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I have made vectors that contain functions, but they had no argument list. Also, they were not inside of a class. I have a class named Dialog, and I need to store function-pointers with a specific signature. Here is my typedef for these functions:

typedef INT_PTR (*MsgHandler)(WPARAM,LPARAM);

But, since the vector that contains these MsgHandler's will be in my Dialog class, which will be inherited by my CMainWnd class, when I try to push_back the function, the signature of the function is different than that of MsgHandler. Here is my code, the 4 variations of trying to push_back the function in the vector, and the resulting errors for each of them:

typedef INT_PTR (*MsgHandler)(WPARAM,LPARAM);

class Dialog
{
protected:
    Dialog(void); // Must be inherited
    vector<MsgHandler> Handlers;
}

class CMainWnd : public Dialog
{
public:
    INT_PTR MyHandler(WPARAM wp, LPARAM lp) {
        return TRUE;
    }

    CMainWnd(void) {
        // Attempt 1: Handlers.push_back(MyHandler);
        // Attempt 2: Handlers.push_back(&MyHandler);
        // Attempt 3: Handlers.push_back(CMainWnd::MyHandler);
        // Attempt 4: Handlers.push_back(&CMainWnd::MyHandler);
    }
};

Attempt 1 yields the following error:

error C3867: 'CMainWnd::MyHandler': function call missing argument list; use '&CMainWnd::MyHandler' to create a pointer to member

Attempt 2 yields:

error C2276: '&' : illegal operation on bound member function expression

Attempt 3 yields:

error C3867: 'CMainWnd::MyHandler': function call missing argument list; use '&CMainWnd::MyHandler' to create a pointer to member

Attempt 4 yields:

error C2664: 'std::vector<_Ty>::push_back' : cannot convert parameter 1 from 'INT_PTR (__thiscall CMainWnd::* )(WPARAM,LPARAM)' to 'const MsgHandler &'

I think attempt 4 is the closest to being correct, but as stated previously since the function is a member, it alters the signature. How can I store function-pointers in the vector that is defined in the inherited class Dialog that:

  • Have a return type of INT_PTR
  • Have two parameters, the first being a WPARAM, and the second being a LPARAM
  • Are a member of the derived class whose constuctor is the one adding them to the vector

I have heard of using boost::function for doing things like this, but I have looked up documentation for it and I have no idea how to use it, it all seems confusing to me. I would very much like to just add the functions to the vector as if they were variables instead of bogging down my code with bind operations and what not (May just be because I am ignorant when it comes to boost functions).

Could someone help me figure out what I am doing wrong here, or show me how to use boost::function to do this? For the boost::function way, I have tried declaring the vector as vector<boost::function<INT_PTR(WPARAM,LPARAM)>> and tried adding MyHandler to it, but that did not work. I would prefer not to use boost if I don't have to, but if someone suggests the boost way of doing this please clarify how I could do this?

Thank you very much guys.

share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

This is where lambdas really shine if you have access to C++11. I'm going to change your code a little bit just because it's slightly easier to get it to work for me, but you should be able to fix it up for your needs quite easily:

#include <vector>
#include <functional>
#include <iostream>

class Dialog
{
protected:
    Dialog() { } // Must be inherited
    std::vector<std::function<bool (int, int)>> Handlers;
};

class CMainWnd : public Dialog
{
public:
    bool MyHandler(int wp, int lp) 
    {
        std::cout << "(" << wp << ", " << lp << ")\n";
        return true;
    }

    CMainWnd() 
    {
       Handlers.push_back([this](int wp, int lp) -> bool { return this->MyHandler(wp, lp); });
       std::cout << Handlers[0](1,1) << "\n";
    }
};

int main()
{
    CMainWnd c;
    return 0;
}

Edit: When using C++03 and boost instead:

#include <boost/function.hpp>
#include <boost/bind.hpp>

class Dialog
{
protected:
    Dialog() { } // Must be inherited
    std::vector<boost::function<bool (int, int)> > Handlers;
};

class CMainWnd : public Dialog
{
public:
    bool MyHandler(int wp, int lp) 
    {
        std::cout << "(" << wp << ", " << lp << ")\n";
        return true;
    }

    CMainWnd() 
    {
       Handlers.push_back(boost::bind(&CMainWnd::MyHandler, this, _1, _2));
       std::cout << Handlers[0](1,1) << "\n";
    }
};
share|improve this answer
3  
No need for a lambda here: Handlers.push_back( std::bind(CMainWnd::MyHandler,this) ); should do the trick. –  Michael Anderson Sep 27 '12 at 7:38
    
@MichaelAnderson: I would counter that and say no need for std::bind, we have lambdas. That's just my personal preference though. –  Benjamin Lindley Sep 27 '12 at 7:42
    
@MichaelAnderson Indeed, I'd actually forgotten you could bind this with std::bind. –  Yuushi Sep 27 '12 at 7:43
    
Your answer seems great, seems like exactly what I want. However, I do not have c++11 support. Would this same syntax work for boost::function? –  Brandon Miller Sep 27 '12 at 7:43
1  
@BrandonMiller See my edit for doing this with boost::function and boost::bind instead –  Yuushi Sep 27 '12 at 7:54

Think about this: When you create a vector of function pointers, what is the size of each element of the vector? That's right, the size of a function pointer. Now, how can you expect it to hold the pointer to a function as well as a pointer to the object, on which, the function is supposed to be called?

