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I am beginner of CoffeeScript and Jasmine. At first, I tried to pass test with below code:

class Counter
    count: 0

    constructor: ->
        @count = 0

    increment: ->
        @count++

    decrement: ->
        @count--

    reset: ->
        @count = 0

root = exports ? this
root.Counter = Counter

The jasmine test code is below:

describe("Counter", ->
    counter = new Counter
    it("shold have 0 as a count variable at first", ->
        expect(counter.count).toBe(0)
    )

    describe('increment()', ->
        it("should count up from 0 to 1", ->
            expect(counter.increment()).toBe(1)
        )
    )
)

Then kind person told me that the code should be as below:

class Counter
    count: 0

    constructor: ->
        @count = 0

    increment: ->
        ++@count

    decrement: ->
        --@count

    reset: ->
        @count = 0

root = exports ? this
root.Counter = Counter

Yes, this code passed the test. But I have a question that the former code is more natural than latter code. I have no idea how to certain this question. Thank you for your help.

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1  
What do you mean "more natural"? If you've only seen a postincrement, then a preincrement may seem foreign, but it's just as valid. –  Ted Hopp Sep 27 '12 at 4:18
    
New related to your question, but that counter = new Counter should be wrapped in a beforeEach. –  loganfsmyth Sep 27 '12 at 6:16

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

you could change your code to the following to be more clear about return values if you choose to stick to post increment

class Counter
  count: 0

  constructor: ->
    @count = 0

  increment: ->
    @count++
    @count

  decrement: ->
    @count--
    @count
  reset: ->
    @count = 0

root = exports ? this
root.Counter = Counter

or you could change your test to:

describe('increment()', ->
  it("should count up from 0 to 1", ->
    expect(counter.count).toBe(0)
    counter.increment()
    expect(counter.count).toBe(1)
  )
)

but then you don't expect the returned value of increment and decrement to reflect the updated value of @count

here's an example to play with that will make the differences obvious: http://coffeescript.org/#try:class%20Counter%0A%20%20count%3A%200%0A%0A%20%20increment%3A%20-%3E%0A%20%20%20%20%40count%2B%2B%0A%20%20%20%20%40count%0A%20%20%0A%20%20inc%3A%20-%3E%0A%20%20%20%20%40count%2B%2B%0A%0A%20%20decrement%3A%20-%3E%0A%20%20%20%20--%40count%0A%0A%20%20dec%3A%20-%3E%0A%20%20%20%20%40count--%0A%0Acnt%20%3D%20new%20Counter%0Aalert%20cnt.increment()%0Aalert%20cnt.count%0Aalert%20cnt.inc()%0Aalert%20cnt.count%0Aalert%20cnt.decrement()%0Aalert%20cnt.count%0Aalert%20cnt.dec()%0Aalert%20cnt.count

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That's the basic difference between pre and post increment. @count++ will return the value of @count and increment it afterwards. ++@count will increment it first and return the new value. That's the reason your test fails if you use @count++. More about increment and decrement operators.

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