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I'm quite confused about the use of methods to manipulate a list in python. Say you have

mylist = [1,2,3,4]
mylist.append(5) #works fine, 

but when I put

def adding(mylist):
    mylist.append(5)

print adding(mylist) #will print out the orginal list without the 5.

Also,

data2 = data3 = [1,2,3]
data2 = data2 +[4]+[5]+[6] # doesn't works
data3 += [4] +[5] +[6] #works

But I'm quite confused how they work.

So I want to make a list(not in terms of python) of different ways to manipulate a list. Can anyone help?

share|improve this question
3  
You should check each of your examples in isolation. For example, print adding(mylist) should actually print None, because adding() doesn't return a value. You might be printing mylist somewehere else and getting confused. –  Marius Sep 27 '12 at 4:45
1  
Also, we would need to know what data2 and data3 are to understand why they do or don't work. –  Marius Sep 27 '12 at 4:47
    
I think your examples pasted here is not what you actually meant. I've guessed what you actually meant in my answer and tried to explain them. –  Kay Zhu Sep 27 '12 at 23:56

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I suspect the reason you expect the original code to work is because you are more familiar with passing by references in languages like C++. It is important then to be aware of the difference of pass by reference and pass by value. It is even more important to understand which one Python is using.

In short, Python actually uses neither pass by reference or pass by value; passing is done via object in Python.


Long answer:

An example of pass by value can be made with C:

#include <stdio.h>

void adding(int i) {
    i = i + 1;
}

int main() {
    int i = 0;
    adding(i);
    printf("i is %d\n", i);  // will print "i is 0"
    return 0;
}

Here, the value of i is copied when passed to adding(). the int i inside adding(int i) resides in a different memory location than the original int i inside main(). So inside adding(), i = i + 1 only affects the value in the chunk of memory known only inside the scope of adding(), the i in main() is totally unaffected because it resides in a different chunk of memory.

An example of pass by reference can be made with C++:

#include <iostream>

void adding(int &i) {
    i = i + 1;
}

int main() {
    int i = 0;
    adding(i);
    std::cout << "i is " << i << std::endl;  // will print "i is 1"
    return 0;
}

Here i is passed by reference to adding(). The i inside adding() refers to exactly the same chunk of memory as the i in main(). And hence, i will be incremented to 1.


Now, let's talk about Python by going back to your example (that I modified by guessing what you actually meant =]):

# Case 1
mylist = [1,2,3,4]
mylist.append(5)  # will print [1,2,3,4,5]

# Case 2
mylist = [1,2,3,4]
def adding(mylist):
    mylist.append(5)

adding(mylist)
print mylist  # will print [1,2,3,4,5]

# Case 3
mylist = [1,2,3,4]
def adding(mylist):
    mylist = mylist + [5]

adding(mylist)
print mylist  # will print [1,2,3,4]

# Case 4
mylist = [1,2,3,4]
def adding(mylist):
    mylist += [5]

adding(mylist)
print mylist  # will print [1,2,3,4,5]

Here, mylist is passed neither by value or reference. It is in fact passed by object.

In Python, mylist = [1,2,3,4] creates a list [1,2,3,4] and attach a tag mylist to it. The important thing here to note is that list is an object (IIRC, every object is a PyObject or an extension to it).

Understand this distinction will enable you to make sense of the outputs in the example cases:

  1. In Case 1, .append() is called on [1,2,3,4] list object directly to alter the list value, and hence the object myobject is attaching to has changed. Notice that this is possible also because lists are mutable objects in Python.

  2. In Case 2, mylist is NOT copied on passing to adding(), it is still "attached" to the same list object, similar to Case 1. Hence, calling .append() on this object will alter the object itself. Outside of adding(), since mylist still attaches to the same object (even though the object has altered itself), we get the output [1,2,3,4,5].

  3. In Case 3, inside adding(), the local variable mylist is attached to a new object created by [1,2,3,4]+[4]. But the object the original mylist is pointing to has never been altered, therefore, the output remains to be [1,2,3,4].

  4. Case 4 is a bit tricky. In Python lists are mutable, += acts as a shortcut like .extend(), which acts on the calling object itself. Hence, the original object has been modified to [1,2,3,4,5] and mylist still attaches to it. It is perhaps also worth noting that for immutable objects like tuples, strings and numbers, += will create a new object and attach the variable to it.


As for different ways to use lists in Python, this article written by Fredrik Lundh contains very thorough information.

share|improve this answer
def adding(mylist):
    mylist.append(5)

print adding(mylist) 

Your adding method doesn't return anything..

Add a return mylist after the mylist.append(5) in your adding method like this: -

def adding(mylist):
    mylist.append(5)
    return mylist
print adding(mylist)

Or you can just replace print adding() with this code(If you are not returning anything):-

adding(mylist)
print mylist

And, for your second problem: -

>>> data2 = data3 = [4, 5, 6]
>>> data2 = data2 + [1] + [2] + [3]
>>> print data2
[4, 5, 6, 1, 2, 3]
>>> data3 += [1] + [2] + [3]
>>> print data3
[4, 5, 6, 1, 2, 3]

Actually for me, both of them works.. And it should work, what is the output you are getting?? (Specially, What are you expecting your output to be??)

share|improve this answer

print adding(mylist) should print None since you are not returning anything from the function adding().

The following:

def adding(mylist):
    mylist.append(5)

test_list = range(5)

print adding(test_list)

print test_list

adding(test_list)

print test_list

produces this output:

None
[0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5]
[0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 5]

Can you be more specific about your second example? What is data2 originally? What do you expect?

share|improve this answer
def adding(mylist):
    mylist.append(5)

print adding(mylist) 

There is no return statement.

print mylist
[1,2,3,4,5]

This will print [1,2,3,4,5], since its pass by reference.. So your mylist will be modified even if you have not returned the list.

data2 = data3 = [1,2,3]
data2 = data2 +[4]+[5]+[6] #Actually works 
share|improve this answer
    
It is strictly speaking not passing by reference, but passing by objects. –  Kay Zhu Sep 27 '12 at 23:29

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