The C++ language features are designed around the "pay what you use" principle. So the function pointers are as light as they could be. Now, what you want is in fact delegates. Delegates are not a language feature in C++, so, whether or not you like it, you need to use something like boost::function (or write it yourself). There are faster delegate solutions than boost::function by the way, you can check: this code project and this one

Here's how to do it with boost::function:

#include <vector>
using namespace std;
#include <boost/function.hpp>
#include <boost/bind.hpp>

typedef int INT_PTR;
typedef int WPARAM;
typedef int LPARAM;

//typedef INT_PTR (*MsgHandler)(WPARAM,LPARAM);
typedef boost::function<INT_PTR(WPARAM,LPARAM)> MsgHandler;

class Dialog
{
protected:
    Dialog(void){} // Must be inherited
    vector<MsgHandler> Handlers;
};

class CMainWnd : public Dialog
{
public:
    INT_PTR MyHandler(WPARAM wp, LPARAM lp) {
        return true;
    }

    CMainWnd(void) {
        // Attempt 1: Handlers.push_back(MyHandler);
        // Attempt 2: Handlers.push_back(&MyHandler);
        // Attempt 3: Handlers.push_back(CMainWnd::MyHandler);
        // Attempt 4: Handlers.push_back(&CMainWnd::MyHandler);
    Handlers.push_back(boost::bind(&CMainWnd::MyHandler, this, _1,_2));
    }
};

int main() {
    CMainWnd w;

}

And here's with the impossibly fast delegates: (With the include path set correctly of course)

#include <vector>
using namespace std;
#define SRUTIL_DELEGATE_PREFERRED_SYNTAX
#include <srutil/delegate/delegate.hpp>

typedef int INT_PTR;
typedef int WPARAM;
typedef int LPARAM;

typedef srutil::delegate<INT_PTR(WPARAM,LPARAM)> MsgHandler;

class Dialog
{
protected:
    Dialog(void){} // Must be inherited
    vector<MsgHandler> Handlers;
};

class CMainWnd : public Dialog
{
public:
    INT_PTR MyHandler(WPARAM wp, LPARAM lp) {
        return true;
    }

    CMainWnd(void) {
    Handlers.push_back(MsgHandler::from_method<CMainWnd, 
              &CMainWnd::MyHandler>(this));
    }
};

int main() {
    CMainWnd w; 
}
share|improve this answer
    
I realized I may have to use boost::function, but as I said I have no clue as to HOW to use it. And attempting to add these to a vector further complicates it for me. I hope it doesn't seem like I am trying to get you to 'do my homework' for me, but looking at both of those pages only make me feel as if I have gotten myself into a situation that is well above my knowledge. –  Brandon Miller Sep 27 '12 at 7:25
    
And in the Impossible Fast Delegate page, it uses an instantiated object. I am trying to add these delegates to a vector in my class constructor, not outside of it using an instantiation of the class. –  Brandon Miller Sep 27 '12 at 7:28
1  
@BrandonMiller I've added the boost::function way of doing it –  enobayram Sep 27 '12 at 7:46
    
+1 for boost way and 3rd party way. I would've accepted this but before I saw it I saw Yuushis answer and it also shows how to execute the function. But good job :) –  Brandon Miller Sep 27 '12 at 8:12
    
@BrandonMiller It's OK, the lambda way is arguably more "standard" anyway :) –  enobayram Sep 27 '12 at 8:22

In C++ you'd usually use std::function or its boost equivalent. However theres a C style solution that may be appropriate in some situations - which is storing and passing additional user data to the function.

typedef INT_PTR (*MsgHandlerFn)(WPARAM,LPARAM, void*);
struct MsgHandler
{
   MsgHandler( 
     MsgHandlerFn in_fn,
     void * in_user_data )
   : fn(in_fn), user_data(in_user_data)
   {}
   //TODO: Add copy constructor, assignment operator, default constructor
   MshHandlerFn fn;
   void * user_data;
};

class Dialog
{
protected:
    Dialog(void); // Must be inherited
    vector<MsgHandler> Handlers;
};

class CMainWnd : public Dialog
{
  public:
    INT_PTR MyHandler(WPARAM wp, LPARAM lp) {
        return TRUE;
    }
  protected:
    static INT_PTR MyHandlerStatic(WPARAM wp, LPARAM lp, void * user_data)
    {
       return static_cast<CMainWnd*>(user_data)->MyHandler(wp,lp);
    }
  public:
    CMainWnd(void) {
      Handlers.push_back( MsgHandler( &CMainWnd::MyHandlerStatic, this ) );
     }
};

Now the loop where your dialog calls the handlers would need to look more like this

for( unsigned int i=0; i<Handlers.size(); ++i)
   Handlers[i].fn( wp,lp, Handlers[i].user_data);
share|improve this answer
    
Well, that way is kindof ugly and actually requires more code than I would have to do without using the function vector. But I'll give you +1 for the pure C way of doing it :) –  Brandon Miller Sep 27 '12 at 8:15

Here is a webpage describes your problem.

class member functions are Just Not normal functions. If declare a normal function is okay for you (seems ok in the example), just do it that way.

Are a member of the derived class whose constuctor is the one adding them to the vector

You can use a c function pointer to make the function member of your class, if you really have to. I don't know if you can declare a non-member-function member function in class declaration scope, if you can, do so.

good luck

share|improve this answer
    
I have used normal functions before to add in the vector, but now I MUST use the member function to add in the member vector. And thanks for the good luck because it seems I am going to need it. –  Brandon Miller Sep 27 '12 at 7:30

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