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I'm working on a class whose simplified version looks like this:

class Http_server {
public:
    void start(int port)
    {
        start_server();
        std::string content_type = extract_content_type(get_request());
    }

private:
    void start_server()
    {
        ...
    }

    std::string get_request()
    {
        ...
    }

    std::string extract_content_type(const std::string& request) const
    {
        ...
    }
};

Now I want to write a test case for extract_content_type. The problem is: it's private, so I cannot call it from the outside. The only function I can test is start, but that one would actually start the server (start_server) and wait for a request (get_request).

How I see it, I've got three options:

  1. Make extract_content_type public
  2. Extract extract_content_type into a utility class or namespace
  3. Make start_server and get_request virtual and create a mock object that overrides them

I don't want to make anything public or move to a utility namespace that's just used once in a single class, so the least evil is option 3.

I've seen at least one example of this in the V8 code base: http://code.google.com/p/v8/source/browse/trunk/test/cctest/test-date.cc

Still, I'm not sure if it's a good idea. virtual isn't the default in C++ for two reasons:

  1. It would induce performance/memory overhead (probably won't matter in my case though)
  2. Not every class is supposed to be used as a base class, making it explicit was also a design decision

What would you do? Live with the useless virtual? Or rather not test the function at all? I'm not into TDD, nor do I want to be, but it's just easier to develop functions like extract_content_type against a test.

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1  
I would say option 2 is the least evil one. With virtual, your method can be exposed publically in derived classes. –  juanchopanza Sep 27 '12 at 5:53
    
Likewise. with #2. If needed you can have your test case use a template<> or some such to wrap around your class and declare the template-specific as a friend under conditional compilation, but thats getting a little complicated. Opt for simple. –  WhozCraig Sep 27 '12 at 5:55

5 Answers 5

I think you may have another option:

Make the unit test class a friend of your class to test

class Foo {
  public:
#ifdef UNITTEST
    friend class FooTest;
#endif
    ...

  protected:
    ...

  private:
    ...
};

And here's the reference: http://praveen.kumar.in/2008/01/02/how-to-unit-test-c-private-and-protected-member-functions/

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I feel the ifdef unnecessary here. If one is to name its class FooTest just to mess up with the code, then one could perfectly define UNITTEST anyway! –  Matthieu M. Sep 27 '12 at 6:44
    
But that would essentially mean testing the private function. Isn't that pretty much a no-go in testing? –  futlib Sep 27 '12 at 10:20
    
@futlib I'm not sure if I understand your meaning. I think wrapping the no-go test code in a UnitTest class is a more OOP way that fits c++. –  chyx Sep 27 '12 at 12:52

The answer is that you don't test private functions. Ideally, you don't even write them, you create them by refactoring (although I admit that this is very hard in practice).

Your private functions should be tested implicitly when your public/protected functions are tested. If the functionality of a private function is not fully asserted that way, then that means the function does things that have no visible effect outside of the class.

This is not just a TDD issue. Since private functions are an implementation-detail I usually assume that I can refactor them without breaking anything. If there was a test for a function, and I decide to refactor it's signature, that wouldn't hold anymore, confusing me very much.

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I disagree. Specifically, the argument you make in the second paragraph could just as easily be used to argue against unit testing entirely: why test a particular unit of code at all? Test the whole system, and that should implicitly test every unit. If it does not test the whole of every unit, then clearly that unit does things that have no visible effect in the system. I'm not much a fan of private member functions (I prefer nonmember helpers, usually), but I see nothing wrong with testing them. –  James McNellis Sep 27 '12 at 6:24
    
Good point. I would counter that units should be tested because they might be used in contexts that cannot be foreseen at the time of programming (the same goes for non-member helpers). Private members however are exclusively used in the context of the class containing them, so there is no need for an explicit test. I do admit though that one should not be to rigid about such guidelines (as the esteemed Cpt. Barbossa puts it: And thirdly, the code is more what you'd call "guidelines" than actual rules.). –  Björn Pollex Sep 27 '12 at 6:31

If extract_content_type doesn't need any information contained in your Http_server class, it doesn't have to belong to that class. Really, it looks like you need a class for the request itself which can return its own content type. Then that request class could be tested.

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I really like this suggestion. However, I didn't tell you that I don't do anything with the request except extract its content type and print it out, so I'd like to keep things simple. –  futlib Sep 27 '12 at 7:12
    
Right. I think your second option is the best in this case. Possibly using some namespace to indicate its connection to the server class. –  Jason Sep 28 '12 at 2:45

I can suggest a different option, though I am not sure if you would like it.

You can create a

#define TESTING_VIRTUAL

that would expand to either virtual or nothing depending on a compile-time option. So if you are compiling a test, you can set it to be substituted with virtual and if it is for production, it would not be a virtual method.

The same is possible if the macro expands to private or public depending on whether you are compiling in test mode.

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I agree with Björn on this one. Whatever private functions a class does have or not have is up to the class and of no consern for callers. What would happend if you removed that private method, that is you decide it wasn't that hard to extract the content type so you do it directly in your start function? Well, You would break the test case, event though the class is working as it should. private is private! :)

My suggestion is that you put your extract_content_type in a utility class for content handeling and use that class in your test cast. No server code needs to be present to test this class then.

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