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Here is some code I'd like to execute. I'd like to wait for AJAX response so I can return something from the server. Any way to achieve this?

function functABC(){
    $.ajax({
        url: 'myPage.php',
        data: {id: id},
        success: function(data) {
            return data;
        }
    });

    //Wait for AJAX (???)
}

var response = functABC();
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2  
I don't understand. Why can't you use the success callback ? Maybe you're looking for api.jquery.com/jQuery.when –  mddw Sep 27 '12 at 6:17
    
I'd like to return the data to the response variable, where I called the function. However, the function returns null (because the AJAX call is asynchronous). Basically I want to know if it is possible to wait until the AJAX call is over to return the data. –  OneMore Sep 27 '12 at 6:20
    
So api.jquery.com/jQuery.when is what you're looking for. –  mddw Sep 27 '12 at 6:21
1  
@user1691818: Returning the data is a really bad idea. Instead learn to think with callbacks. Cut and paste whatever code you need to execute in the callback function passed to success. –  slebetman Sep 27 '12 at 6:35

4 Answers 4

up vote 8 down vote accepted

All Ajax calls can be done either asynchronously (with a callback function, this would be the function specified after the 'success' key) or synchronously - effectively blocking and waiting for the servers answer. To get a synchronous execution you have to specify

async: false 

like described here

Note, however, that in most cases asynchronous execution (via callback on success) is just fine.

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1  
async with value false is gone deprecated in most browser use cases. It may throw exceptions in newer version of browsers. See xhr.spec.whatwg.org/#sync-warning (applies to async parameter of xhr open method, which is what uses jQuery). –  Frederic Apr 21 at 10:58

The simple answer is to turn off async. But that's the wrong thing to do. The correct answer is to re-think how you write the rest of your code.

Instead of writing this:

function functABC(){
    $.ajax({
        url: 'myPage.php',
        data: {id: id},
        success: function(data) {
            return data;
        }
    });
}

function foo () {
    var response = functABC();
    some_result = bar(response);
    // and other stuff and
    return some_result;
}

You should write it like this:

function functABC(callback){
    $.ajax({
        url: 'myPage.php',
        data: {id: id},
        success: callback
    });
}

function foo (callback) {
    functABC(function(data){
        var response = data;
        some_result = bar(response);
        // and other stuff and
        callback(some_result);
    })
}

That is, instead of returning result, pass in code of what needs to be done as callbacks. As I've shown, callbacks can be nested to as many levels as you have function calls.


A quick explanation of why I say it's wrong to turn off async:

Turning off async will freeze the browser while waiting for the ajax call. The user cannot click on anything, cannot scroll and in the worst case, if the user is low on memory, sometimes when the user drags the window off the screen and drags it in again he will see empty spaces because the browser is frozen and cannot redraw. For single threaded browsers like IE7 it's even worse: all websites freeze! Users who experience this may think you site is buggy. If you really don't want to do it asynchronously then just do your processing in the back end and refresh the whole page. It would at least feel not buggy.

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use async:false attribute along with url and data. this will help to execute ajax call immediately and u can fetch and use data from server.

function functABC(){
    $.ajax({
        url: 'myPage.php',
        data: {id: id},
        async:false
        success: function(data) {
            return data;
        }
    });
}
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3  
"Note that synchronous requests may temporarily lock the browser, disabling any actions while the request is active." also "with jqXHR is deprecated; you must use the complete/success/error callbacks. –  Miszy Sep 27 '12 at 6:27

Method 1:

function functABC(){
    $.ajax({
        url: 'myPage.php',
        data: {id: id},
        success: function(data) {
            return data;
        },
        complete: function(){
              // do the job here
         }
    });
}

var response = functABC();

Method 2

function functABC(){
    $.ajax({
        url: 'myPage.php',
        data: {id: id},
        async: false,
        success: function(data) {
            return data;
        }        
    });

   // do the job here
}
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