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The button's width is 123. Why doesn't the following change it's width

Private Sub Button3_Click(ByVal sender As System.Object, ByVal e As System.EventArgs) Handles Button3.Click
    With Me.Button3
        IIf(.Width = 123, .Width = 233, .Width = 150)
    End With
End Sub

Does IIF just return a value? i.e if I want to set the button's width property then do I need to use an If structure?

Very little said about Iif in MSDN

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3 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Does IIF just return a value?

Yes.

i.e if I want to set the button's width property then do I need to use an If structure?

No, because you can assign the return value to the Width property:

With Me.Button3 
    .Width = IIf(.Width = 123, 233, 150) 
End With 

Note that, in current versions of VB.NET, the If Operator should be used instead of Iif, since it has a variety of advantages (type safety, short-circuiting, etc.). For example, using If(...) would allow your code to compile without an additional cast even if you had Option Strict On (which you should).

With Me.Button3 
    .Width = If(.Width = 123, 233, 150) 
End With 
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ok - I'm assuming that VB's Option Strict On is equivalent functionality to VBA's Option Explicit ? –  whytheq Sep 27 '12 at 7:29
    
@whytheq: No, VB's Option Explicit is equivalent to VBA's Option Explicit. Option Strict is something new: It disallows implicit conversions. –  Heinzi Sep 27 '12 at 7:41
    
glad I asked - thanks for the extra info + The Answer –  whytheq Sep 27 '12 at 16:13
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Use VB.NEt's If()-statement. It's called 'conditional operator' and exists in many languages. IIf is a VB-specific function and has a different behaviour. More information here: IIf() vs. If

In both cases, IIf and If just return a value (the IIF ones isn't typed; it's an object that has to be casted). It seems to do the thing you want anyway:

Private Sub Button3_Click(ByVal sender As System.Object, ByVal e As System.EventArgs) Handles Button3.Click
    Button3.Width = If(Button3.Width = 123, 233, 150)
End Sub
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Your code tests .Width = 123, then returns the boolean expression .Width = 233 if true or .Width = 150 if false, then throws the result away. This is not what you intended. You have three alternatives:

' IIf function - not recommended since it is not typesafe and evaluates all arguments.
.Width = IIf(.Width = 123, 233, 150)

' If operator - typesafe and only evaluates arguments as necessary.
.Width = If(.Width = 123, 233, 150)

' If statement - not an expression.
If .Width = 123 Then .Width = 233 Else .Width = 150
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ok - but there is no == in VB compared to C# so how did the comiler decide that .Width = 233 was a boolean expression rather than me trying to set a property? –  whytheq Sep 27 '12 at 7:07
    
It depends on context. <lvalue> = <expression> is interpreted as the assignment operator, but = inside an expression is interpreted as the equality operator. –  Christian Hayter Sep 27 '12 at 7:14
    
+1 thanks. So IIf is an expression whereas If is a not an expression but an operator ? –  whytheq Sep 27 '12 at 7:31
    
I've added to my answer which should clarify things. –  Christian Hayter Sep 27 '12 at 7:53
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