answer to "what's the difference" is one of the unfortunate common answers to this question in the Ruby standard libraries: the two classes/libs were created differently by different people at different times. It's one of the unfortunate consequences of the community nature of Ruby's evolution compared to carefully planned development of something like Java. Developers want new functionality but don't want to step on existing APIs so they just create a new class - to the end user there's no obvious reason for the two to exist.

This is true for software libraries in general: often the reason some code or API is the way it is turns out to be historical rather than logical.

The temptation is to start with DateTime because it seems more generic. Date... and Time, right? Wrong. Time also does dates better, and in fact can parse timezones where DateTime can't. Also it performs better.

I've ended up using Time everywhere.

To be safe though, I tend to allow for DateTime arguments to be passed into my Timey APIs, and either convert. Also if I know that both have the method I'm interested in I accept either, like this method I wrote for converting times to XML (for XMLTV files)

# Will take a date time as a string or as a Time or DateTime object and
# format it appropriately for xmtlv. 
# For example, the 22nd of August, 2006 at 20 past midnight in the British Summertime
# timezone (i.e. GMT plus one hour for DST) gives: "20060822002000 +0100"
def self.format_date_time(date_time)
  if (date_time.respond_to?(:rfc822)) then
    return format_time(date_time)
  else 
    time = Time.parse(date_time.to_s)
    return format_time(time)
  end    
end

# Note must use a Time, not a String, nor a DateTime, nor Date.
# see format_date_time for the more general version
def self.format_time(time)
  # The timezone feature of DateTime doesn't work with parsed times for some reason
  # and the timezone of Time is verbose like "GMT Daylight Saving Time", so the only
  # way I've discovered of getting the timezone in the form "+0100" is to use 
  # Time.rfc822 and look at the last five chars
  return "#{time.strftime( '%Y%m%d%H%M%S' )} #{time.rfc822[-5..-1]}"
end
share|improve this answer
7  
Also, Time.new and DateTime.new are dealing with time zone differently. I'm on GMT+7, so Time.new(2011, 11, 1, 10, 30) produces 2011-11-01 10:30:00 +0700 while DateTime.new(2011, 11, 1, 10, 30) produces Tue, 01 Nov 2011 10:30:00 +0000. –  Phương Nguyễn Oct 25 '11 at 4:47
5  
And as we all know, the carefully planned development of Java resulted in exclusively simple, logical APIs. –  pje Oct 16 '12 at 19:44
    
@PhươngNguyễn: Will you please add that as an answer so that I can up-vote it? That is precisely the reason I decided to choose Time over DateTime. –  Senseful Apr 7 '13 at 23:11

As of ruby 2.0, most of the aforementioned information is out of date.

In particular, Time is now practically unbound. It can be more or less than even 63 bits away from Epoch:

irb(main):001:0> RUBY_VERSION
=> "2.0.0"
irb(main):002:0> Time.at(2**62-1).utc # within Integer range
=> 146138514283-06-19 07:44:38 UTC
irb(main):003:0> Time.at(2**128).utc # outside of Integer range
=> 10783118943836478994022445751222-08-06 08:03:51 UTC
irb(main):004:0> Time.at(-2**128).utc # outside of Integer range
=> -10783118943836478994022445747283-05-28 15:55:44 UTC

The only consequence of using larger values should be performance, which is better when Integers are used (vs. Bignums (values outside of Integer range) or Rationals (when nanoseconds are tracked)):

Since Ruby 1.9.2, Time implementation uses a signed 63 bit integer, Bignum or Rational. The integer is a number of nanoseconds since the Epoch which can represent 1823-11-12 to 2116-02-20. When Bignum or Rational is used (before 1823, after 2116, under nanosecond), Time works slower as when integer is used. (http://www.ruby-doc.org/core-2.1.0/Time.html)

In other words, as far as I understand, DateTime no longer covers a wider range of potential values than Time.

In addition, two previously unmentioned restrictions of DateTime should probably be noted:

DateTime does not consider any leapseconds, does not track any summer time rules. (http://www.ruby-doc.org/stdlib-2.1.0/libdoc/date/rdoc/Date.html#class-Date-label-DateTime)

First, DateTime has no concept of leap seconds:

irb(main):001:0> RUBY_VERSION
=> "2.0.0"
irb(main):002:0> require "date"
=> true
irb(main):003:0> t = Time.new(2012,6,30,23,59,60,0)
=> 2012-06-30 23:59:60 +0000
irb(main):004:0> dt = t.to_datetime; dt.to_s
=> "2012-06-30T23:59:59+00:00"
irb(main):005:0> t == dt.to_time
=> false
irb(main):006:0> t.to_i
=> 1341100824
irb(main):007:0> dt.to_i
=> 1341100823

Second, DateTime has very limited understanding of time zones and in particular has no concept of daylight savings. It pretty much handles time zones as simple UTC + X offsets:

irb(main):001:0> RUBY_VERSION
=> "2.0.0"
irb(main):002:0> require "date"
=> true
irb(main):003:0> t = Time.local(2012,7,1)
=> 2012-07-01 00:00:00 +0200
irb(main):004:0> t.zone
=> "CEST"
irb(main):005:0> t.dst?
=> true
irb(main):006:0> dt = t.to_datetime; dt.to_s
=> "2012-07-01T00:00:00+02:00"
irb(main):007:0> dt.zone
=> "+02:00"
irb(main):008:0> dt.dst?
NoMethodError: undefined method `dst?' for #<DateTime:0x007f34ea6c3cb8>

This may cause trouble when times are entered as DST and then converted into a non-DST time zone without keeping track of the correct offsets outside of DateTime itself (many operating systems may actually already take care of this for you).

Overall, I'd say that nowadays Time is the better choice for most applications.

share|improve this answer

I found such things like parsing and calculating the beginning/end of a day in different timezones are easier to do with DateTime, assuming you are using the ActiveSupport extensions.

In my case I needed to calculate the end of the day in a user's timezone (arbitrary) based on the user's local time which I received as a string, e.g. "2012-10-10 10:10 +0300"

With DateTime it's as simple as

irb(main):034:0> DateTime.parse('2012-10-10 10:10 +0300').end_of_day
=> Wed, 10 Oct 2012 23:59:59 +0300
# it preserved the timezone +0300

Now let's try it the same way with Time:

irb(main):035:0> Time.parse('2012-10-10 10:10 +0300').end_of_day
=> 2012-10-10 23:59:59 +0000
# the timezone got changed to the server's default UTC (+0000), 
# which is not what we want to see here.

Actually, Time needs to know the timezone before parsing (also note it's Time.zone.parse, not Time.parse):

irb(main):044:0> Time.zone = 'EET'
=> "EET"
irb(main):045:0> Time.zone.parse('2012-10-10 10:10 +0300').end_of_day
=> Wed, 10 Oct 2012 23:59:59 EEST +03:00

So, in this case it's definitely easier to go with DateTime.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.